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  1. Steven Gross, Michael Williams & Nicholas Tebben (eds.) (forthcoming). Pragmatism, Minimalism and Metaphysics.
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  2. Michael Williams (forthcoming). Mādhva Vedānta at the Turn of the Early Modern Period: Vyāsatīrtha and the Navya-Naiyāyikas. International Journal of Hindu Studies.
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  3. Michael A. Williams (forthcoming). Book Review: Gnosis and Faith in Early Christianity: An Introduction to Gnosticism. [REVIEW] Interpretation 55 (1):96-98.
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  4. Michael Stuart Williams (2014). (S.) Palumbo (ed., trans.)Ambrogio di Milano:De Nabuthae historia. (Biblioteca della Tradizione Classica 3.) Pp. 365.Bari:Cacucci Editore,2012. Paper, €40. ISBN:978-88-6611-181-8. [REVIEW] The Classical Review 64 (2):630-631.
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  5. Michael Williams (2013). Skepticism, Evidence and Entitlement1. Philosophy and Phenomenological Research 87 (1):36-71.
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  6. Michael Williams (2013). The Unreality of Knowledge. Canadian Journal of Philosophy 23 (sup1):265-293.
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  7. Michael Williams (2012). Wright Against the Sceptics. In Crispin Wright & Annalisa Coliva (eds.), Mind, Meaning, and Knowledge: Themes From the Philosophy of Crispin Wright. Oxford University Press.
     
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  8. Michael Williams (2011). Pragmatism, Minimalism, Expressivism. International Journal of Philosophical Studies 18 (3):317-330.
    Although contemporary pragmatists tend to be sympathetic to expressivist accounts of moral, modal and other problematic vocabularies, it is not clear that they have any right to be. The problem arises because contemporary pragmatists tend to favour deflationary accounts of truth and reference, thereby seeming to elide the distinction between expressive and repressentational uses of language. To address this problem, I develop a meta-theoretical framework for understanding what is involved in explanations of meaning in terms of use, and why some (...)
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  9. Michael Williams (2011). Pyrrhonian Skepticism and Two Kinds of Knowledge. International Journal for the Study of Skepticism 1 (2):124-137.
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  10. Michael S. Williams (2011). Time and Authority in the Chronicle of Sulpicius Severus. In Alexandra Lianeri (ed.), The Western Time of Ancient History: Historiographical Encounters with the Greek and Roman Pasts. Cambridge University Press. 280.
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  11. Michael Stuart Williams (2011). Festschrift Matthews (S.) McGill, (C.) Sogno, (E.) Watts (Edd.) From the Tetrarchs to the Theodosians. Later Roman History and Culture, 284–450 C.E. (Yale Classical Studies 34.) Pp. X + 321, Ill. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 2010. Cased. £55, US$95. ISBN: 978-0-521-89821-8. [REVIEW] The Classical Review 61 (02):563-565.
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  12. Michael Williams (2010). Descartes' Transformation of the Sceptical Tradition. In Richard Arnot Home Bett (ed.), The Cambridge Companion to Ancient Scepticism. Cambridge University Press.
  13. Michael Williams (2010). Of the Sceptical Tradition. In Richard Arnot Home Bett (ed.), The Cambridge Companion to Ancient Scepticism. Cambridge University Press. 288.
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  14. Michael Williams (2009). A Traversal Beyond the Pleasure Principle: From Pervert to Schizophrenic. Theory and Event 12 (3).
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  15. Michael Williams (2009). The Tortoise and the Serpent : Sellars on the Structure of Empirical Knowledge. In Willem A. DeVries (ed.), Empiricism, Perceptual Knowledge, Normativity, and Realism: Essays on Wilfrid Sellars. Oxford University Press.
     
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  16. Richard Rorty, Michael Williams & David Bromwich (2008). Philosophy and the Mirror of Nature: Thirtieth-Anniversary Edition. Princeton University Press.
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  17. Michael Williams (2008). Responsibility and Reliability. Philosophical Papers 37 (1):1-26.
    ‘Responsibilist' approaches to epistemology link knowledge and justification with epistemically responsible belief management, where responsible management is understood to involve an essential element of guidance by recognized epistemic norms. By contrast, reliabilist approaches stress the de facto reliability of cognitive processes, rendering epistemic self-consciousness as inessential. I argue that, although an adequate understanding of human knowledge must make room for both responsibility and reliability, philosophers have had a hard time putting them together, largely owing to a tendency, on the part (...)
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  18. Michael Williams (2008). Hume's Skepticism. In John Greco (ed.), The Oxford Handbook of Skepticism. Oxford University Press.
  19. Michael Williams (2008). Towards a Better Understanding of Managerial Agency. Philosophy of Management 6 (2):9-26.
    It is time to transcend the arid debate between rationality and ir-, a-, or non-rationality as our basic assumption about human agency.1 There are powerful arguments and extensive evidence both for and against the rationality assumption, with heavily defended entrenchments on both sides. Managers andmanagement scholars continually make at least tacit assumptions about how they expect others to behave. If only we could have in both theory and practice the coherence and precision of rational models as well as the descriptive (...)
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  20. Michael Williams (2007). Is Managerial Intuition Rational? The Case of Long Term Capital Management. Philosophy of Management 6 (1):99-122.
    Modelling agency in economics rests primarily on the assumption of instrumental rationality. Managerial agency is more often analysed with a more complex ‘behavioural’ approach. This has led for years to a sterile debate about the usefulness of the abstract rationality postulate between those who think that it is all but sufficient and those who doubt if it is even necessary. This paper argues that positing an abstract (but real) rational core to managerial agency that is then ‘concretised’ towards actual managerial (...)
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  21. Michael Williams (2007). L7 Meaning, Truth and Normativityl. In Geo Siegwart & Dirk Griemann (eds.), Truth and Speech Acts: Studies in the Philosophy of Language. Routledge. 5--377.
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  22. Michael Williams (2007). Why (Wittgensteinian) Contextualism Is Not Relativism. Episteme 4 (1):93-114.
    This article distinguishes Wittgensteinian contextualism from epistemic relativism. The latter involves the view that a belief ’s status as justified depends on the believer’s epistemic system, as well as the view that no system is superior to another. It emerges from the thought that we must rely, circularly, on our epistemic system to determine whether any belief is justified. Contextualism, by contrast, emerges from the thought that we need not answer a skeptical challenge to a belief unless there is good (...)
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  23. Michael Williams (2006). Realism: What's Left? In Patrick Greenough & Michael P. Lynch (eds.), Truth and Realism. Oxford University Press. 77--99.
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  24. Michael Williams (2006). Science and Sensibility: McDowell and Sellars on Perceptual Experience. European Journal of Philosophy 14 (2):302–325.
  25. Michael C. Williams (2006). Glimmer of a New Leviathan: Total War in the Realism of Neibuhr, Mogenthau, and Waltz. Contemporary Political Theory 5 (3):346.
  26. Michael Stuart Williams (2006). Grig (L.) Making Martyrs in Late Antiquity . Pp Xiv + 207, Map, Ills, Pls. London: Duckworth, 2004. Cased, £45. ISBN: 0-7156-3285-X. [REVIEW] The Classical Review 56 (01):195-.
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  27. Michael Williams (2005). The Tragic Vision of Politics: Ethics, Interests and Orders. Contemporary Political Theory 4 (3):340.
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  28. Michael Stuart Williams (2005). Review: Constantine and Rome. [REVIEW] The Classical Review 55 (2):642-644.
     
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  29. Michael Stuart Williams (2005). Rome Under Constantine R. R. Holloway: Constantine and Rome Pp. Xvi + 191, Map, Ills. New Haven and London: Yale University Press, 2004. Cased, £25. ISBN: 0-300-10043-. [REVIEW] The Classical Review 55 (02):642-.
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  30. Michael Williams (2004). Context, Meaning, and Truth. Philosophical Studies 117 (1-2):107-130.
  31. Michael Williams (2004). Is Knowledge a Natural Phenomenon? In Richard Schantz (ed.), The Externalist Challenge. De Gruyter. 2--193.
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  32. Michael Williams (2004). Knowledge, Reflection and Sceptical Hypotheses. Erkenntnis 61 (2-3):315 - 343.
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  33. Michael Williams (2004). Scepticism and the Context of Philosophy. Philosophical Issues 14 (1):456–475.
  34. Michael Williams (2004). The Agrippan Argument and Two Forms of Skepticism. In Walter Sinnott-Armstrong (ed.), Pyrrhonian Skepticism. Oxford University Press. 121--145.
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  35. Michael Williams (2004). The Unity of Hume's Philosophical Project. Hume Studies 30 (2):265-296.
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  36. Michael Williams (2004). Wittgenstein's Refutation of Idealism. In Denis McManus (ed.), Wittgenstein and Scepticism. Routledge.
  37. Michael Williams (2004). Wittgenstein, Truth and Certainty. In Max Kölbel & Bernhard Weiss (eds.), Wittgenstein's Lasting Significance. Routledge.
     
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  38. Michael Williams, Frederick F. Schmitt, Erin I. Kelly & Louis E. Loeb (2004). A Symposium on Louis E. Loeb, Stability and Justification in Hume's Treatise. Hume Studies 30 (2):265-404.
     
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  39. Michael Williams (2003). Are There Two Grades of Knowledge? Aristotelian Society Supplementary Volume 77 (1):91–112.
    [Michael Williams] A response to Sosa's criticisms of Sellars's account of the relation between knowledge and experience, noting that Sellars excludes merely animal knowledge, and hopes to bypass epistemology by an adequate philosophy of mind and language. /// [Ernest Sosa] I give an exposition and critical discussion of Sellars's Myth of the Given, and especially of its epistemic side. In later writings Sellars takes a pragmatist turn in his epistemology. This is explored and compared with his earlier critique of givenist (...)
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  40. Michael Williams (2003). Review: Marx and Hegel: New Scholarship, Continuing Questions. [REVIEW] Science and Society 67 (4):489 - 496.
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  41. Michael Williams (2003). 3 Rorty on Knowledge and Truth. In Charles B. Guignon & David R. Hiley (eds.), Richard Rorty. Cambridge University Press. 61.
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  42. Michael Williams (2002). The Foundations of Morality. Philosophy Now 38:44-44.
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  43. Michael Williams (2001). Contextualism, Externalism and Epistemic Standards. Philosophical Studies 103 (1):1 - 23.
    I want to discuss an approach to knowledge that I shall call simple conversational contextualism or SCC for short. Proponents of SCC think that it offers an illuminating account of both why scepti- cism is wrong and why arguments for scepticism are so intuitively appealing. I have my doubts.
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  44. Michael Williams (2001). Problems of Knowledge: A Critical Introduction to Epistemology. OUP Oxford.
    What is epistemology or 'the theory of knowledge'? What is it really about? Why does it matter? What makes theorising about knowledge 'philosophical'? Why do some philosophers argue that epistemology - perhaps even philosophy itself - is dead? In this exciting and original introduction, Michael Williams shows how epistemological theorizing is sensitive to a range of questions about the nature, limits, methods, and value of knowing. He pays special attention to the challenge of philosophical scepticism: does our 'knowledge' rest on (...)
     
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  45. Michael Williams (2000). Dretske on Epistemic Entitlement. Philosophy and Phenomenological Research 60 (3):607-612.
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  46. Michael Williams (2000). ¿ Es Enunciable El Contextualismo?: Una Respuesta a Robert Fogelin. Teorema: Revista Internacional de Filosofía 19 (3):81-86.
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  47. Michael Williams (2000). No Escape From the "Post-Hegelian" Dialectic. Science and Society 64 (3):357 - 365.
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  48. Michael J. Williams (2000). Is Contextualism Statable? Noûs 34 (s1):80-85.
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  49. Michael Williams (1999). Fogelin's Neo-Pyrrhonism. International Journal of Philosophical Studies 7 (2):141 – 158.
    Robert Fogelin agrees that arguments for Cartesian sceptism carry a heavy burden of theoretical commitment, for they take for granted, explicitly or implicitly, the foundationalist's idea that experimental knowledge is in some fully general way 'epistemologically prior' to knowledge of the world. He thinks, however, that there is a much more direct and commonsensical route to scepticism. Ordinary knowledge-claims are accepted on the basis of justificatory procedures that fall far short of eliminating all conceivable error-possibilities. As a result, it is (...)
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  50. Michael Williams (1999). How Are We to Live? Philosophy Now 24:42-43.
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