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  1. Michael Wooldridge & Bruce Edmonds, Reasoning About Rational Agents.
    what is now the mainstream view as to the best way forward in the dream of engineering reliable software systems out of autonomous agents. The way of using formal logics to specify, implement and verify distributed systems of interacting units using a guiding analogy of beliefs, desires and intentions. The implicit message behind the book is this: Distributed Artificial Intelligence (DAI) can be a respectable engineering science. It says: we use sound formal systems; can cite established philosophical foundations; and will (...)
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  2. John Grant, Sarit Kraus, Michael Wooldridge & Inon Zuckerman (2014). Manipulating Games by Sharing Information. Studia Logica 102 (2):267-295.
    We address the issue of manipulating games through communication. In the specific setting we consider (a variation of Boolean games), we assume there is some set of environment variables, the values of which are not directly accessible to players; the players have their own beliefs about these variables, and make decisions about what actions to perform based on these beliefs. The communication we consider takes the form of (truthful) announcements about the values of some environment variables; the effect of an (...)
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  3. Nicolas Troquard, Wiebe Hoek & Michael Wooldridge (2011). Reasoning About Social Choice Functions. Journal of Philosophical Logic 40 (4):473-498.
    We introduce a logic specifically designed to support reasoning about social choice functions. The logic includes operators to capture strategic ability, and operators to capture agent preferences. We establish a correspondence between formulae in the logic and properties of social choice functions, and show that the logic is expressively complete with respect to social choice functions, i.e., that every social choice function can be characterised as a formula of the logic. We prove that the logic is decidable, and give a (...)
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  4. Nicolas Troquard, Wiebe van der Hoek & Michael Wooldridge (2011). Reasoning About Social Choice Functions. Journal of Philosophical Logic 40 (4):473-498.
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  5. Michael Wooldridge (2010). Postulates for Revising BDI Structures. Synthese 175 (1):39 - 62.
    The process of rationally revising beliefs in the light of new information is a topic of great importance and long-standing interest in artificial intelligence. Moreover, significant progress has been made in understanding the philosophical, logical, and computational foundations of belief revision. However, very little research has been reported with respect to the revision of other mental states, most notably propositional attitudes such as desires and intentions. In this paper, we present a first attempt to formulate a general framework for understanding (...)
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  6. Thomas Ågotnes, Wiebe Van Der Hoek, Juan A. Rodríguez-Aguilar, Carles Sierra & Michael Wooldridge (2009). Multi-Modal CTL: Completeness, Complexity, and an Application. Studia Logica 92 (1):1 - 26.
    We define a multi-modal version of Computation Tree Logic (CTL) by extending the language with path quantifiers $E^\delta $ and $E^\delta $ where δ denotes one of finitely many dimensions, interpreted over Kripke structures with one total relation for each dimension. As expected, the logic is axiomatised by taking a copy of a CTL axiomatisation for each dimension. Completeness is proved by employing the completeness result for CTL to obtain a model along each dimension in turn. We also show that (...)
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  7. Thomas Ågotnes, Wiebe Van der Hoek, Juan A. Rodríguez-Aguilar, Carles Sierra & Michael Wooldridge (2009). Multi-Modal CTL: Completeness, Complexity, and an Application. [REVIEW] Studia Logica 92 (1):1-26.
    We define a multi-modal version of Computation Tree Logic (ctl) by extending the language with path quantifiers E δ and A δ where δ denotes one of finitely many dimensions, interpreted over Kripke structures with one total relation for each dimension. As expected, the logic is axiomatised by taking a copy of a ctl axiomatisation for each dimension. Completeness is proved by employing the completeness result for ctl to obtain a model along each dimension in turn. We also show that (...)
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  8. Edith Elkind, Leslie Ann Goldberg, Paul W. Goldberg & Michael Wooldridge (2009). A Tractable and Expressive Class of Marginal Contribution Nets and Its Applications. Mathematical Logic Quarterly 55 (4):362-376.
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  9. Thomas Ågotnes, Wiebe van der Hoek & Michael Wooldridge (2008). Quantified Coalition Logic. Synthese 165 (2):269 - 294.
    We add a limited but useful form of quantification to Coalition Logic, a popular formalism for reasoning about cooperation in game-like multi-agent systems. The basic constructs of Quantified Coalition Logic (QCL) allow us to express such properties as "every coalition satisfying property P can achieve φ" and "there exists a coalition C satisfying property P such that C can achieve φ". We give an axiomatisation of QCL, and show that while it is no more expressive than Coalition Logic, it is (...)
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  10. Thomas Ågotnes, Wiebe van der Hoek & Michael Wooldridge (2008). Quantified Coalition Logic. Synthese 165 (2):269 - 294.
    We add a limited but useful form of quantification to Coalition Logic, a popular formalism for reasoning about cooperation in game-like multi-agent systems. The basic constructs of Quantified Coalition Logic (QCL) allow us to express such properties as “every coalition satisfying property P can achieve φ” and “there exists a coalition C satisfying property P such that C can achieve φ”. We give an axiomatisation of QCL, and show that while it is no more expressive than Coalition Logic, it is (...)
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  11. Giacomo Bonanno, Wiebe van der Hoek & Michael Wooldridge (eds.) (2008). Logic and the Foundations of Game and Decision Theory. Amsterdam University Press.
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  12. Paul E. Dunne, Wiebe van der Hoek & Michael Wooldridge (2007). A Logical Characterisation of Qualitative Coalitional Games. Journal of Applied Non-Classical Logics 17 (4):477-509.
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  13. Wiebe van Der Hoek, Wojciech Jamroga & Michael Wooldridge (2007). Towards a Theory of Intention Revision. Synthese 155 (2):265 - 290.
    Although the change of beliefs in the face of new information has been widely studied with some success, the revision of other mental states has received little attention from the theoretical perspective. In particular, intentions are widely recognised as being a key attitude for rational agents, and while several formal theories of intention have been proposed in the literature, the logic of intention revision has been hardly considered. There are several reasons for this: perhaps most importantly, intentions are very closely (...)
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  14. Wiebe van Der Hoek, Mark Roberts & Michael Wooldridge (2007). Social Laws in Alternating Time: Effectiveness, Feasibility, and Synthesis. Synthese 156 (1):1 - 19.
    Since it was first proposed by Moses, Shoham, and Tennenholtz, the social laws paradigm has proved to be one of the most compelling approaches to the offline coordination of multiagent systems. In this paper, we make four key contributions to the theory and practice of social laws in multiagent systems. First, we show that the "Alternating-time Temporal Logic" (atl) of Alur, Henzinger, and Kupferman provides an elegant and powerful framework within which to express and understand social laws for multiagent (...)
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  15. Wiebe van der Hoek, Wojciech Jamroga & Michael Wooldridge (2007). Towards a Theory of Intention Revision. Synthese 155 (2):265-290.
    Although the change of beliefs in the face of new information has been widely studied with some success, the revision of other mental states has received little attention from the theoretical perspective. In particular, intentions are widely recognised as being a key attitude for rational agents, and while several formal theories of intention have been proposed in the literature, the logic of intention revision has been hardly considered. There are several reasons for this: perhaps most importantly, intentions are very closely (...)
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  16. Wiebe van der Hoek, Mark Roberts & Michael Wooldridge (2007). Social Laws in Alternating Time: Effectiveness, Feasibility, and Synthesis. Synthese 156 (1):1-19.
    Since it was first proposed by Moses, Shoham, and Tennenholtz, the social laws paradigm has proved to be one of the most compelling approaches to the offline coordination of multiagent systems. In this paper, we make four key contributions to the theory and practice of social laws in multiagent systems. First, we show that the Alternating-time Temporal Logic (atl) of Alur, Henzinger, and Kupferman provides an elegant and powerful framework within which to express and understand social laws for multiagent systems. (...)
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  17. Sieuwert van Otterloo, Wiebe Van Der Hoek & Michael Wooldridge (2006). Knowledge Condition Games. Journal of Logic, Language and Information 15 (4):425-452.
    Understanding the flow of knowledge in multi-agent protocols is essential when proving the correctness or security of such protocols. Current logical approaches, often based on model checking, are well suited for modeling knowledge in systems where agents do not act strategically. Things become more complicated in strategic settings. In this paper we show that such situations can be understood as a special type of game – a knowledge condition game – in which a coalition “wins” if it is able to (...)
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  18. Sieuwert van Otterloo & Michael Wooldridge (2006). Matthew Weiner and Nuel Belnap/How Causal Probabilities Might Fit Into Our Objectively Indeterministic World Mp Lynch/Zombies and the Case of the Phenomenal Pickpocket. Synthese 149 (1):577-578.
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  19. Sieuwert Van Otterloo, Michael Wooldridge & Peter Mcburney (2006). Foreword. Synthese 149 (2):255-256.
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  20. Wiebe van Der Hoek & Michael Wooldridge (2003). Cooperation, Knowledge, and Time: Alternating-Time Temporal Epistemic Logic and Its Applications. Studia Logica 75 (1):125 - 157.
    Branching-time temporal logics have proved to be an extraordinarily successful tool in the formal specification and verification of distributed systems. Much of their success stems from the tractability of the model checking problem for the branching time logic CTL, which has made it possible to implement tools that allow designers to automatically verify that systems satisfy requirements expressed in CTL. Recently, CTL was generalised by Alur, Henzinger, and Kupferman in a logic known as "Alternating-time Temporal Logic" (ATL). The key (...)
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  21. Wiebe van der Hoek & Michael Wooldridge (2003). Cooperation, Knowledge, and Time: Alternating-Time Temporal Epistemic Logic and its Applications. Studia Logica 75 (1):125-157.
    Branching-time temporal logics have proved to be an extraordinarily successful tool in the formal specification and verification of distributed systems. Much of their success stems from the tractability of the model checking problem for the branching time logic CTL, which has made it possible to implement tools that allow designers to automatically verify that systems satisfy requirements expressed in CTL. Recently, CTL was generalised by Alur, Henzinger, and Kupferman in a logic known as Alternating-time Temporal Logic (ATL). The key insight (...)
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  22. Wiebe van der Hoek & Michael Wooldridge (2003). Preface. Studia Logica 75 (1):3-5.
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  23. Michael Wooldridge (2003). Wiebe van der Hoek Michael Wooldridge. Studia Logica 75:125-157.
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  24. Michael Wooldridge, Clare Dixon & Michael Fisher (1998). A Tableau-Based Proof Method for Temporal Logics of Knowledge and Belief. Journal of Applied Non-Classical Logics 8 (3):225-258.
    ABSTRACT In this paper we define two logics, KLn and BLn, and present tableau-based decision procedures for both. KLn is a temporal logic of knowledge. Thus, in addition to the usual connectives of linear discrete temporal logic, it contains a set of unary modal connectives for representing the knowledge possessed by agents. The logic BLn is somewhat similar; it is a temporal logic that contains connectives for representing the beliefs of agents. In addition to a complete formal definition of the (...)
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  25. Michael Wooldridge (1996). Temporal Belief Logics for Modelling Distributed Artificial Intelligence Systems. In N. Jennings & G. O'Hare (eds.), Foundations of Distributed Artificial Intelligence. Wiley. 269--286.
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