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Profile: Michael E. Zimmerman (University of Colorado, Boulder)
  1. Michael J. Zimmerman (2014). Against Moral Responsibility, by Bruce N. Waller. Mind 123 (490):657-661.
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  2. Michael J. Zimmerman (2013). The Immorality of Punishment: A Reply to Levy. Criminal Law and Philosophy:1-10.
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  3. David Loye & Michael Zimmerman (2011). Science and Religion: A New Alliance to Combat the New Wave of Creationism. World Futures 67 (1):1-10.
  4. Michael E. Zimmerman (2011). Last Man or Overman? Transhuman Appropriations of a Nietzschean Theme. Hedgehog Review 13 (2):31-44.
    To what extent can Nietzsche's idea of the Overman be used in connection with transhumanist notions of highly advanced humans and even posthumans?
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  5. Michael J. Zimmerman (2011). Ross on Retributivism. In Thomas Hurka (ed.), Underivative Duty: British Moral Philosophers From Sidgwick to Ewing. Oup Oxford.
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  6. Michael J. Zimmerman (2011). The Immorality of Punishment. Broadview Press.
    It is hard to imagine a state functioning at all, let alone well, without having recourse to punishing those who break its laws. In The Immorality of Punishment, Michael Zimmerman argues not merely that our current practice of punishment is deplorable but that legal punishment itself is wrong, no matter its form. This astounding thesis is defended firstly by a sustained and compelling attack on the alternatives. Punishment is not justified by its role as a deterrent, because qua deterrent, we (...)
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  7. Michael Zimmerman (2010). Responsibility : Act and Omission. In John Skorupski (ed.), The Routledge Companion to Ethics. Routledge.
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  8. Michael J. Zimmerman (2010). Moral Luck. Canadian Journal of Philosophy 36 (4):585-608.
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  9. Michael J. Zimmerman (2010). Review of Fred Feldman, What is This Thing Called Happiness?. [REVIEW] Notre Dame Philosophical Reviews 2010 (7).
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  10. Michael J. Zimmerman (2010). Responsibility, Reaction, and Value. Journal of Ethics 14 (2):103-115.
    Many writers accept the following thesis about responsibility: (R) For one to be responsible for something is for one to be such that it is fitting that one be the object of some reactive attitude with respect to that thing. This thesis bears a striking resemblance to a thesis about value that is also accepted by many writers: (V) For something to be good (or neutral, or bad) is for it to be such that it is fitting that it be (...)
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  11. Michael E. Zimmerman (2009). Religious Motifs in Technological Posthumanism. Western Humanities Review (3):67-83.
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  12. Michael J. Zimmerman (2009). Responsibility and Awareness. Philosophical Books 50 (4):248-261.
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  13. Michael J. Zimmerman (2009). Understanding What's Good for Us. Ethical Theory and Moral Practice 12 (4):429 - 439.
    The ancient question of what a good life consists in is currently the focus of intense debate. There are two aspects to this debate: the first concerns how the concept of a good life is to be understood; the second concerns what kinds of life fall within the extension of this concept. In this paper, I will attend only to the first, conceptual aspect and not to the second, substantive aspect. More precisely, I will address the preliminary, underlying question of (...)
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  14. Michael Zimmerman (2008). A Magisterial Mutualism. Bioscience 58 (2):91.
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  15. Michael E. Zimmerman (2008). The Singularity: A Crucial Phase in Divine Self-Actualization? Cosmos and History: The Journal of Natural and Social Philosophy 4 (1-2):347-370.
    Ray Kurzweil and others have posited that the confluence of nanotechnology, artificial intelligence, robotics, and genetic engineering will soon produce posthuman beings that will far surpass us in power and intelligence. Just as black holes constitute a ldquo;singularityrdquo; from which no information can escape, posthumans will constitute a ldquo;singularity:rdquo; whose aims and capacities lie beyond our ken. I argue that technological posthumanists, whether wittingly or unwittingly, draw upon the long-standing Christian discourse of ldquo;theosis,rdquo; according to which humans are capable of (...)
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  16. Michael J. Zimmerman, Intrinsic Vs. Extrinsic Value. Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy.
    Intrinsic value has traditionally been thought to lie at the heart of ethics. Philosophers use a number of terms to refer to such value. The intrinsic value of something is said to be the value that that thing has “in itself,” or “for its own sake,” or “as such,” or “in its own right.” Extrinsic value is value that is not intrinsic.
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  17. Michael J. Zimmerman (2008). Living with Uncertainty: The Moral Significance of Ignorance. Cambridge University Press.
    Every choice we make is set against a background of massive ignorance about our past, our future, our circumstances, and ourselves. Philosophers are divided on the moral significance of such ignorance. Some say that it has a direct impact on how we ought to behave - the question of what our moral obligations are; others deny this, claiming that it only affects how we ought to be judged in light of the behaviour in which we choose to engage - the (...)
     
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  18. Michael J. Zimmerman (2007). Feldman on the Nature and Value of Pleasure. [REVIEW] Philosophical Studies 136 (3):425 - 437.
  19. Michael J. Zimmerman (2007). Review: Feldman on the Nature and Value of Pleasure. [REVIEW] Philosophical Studies 136 (3):425 - 437.
  20. Michael J. Zimmerman (2007). The Good and the Right. Utilitas 19 (3):326-353.
    T. M. Scanlon has revived a venerable tradition according to which something's being good consists in its being such that there is a reason to respond positively towards it. He has presented novel arguments for this thesis. In this article, I first develop some refinements of the thesis with a view to focusing on intrinsic value in particular, then discuss the relation between the thesis and consequentialism, then critically examine Scanlon's arguments for the thesis, and finally turn to the question (...)
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  21. Michael J. Zimmerman (2006). Is Moral Obligation Objective or Subjective? Utilitas 18 (4):329-361.
    Many philosophers hold that whether an act is overall morally obligatory is an ‘objective’ matter, many that it is a ‘subjective’ matter, and some that it is both. The idea that it is or can be both may seem to promise a helpful answer to the question ‘What ought I to do when I do not know what I ought to do?’ In this article, three broad views are distinguished regarding what it is that obligation essentially concerns: the maximization of (...)
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  22. Michael J. Zimmerman (2006). Moral Luck: A Partial Map. Canadian Journal of Philosophy 36 (4):585-608.
  23. Michael J. Zimmerman (2006). On the Fulfillment of Moral Obligation. Ethical Theory and Moral Practice 9 (5):577 - 597.
    This paper considers three general views about the nature of moral obligation and three particular answers (with which these views are typically associated) concerning the following question: if on Monday you lend me a book that I promise to return to you by Friday, what precisely is my obligation to you and what constitutes its fulfillment? The example is borrowed from W.D. Ross, who in The Right and the Good proposed what he called the Objective View of obligation, from (...)
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  24. Michael J. Zimmerman (2006). Shifts in Moral Obligation. The Harvard Review of Philosophy 14 (1):62-79.
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  25. Kris McDaniel, Jason R. Raibley, Richard Feldman & Michael J. Zimmerman (eds.) (2005). The Good, the Right, Life And Death: Essays in Honor of Fred Feldman. Ashgate.
  26. Toni Rønnow-Rasmussen & Michael J. Zimmerman (eds.) (2005). Recent Work on Intrinsic Value. Springer.
    Recent Work on Intrinsic Value brings together for the first time many of the most important and influential writings on the topic of intrinsic value to have appeared in the last half-century. During this period, inquiry into the nature of intrinsic value has intensified to such an extent that at the moment it is one of the hottest topics in the field of theoretical ethics. The contributions to this volume have been selected in such a way that all of the (...)
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  27. Michael E. Zimmerman (2005). Integral Ecology: A Perspectival, Developmental, and Coordinating Approach to Environmental Problems. World Futures 61 (1 & 2):50 – 62.
    Integral Ecology uses multiple perspectives to analyze environmental problems. Four of Integral Ecology's major analytical perspectives (known as the quadrants) correspond to the four divisions of the liberal arts and sciences: fine arts, natural science, social science, and humanities. Integral Ecology also utilizes the analytical perspective provided by the idea of cultural moral development. This perspective helps to reveal how stakeholders at different developmental stages disclose a phenomenon, in this case, a tropical forest that loggers propose to clear-cut. Integral Ecology (...)
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  28. Michael J. Zimmerman (2005). Deontic Morality and Control. Ishtiyaque Haji. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 2002. Pp. XIV, 288. Philosophy and Phenomenological Research 70 (2):492–495.
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  29. Michael J. Zimmerman (2005). Deontic Morality and Control. Philosophy and Phenomenological Research 70 (2):492-495.
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  30. Michael J. Zimmerman (2005). The Relevance of Risk to Wrongdoing. In Kris McDaniel, Jason R. Raibley, Richard Feldman & Michael J. Zimmerman (eds.), The Good, the Right, Life And Death: Essays in Honor of Fred Feldman. Ashgate.
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  31. Michael J. Zimmerman (2004). Another Plea for Excuses. American Philosophical Quarterly 41 (3):259 - 266.
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  32. Michael J. Zimmerman (2004). Judith Jarvis Thomson, Goodness and Advice (Princeton, NJ: Princeton University Press, 2000), XVI + 188 Pp. [REVIEW] Noûs 38 (3):534–552.
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  33. Michael E. Zimmerman (2003). Architectural Ethics, Multiculturalism, and Globalization. Professional Ethics, a Multidisciplinary Journal 11 (3):17-30.
  34. Michael J. Zimmerman (2003). Time and Punishment. In Heather Dyke (ed.), Time and Ethics: Essays at the Intersection. Kluwer Academic Publishers. 55--70.
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  35. Margot Badran, John Charles Chasteen, Peter Redfield, Coco Owen, Izumi Sakamoto, Silvia Tomá?ková & Michael E. Zimmerman (2002). The Concept of the Foreign: An Interdisciplinary Dialogue. Lexington Books.
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  36. Michael J. Zimmerman (2002). Controlling Ignorance: A Bitter Truth. Journal of Social Philosophy 33 (3):483–490.
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  37. Michael J. Zimmerman (2002). Taking Luck Seriously. Journal of Philosophy 99 (11):553-576.
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  38. Michael E. Zimmerman (2001). Hegel: A Biography (Review). [REVIEW] Journal of the History of Philosophy 39 (1):155-156.
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  39. Michael J. Zimmerman (2001). The Nature of Intrinsic Value. Rowman and Littlefield.
    At the heart of ethics reside the concepts of good and bad; they are at work when we assess whether a person is virtuous or vicious, an act right or wrong, a decision defensible or indefensible, a goal desirable or undesirable. But there are many varieties of goodness and badness. At their core lie intrinsic goodness and badness, the sort of value that something has for its own sake. It is in virtue of intrinsic value that other types of value (...)
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  40. Peder Anker, Per Ariansen, Alfred J. Ayer, Murray Bookchin, Baird Callicott, John Clark, Bill Devall, Fons Elders, Paul Feyerabend, Warwick Fox, William C. French, Harold Glasser, Ramachandra Guha, Patsy Hallen, Stephan Harding, Andrew Mclaughlin, Ivar Mysterud, Arne Naess, Bryan Norton, Val Plumwood, Peter Reed, Kirkpatrick Sale, Ariel Salleh, Karen Warren, Richard A. Watson, Jon Wetlesen & Michael E. Zimmerman (1999). Philosophical Dialogues: Arne Naess and the Progress of Philosophy. Rowman & Littlefield Publishers.
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  41. Michael J. Zimmerman (1999). The Moral Aspect of Nonmoral Goods and Evils. Utilitas 11 (01):1-15.
    The idea that immoral behaviour can sometimes be admirable, and that moral behaviour can sometimes be less than admirable, has led several of its supporters to infer that moral considerations are not always overriding, contrary to what has been traditionally maintained. In this paper I shall challenge this inference. My purpose in doing so is to expose and acknowledge something that has been inadequately appreciated, namely, the moral aspect of nonmoral goods and evils. I hope thereby to show that, even (...)
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  42. Michael J. Zimmerman (1999). Daniel Guevara. Philosophy 74 (287).
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  43. Michael J. Zimmerman (1999). In Defense Ofthe Concept of Intrinsic Value. Canadian Journal of Philosophy 29 (3):389-409.
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  44. Michael J. Zimmerman (1999). Virtual Intrinsic Value and the Principle of Organic Unities. Philosophy and Phenomenological Research 59 (3):653-666.
    This paper argues that Moore's principle of organic unities is false. Advocates of the principle have failed to take note of the distinction between actual intrinsic value and virtual intrinsic value. Purported cases of organic unities, where the actual intrinsic value of a part of a whole is allegedly defeated by the actual intrinsic value of the whole itself, are more plausibly seen as cases where the part in question has no actual intrinsic value but instead a plurality of merely (...)
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  45. Michael E. Zimmerman (1998). John D. Caputo: A Postmodern, Prophetic, Liberal American in Paris. [REVIEW] Continental Philosophy Review 31 (2):195-214.
  46. Michael E. Zimmerman (1997). Michael Stoeber and Hugo Meynell, Eds., Critical Reflections on the Paranormal Reviewed By. Philosophy in Review 17 (3):215-217.
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  47. Michael E. Zimmerman (1997). The. Philosophy Today 41 (2):235-254.
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  48. Michael J. Zimmerman (1997). A Plea for Accuses. American Philosophical Quarterly 34 (2):229 - 243.
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  49. Michael J. Zimmerman (1997). Moral Responsibility and Ignorance. Ethics 107 (3):410-426.
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