Search results for 'Michele Card Pellegrino' (try it on Scholar)

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  1.  9
    Michele Card Pellegrino (1977). I Padri delta Chiesa hanno qualcosa da dire all'uomo d'oggi? Augustinianum 17 (3):453-460.
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  2.  7
    Michele Card Pellegrino (1971). I Padri della Chiesa e i problemi della cultura. Augustinianum 11 (1):5-20.
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  3.  1
    Michele S. Mondani, James W. Pellegrino & William F. Battig (1973). Free and Cued Recall as a Function of Different Levels of Word Processing. Journal of Experimental Psychology 101 (2):324.
  4.  2
    Michele Pellegrino (1960). Aspectos pedagógicos de las" Confesiones" de San Agustín. Augustinus: Revista Trimestral Publicada Por Los Padres Agustinos Recoletos 17:53-63.
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  5.  1
    Gilles O. Einstein, James W. Pellegrino, Michele S. Mondani & William F. Battig (1974). Free-Recall Performance as a Function of Overt Rehearsal Frequency. Journal of Experimental Psychology 103 (3):440.
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  6. Michele Pellegrino (1956). Un antico maestro della carità. Studium 52:489-494.
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  7. Todd Calder, Claudia Card, Ann Cudd, Eric Kraemer, Alice MacLachlan, Sarah Clark Miller, María Pía Lara, Robin May Schott, Laurence Thomas & Lynne Tirrell (2009). Evil, Political Violence, and Forgiveness: Essays in Honor of Claudia Card. Lexington Books.
    Rather than focusing on political and legal debates surrounding attempts to determine if and when genocidal rape has taken place in a particular setting, this essay turns instead to a crucial, yet neglected area of inquiry: the moral significance of genocidal rape, and more specifically, the nature of the harms that constitute the culpable wrongdoing that genocidal rape represents. In contrast to standard philosophical accounts, which tend to employ an individualistic framework, this essay offers a situated understanding of harm that (...)
     
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  8. Edmund D. Pellegrino (2008). The Philosophy of Medicine Reborn: A Pellegrino Reader. University of Notre Dame Press.
    What the philosophy of medicine is -- Philosophy of medicine: should it be teleologically or socially construed? -- The internal morality of clinical medicine: a paradigm for the ethics of the helping and healing professions -- Humanistic basis of professional ethics -- The commodification of medical and health care: the moral consequences of a paradigm shift from a professional to a market ethic -- Medicine today: its identity, its role, and the role of physicians -- From medical ethics to a (...)
     
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  9.  2
    E. D. Pellegrino (1996). Edmund D. Pellegrino on the Future of Bioethics. Interview by David C Thomasma. Cambridge Quarterly of Healthcare Ethics 6 (4):373-375.
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  10.  1
    E. D. Pellegrino (2009). Foni Phronimos--An Interview with Edmund D. Pellegrino by James Giordano. Philosophy, Ethics, and Humanities in Medicine: Pehm 5:16-16.
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  11.  6
    R. M. Dawkins (1933). Michele Pellegrino: La Poesia di S. Gregorio Nazianzeno. (Pubblicazioni della Università Cattolica del Sacro Cuore. Serie quarta: Scienze filologiche. Volume XIII.) Pp. 109. Milan: 'Vita e Pensiero,' 1932. Paper, L. 8. [REVIEW] The Classical Review 47 (04):152-153.
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  12.  76
    Claudia Card (2002). The Atrocity Paradigm: A Theory of Evil. Oxford University Press.
    What distinguishes evils from ordinary wrongs? Is hatred a necessarily evil? Are some evils unforgivable? Are there evils we should tolerate? What can make evils hard to recognize? Are evils inevitable? How can we best respond to and live with evils? Claudia Card offers a secular theory of evil that responds to these questions and more. Evils, according to her theory, have two fundamental components. One component is reasonably foreseeable intolerable harm -- harm that makes a life indecent and (...)
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  13. Edmund D. Pellegrino (1988). For the Patient's Good: The Restoration of Beneficence in Health Care. Oxford University Press.
    In this companion volume to their 1981 work, A Philosophical Basis of Medical Practice, Pellegrino and Thomasma examine the principle of beneficence and its role in the practice of medicine. Their analysis, which is grounded in a thorough-going philosophy of medicine, addresses a wide array of practical and ethical concerns that are a part of health care decision-making today. Among these issues are the withdrawing and withholding of nutrition and hydration, competency assessment, the requirements for valid surrogate decision-making, quality-of-life (...)
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  14. Claudia Card (2007). Gay Divorce: Thoughts on the Legal Regulation of Marriage. Hypatia 22 (1):24-38.
    : Although the exclusion of LGBTs from the rites and rights of marriage is arbitrary and unjust, the legal institution of marriage is itself so riddled with injustice that it would be better to create alternative forms of durable intimate partnership that do not invoke the power of the state. Card's essay develops a case for this position, taking up an injustice sufficiently serious to constitute an evil: the sheltering of domestic violence.
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  15. Claudia Card (2005). The Atrocity Paradigm: A Theory of Evil. Oxford University Press Usa.
    What distinguishes evils from ordinary wrongs? Are some evils unforgivable? How should we respond to evils? Card offers a secular theory of evil--representing a compromise between classic utilitarian and stoic approaches--that responds to these and other questions.
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  16. Claudia Card (2010). Confronting Evils: Terrorism, Torture, Genocide. Cambridge University Press.
    In this contribution to philosophical ethics, Claudia Card revisits the theory of evil developed in her earlier book The Atrocity Paradigm, and expands it to consider collectively perpetrated and collectively suffered atrocities. Redefining evil as a secular concept and focusing on the inexcusability - rather than the culpability - of atrocities, Card examines the tension between responding to evils and preserving humanitarian values. This stimulating and often provocative book contends that understanding the evils in terrorism, torture and genocide (...)
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  17.  6
    Michele Goodwin (2008). Review of L. Prograis and E. Pellegrino, Eds., African American Bioethics: Culture, Race, and Identity. [REVIEW] American Journal of Bioethics 8 (11):52-54.
  18.  2
    Michele Cattane, Luigi Luca Cavalli-Sforza, Luigi Zanzi & Daniele Chiffi (2013). Benedetto XVI (Joseph Ratzinger), Una nuova cultura per un nuovo uma-nesimo, a cura di Lorenzo Lezzi, Presentazione di Agostino Card. Vallino, Libreria Editrice Vaticana 2011, pp. 168. Francesca Bonicalzi, Paolo Mottana, Carlo Vinti, Jean-Jacques Wunenbur-ger (a cura di), Bachelard e le 'provocazioni'della materia, il melangolo. [REVIEW] Epistemologia 36:169-171.
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  19. Edmund D. Pellegrino (1993). The Virtues in Medical Practice. Oxford University Press.
    In recent years, virtue theories have enjoyed a renaissance of interest among general and medical ethicists. This book offers a virtue-based ethic for medicine, the health professions, and health care. Beginning with a historical account of the concept of virtue, the authors construct a theory of the place of the virtues in medical practice. Their theory is grounded in the nature and ends of medicine as a special kind of human activity. The concepts of virtue, the virtues, and the virtuous (...)
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  20. Robert F. Card (2007). Conscientious Objection and Emergency Contraception. American Journal of Bioethics 7 (6):8 – 14.
    This article argues that practitioners have a professional ethical obligation to dispense emergency contraception, even given conscientious objection to this treatment. This recent controversy affects all medical professionals, including physicians as well as pharmacists. This article begins by analyzing the option of referring the patient to another willing provider. Objecting professionals may conscientiously refuse because they consider emergency contraception to be equivalent to abortion or because they believe contraception itself is immoral. This article critically evaluates these reasons and concludes that (...)
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  21.  20
    Claudia Card (1996). The Unnatural Lottery: Character and Moral Luck. Temple.
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  22. Claudia Card (2004). The Atrocity Paradigm Revisited. Hypatia 19 (4):212 - 222.
    This essay reflects on issues raised by commentators regarding my book, The Atrocity Paradigm: A Theory of Evil (Oxford 2002). They are (1) Robin Schott's observation of the tension between my discussion of forgiveness and of castration fantasies; (2) Bat-Ami Bar On's questions regarding whether evil is ethical, political, or both; (3) Adam Morton's queries regarding the relative seriousness of evils and injustices; and (4) María Pía Lara's concerns regarding what is valuable in Kant's ethics.
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  23. Edmund D. Pellegrino (1981). A Philosophical Basis of Medical Practice: Toward a Philosophy and Ethic of the Healing Professions. Oxford University Press.
     
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  24.  40
    Claudia Card (2010). Confronting Evils: Terrorism, Torture, Genocide. Cambridge University Press.
    Machine generated contents note: Part I. The Concept of Evil: 1. Inexcusable wrongs; 2. Between good and evil; 3. Complicity in structural evils; 4. To whom (or to what?) can evils be done?; Part II. Terrorism, Torture, Genocide: 5. Counterterrorism; 6. Low-profile terrorism; 7. Conscientious torture?; 8. Ordinary torture; 9. Genocide is social death; 10. Genocide by forced impregnation; Bibliography; Filmography; Websites; Index.
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  25.  90
    Claudia Card (1990). Caring and Evil. Hypatia 5 (1):101-108.
  26. Edmund D. Pellegrino (2001). The Internal Morality of Clinical Medicine: A Paradigm for the Ethics of the Helping and Healing Professions. Journal of Medicine and Philosophy 26 (6):559 – 579.
    The moral authority for professional ethics in medicine customarily rests in some source external to medicine, i.e., a pre-existing philosophical system of ethics or some form of social construction, like consensus or dialogue. Rather, internal morality is grounded in the phenomena of medicine, i.e., in the nature of the clinical encounter between physician and patient. From this, a philosophy of medicine is derived which gives moral force to the duties, virtues and obligations of physicians qua physicians. Similarly, an ethic specific (...)
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  27.  85
    E. D. Pellegrino (1980). Editorial: Comments, Critiques and Countercritiques. Journal of Medicine and Philosophy 5 (3):169-171.
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  28.  86
    Edmund D. Pellegrino (2006). Toward a Reconstruction of Medical Morality. American Journal of Bioethics 6 (2):65 - 71.
    At the center of medical morality is the healing relationship. It is defined by three phenomena: the fact of illness, the act of profession, and the act of medicine. The first puts the patient in a vulnerable and dependent position; it results in an unequal relationship. The second implies a promise to help. The third involves those actions that will lead to a medically competent healing decision. But it must also be good for the patient in the fullest possible sense. (...)
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  29. Claudia Card (1996). Against Marriage and Motherhood. Hypatia 11 (3):1 - 23.
    This essay argues that current advocacy of lesbian and gay rights to legal marriage and parenthood insufficiently criticizes both marriage and motherhood as they are currently practiced and structured by Northern legal institutions. Instead we would do better not to let the State define our intimate unions and parenting would be improved if the power presently concentrated in the hands of one or two guardians were diluted and distributed through an appropriately concerned community.
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  30. Edmund D. Pellegrino (2001). Philosophy of Medicine: Should It Be Teleologically or Socially Constructed? Kennedy Institute of Ethics Journal 11 (2):169-180.
  31. Edmund D. Pellegrino (2005). Some Things Ought Never Be Done: Moral Absolutes in Clinical Ethics. [REVIEW] Theoretical Medicine and Bioethics 26 (6):469-486.
    Moral absolutes have little or no moral standing in our morally diverse modern society. Moral relativism is far more palatable for most ethicists and to the public at large. Yet, when pressed, every moral relativist will finally admit that there are some things which ought never be done. It is the rarest of moral relativists that will take rape, murder, theft, child sacrifice as morally neutral choices. In general ethics, the list of those things that must never be done will (...)
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  32.  33
    Robert F. Card (2011). Conscientious Objection, Emergency Contraception, and Public Policy. Journal of Medicine and Philosophy 36 (1):53-68.
    Defenders of medical professionals’ rights to conscientious objection (CO) regarding emergency contraception (EC) draw an analogy to CO in the military. Such professionals object to EC since it has the possibility of harming zygotic life, yet if we accept this analogy and utilize jurisprudence to frame the associated public policy, those who refuse to dispense EC would not have their objection honored. Legal precedent holds that one must consistently object to all forms of the relevant activity. In the case at (...)
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  33. Edmund D. Pellegrino (1999). The Commodification of Medical and Health Care: The Moral Consequences of a Paradigm Shift From a Professional to a Market Ethic. Journal of Medicine and Philosophy 24 (3):243 – 266.
    Commodification of health care is a central tenet of managed care as it functions in the United States. As a result, price, cost, quality, availability, and distribution of health care are increasingly left to the workings of the competitive marketplace. This essay examines the conceptual, ethical, and practical implications of commodification, particularly as it affects the healing relationship between health professionals and their patients. It concludes that health care is not a commodity, that treating it as such is deleterious to (...)
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  34. Claudia F. Card (ed.) (1999). Feminist Ethics and Politics. University Press of Kansas.
  35. Claudia Card (2003). Genocide and Social Death. Hypatia 18 (1):63-79.
    : Social death, central to the evil of genocide (whether the genocide is homicidal or primarily cultural), distinguishes genocide from other mass murders. Loss of social vitality is loss of identity and thereby of meaning for one's existence. Seeing social death at the center of genocide takes our focus off body counts and loss of individual talents, directing us instead to mourn losses of relationships that create community and give meaning to the development of talents.
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  36.  26
    Peter Singer, Edmund Pellegrino & Mark Siegler (2001). Clinical Ethics Revisited. BMC Medical Ethics 2 (1):1-8.
    A decade ago, we reviewed the field of clinical ethics; assessed its progress in research, education, and ethics committees and consultation; and made predictions about the future of the field. In this article, we revisit clinical ethics to examine our earlier observations, highlight key developments, and discuss remaining challenges for clinical ethics, including the need to develop a global perspective on clinical ethics problems.
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  37.  21
    Robert F. Card (2005). Individual Responsibility Within Organizational Contexts. Journal of Business Ethics 62 (4):397 - 405.
  38. Edmund D. Pellegrino (2001). Physician-Assisted Suicide and Euthanasia: Rebuttals of Rebuttals the Moral Prohibition Remains. Journal of Medicine and Philosophy 26 (1):93 – 100.
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  39.  35
    Robert F. Card (2014). Reasonability and Conscientious Objection in Medicine: A Reply to Marsh and an Elaboration of the Reason‐Giving Requirement. Bioethics 28 (6):320-326.
    In this paper I defend the Reasonability View: the position that medical professionals seeking a conscientious exemption must state reasons in support of their objection and allow those reasons to be subject to evaluation. Recently, this view has been criticized by Jason Marsh as proposing a standard that is either too difficult to meet or too easy to satisfy. First, I defend the Reasonability View from this proposed dilemma. Then, I develop this view by presenting and explaining some of the (...)
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  40.  98
    Robert D. Orr, Norman Pang, Edmund D. Pellegrino & Mark Siegler (1997). Use of the Hippocratic Oath: A Review of Twentieth Century Practice and a Content Analysis of Oaths Administered in Medical Schools in the US and Canada in 1993. [REVIEW] Journal of Clinical Ethics 8 (4):377.
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  41.  48
    Claudia Card (1988). Gratitude and Obligation. American Philosophical Quarterly 25 (2):115 - 127.
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  42.  88
    Claudia Card (1996). Rape as a Weapon of War. Hypatia 11 (4):5 - 18.
    This essay examines how rape of women and girls by male soldiers works as a martial weapon. Continuities with other torture and terrorism and with civilian rape are suggested. The inadequacy of past philosophical treatments of the enslavement of war captives is briefly discussed. Social strategies are suggested for responding and a concluding fantasy offered, not entirely social, of a strategy to change the meanings of rape to undermine its use as a martial weapon.
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  43.  81
    E. D. Pellegrino (1976). Medicine, Philosophy, and the Image of Man. Journal of Medicine and Philosophy 1 (2):101-103.
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  44.  20
    Claudia Card (ed.) (2003). The Cambridge Companion to Simone De Beauvoir. Cambridge University Press.
    Simone de Beauvoir was a philosopher and writer of notable range and influence whose work is central to feminist theory, French existentialism, and contemporary moral and social philosophy. The essays in this volume examine all the major aspects of her thought, including her views on issues such as the role of biology, sexuality and sexual difference, and evil, the influence on her work of Heidegger, Sartre, Merleau-Ponty, Husserl, and others, and the philosophical significance of her memoirs and fiction. New readers (...)
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  45.  67
    Edmund D. Pellegrino (1979). Toward a Reconstruction of Medical Morality: The Primacy of the Act of Profession and the Fact of Illness. Journal of Medicine and Philosophy 4 (1):32-56.
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  46.  72
    Edmund D. Pellegrino (2006). Bioethics and Politics: "Doing Ethics" in the Public Square. Journal of Medicine and Philosophy 31 (6):569 – 584.
    “Hence it is necessary for a Prince wishing to hold his own to know how to do wrong and to make use of it according to necessity.”—Machiavelli“Every state is a community of some kind and every community is established with a view to some good…”—Aristotle.
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  47.  16
    Robert F. Card (2012). Is There No Alternative? Conscientious Objection by Medical Students. Journal of Medical Ethics 38 (10):602-604.
    Recent survey data gathered from British medical students reveal widespread acceptance of conscientious objection in medicine, despite the existence of strict policies in the UK that discourage conscientious refusals by students to aspects of their medical training. This disconnect demonstrates a pressing need to thoughtfully examine policies that allow conscience objections by medical students; as it so happens, the USA is one country that has examples of such policies. After presenting some background on promulgated US conscience protections and reflecting on (...)
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  48.  70
    Edmund D. Pellegrino (2000). Bioethics at Century's Turn: Can Normative Ethics Be Retrieved? Journal of Medicine and Philosophy 25 (6):655 – 675.
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  49.  90
    Claudia Card (2006). The L Word and the F Word. Hypatia 21 (2):223-229.
  50. Claudia Card (2003). Questions Regarding a War on Terrorism. Hypatia 18 (1):164 - 169.
    : The concept of a war on terrorism creates havoc with attempts to apply rules of war. For "terrorism" is not an agent. Nor is it clear what relationship to terrorism agents must have in order to be legitimate targets. Nor is it clear what kinds of terrorism count. Would a war on terrorism in the home be a justifiable response to domestic battering? If not, do similar objections apply to a war on public terrorism?
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