Search results for 'Michelle Cunningham' (try it on Scholar)

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  1.  33
    Michelle Cunningham (2010). Research Ethics in a Business School Context: The Establishment of a Review Committee and the Primary Issues of Concern. [REVIEW] Journal of Academic Ethics 8 (1):43-66.
    This paper describes the establishment of and the issues experienced by the Research Ethics Committee (REC) of a Business School within a University in Ireland. It identifies the issue of voluntarily given informed consent as a key challenge for RECs operating in a Business School context. The paper argues that whilst the typology of ethical issues in business research are similar to the wider social sciences, the fact that much research is carried out in the workplace adds to the complexity (...)
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  2.  52
    A. Cunningham (2001). A Reply to Peter Dear's 'Religion, Science and Natural Philosophy: Thoughts on Cunningham's Thesis'. Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part A 32 (2):387-391.
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  3.  7
    Anne Cunningham (2003). Autonomous Consumption: Buying Into the Ideology of Capitalism\011Anne Cunningham. [REVIEW] Journal of Business Ethics 48 (3):229-236.
    The purpose of this article is to examine three different approaches to autonomy in order to demonstrate how each leads to a different conclusion about the ethicality of advertising. I contend that Noggle's belief-based autonomy theory provides the most complete understanding of autonomy. Read in conjunction with Arendt's theory of cooperative power, Noggle's theory leads to the conclusion that advertising does not violate consumers' autonomy. Although it is possible for advertisers to abuse the power granted them by society these abuses (...)
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  4.  2
    Richard P. Cunningham (1990). Book Review: Criticizing the Media: An Essay Review by Richard P. Cunningham. [REVIEW] Journal of Mass Media Ethics 5 (1):59 – 63.
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  5.  2
    Richard Cunningham (1996). Book Review: New Books Provide a Sharper Focus on Public Journalism: An Essay Review by Richard Cunningham. [REVIEW] Journal of Mass Media Ethics 11 (3):184 – 191.
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  6. Anthony Cunningham (2013). Modern Honor: A Philosophical Defense. Routledge.
    This book examines the notion of honor with an eye to dissecting its intellectual demise and with the aim of making a case for honor’s rehabilitation. Western intellectuals acknowledge honor’s influence, but they lament its authority. For Western democratic societies to embrace honor, it must be compatible with social ideals like liberty, equality, and fraternity. Cunningham details a conception of honor that can do justice to these ideals. This vision revolves around three elements—character , relationships , and activities and (...)
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  7.  5
    Frank Cunningham (2002). Theories of Democracy. Routledge.
    a critical introduction Frank Cunningham. economic 200; and globality/ globalism 200, 204 group loyalties 62-3 group representation 95-100; challenges 97-100; modes 97; types 96 guild socialism 137 hegemony 190-1,213 Hobbesist 73, ...
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  8.  45
    Conor Cunningham (2002). Genealogy of Nihilism: Philosophies of Nothing and the Difference of Theology. Routledge.
    Nihilism is the logic of nothing as something, which claims that Nothing Is. Its unmaking of things, and its forming of formless things, strain the fundamental terms of existence: what it is to be, to know, to be known. But nihilism, the antithesis of God, is also like theology. Where nihilism creates nothingness, condenses it to substance, God also makes nothingness creative. Negotiating the borders of spirit and substance, theology can ask the questions of nihilism that other disciplines do not (...)
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  9.  7
    Anthony Cunningham (2001). The Heart of What Matters: The Role for Literature in Moral Philosophy. University of California Press.
    The Heart of What Matters shows that literature has a powerful and unique role to play in understanding life's deepest ethical problems. Anthony Cunningham provides a rigorous critique of Kantian ethics, which has enjoyed a preeminent place in moral philosophy in the United States, arguing that it does not do justice to the reality of our lives. He demonstrates how fine literature can play an important role in honing our capacity to see clearly and choose wisely as he develops (...)
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  10.  3
    Frank Cunningham (1989). [Book Review] Democratic Theory and Socialism. [REVIEW] Science and Society 53 (3):490-492.
    This book is an important contribution to the theory of democracy and socialism. The underlying question it poses is: how, if at all, can one have both socialism and democracy? In posing an answer to this question, Professor Cunningham addresses the following topics: the definition of democracy and whether socialism is necessary to its progress: the socialist retrieval of liberal democracy associated with the work of C. B. Macpherson: the political consciousness that Gramsci placed at the center of socialist (...)
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  11. Frank Cunningham (2001). Theories of Democracy: A Critical Introduction. Routledge.
    This is the first book to be published in this exciting new series on political philosophy. Cunningham provides a critical and clear introduction to the main contemporary approaches to democracy: participatory democracy, classic and radical pluralism, deliberative democracy, catallaxy, and others. Also discussed are theorists in the background of current democratic thought, such as Tocqueville, Mill, and Rousseau. The book includes applications of democratic theories including an extended discussion of democracy and globalisation.
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  12.  8
    Frank Cunningham (2008). Globalization and Developmental Democracy. Ethical Perspectives 15 (4):487-505.
    Frank Cunningham discusses the idea that there is no universal form of democracy, in his contribution on MacPherson, “Globalization and developmental democracy”. Working at a time in which colonial attitudes had not yet been radically questioned, MacPherson analyzed the democratic potential of peoples that were, in Western eyes, still deemed too immature for self-government. MacPherson’s theoretical framework was particularly suited to such an endeavour, because his definition of democracy did not focus on narrow institutional characteristics. Democracy, according to MacPherson’s (...)
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  13. David E. Cunningham (2011). Barriers to Peace in Civil War. Cambridge University Press.
    Civil wars vary greatly in their duration. This book argues that conflicts are longer when they involve more actors who can block agreement and identifies specific problems that arise in multi-party bargaining. Quantitative analysis of over 200 civil wars since World War II reveals that conflicts with more of these actors last much longer than those with fewer. Detailed comparison of negotiations in Rwanda and Burundi demonstrates that multi-party negotiations present additional barriers to peace not found in two party conflicts. (...)
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  14. Lawrence S. Cunningham (ed.) (2009). Intractable Disputes About the Natural Law: Alasdair Macintyre and Critics. University of Notre Dame Press.
    Both as cardinal and as Pope Benedict XVI, one of Josef Ratzinger's consistent concerns has been the foundational moral imperatives of the natural law. In 2004, then Cardinal Ratzinger requested that the University of Notre Dame study the complex issues embedded in discussions about "natural rights" and "natural law" in the context of Catholic thinking. To that end, Alasdair MacIntyre provided a substantive essay on the foundational problem of moral disagreements concerning natural law, and eight scholars were invited to respond (...)
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  15. Anthony Cunningham (2015). Modern Honor: A Philosophical Defense. Routledge.
    This book examines the notion of honor with an eye to dissecting its intellectual demise and with the aim of making a case for honor’s rehabilitation. Western intellectuals acknowledge honor’s influence, but they lament its authority. For Western democratic societies to embrace honor, it must be compatible with social ideals like liberty, equality, and fraternity. Cunningham details a conception of honor that can do justice to these ideals. This vision revolves around three elements—character, relationships, and activities and accomplishment. Taken (...)
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  16. W. Cunningham (1918). The Common Weal. — Six lectures on political Philosophy. Revue Philosophique de la France Et de l'Etranger 86:158-159.
    William Cunningham was a prominent British economist and economic historian. In this book, which was first published in 1917, Cunningham provides a concise guide to various aspects of political philosophy, with a particular focus on British political institutions. Appendices are included and textual notes are incorporated throughout. This book will be of value to anyone with an interest in political philosophy and the nature of governance.
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  17. Frank Cunningham (2001). Theories of Democracy: A Critical Introduction. Routledge.
    This is the first book to be published in this exciting new series on political philosophy. Cunningham provides a critical and clear introduction to the main contemporary approaches to democracy: participatory democracy, classic and radical pluralism, deliberative democracy, catallaxy, and others. Also discussed are theorists in the background of current democratic thought, such as Tocqueville, Mill, and Rousseau. The book includes applications of democratic theories including an extended discussion of democracy and globalisation.
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  18. C. B. Macpherson & Frank Cunningham (2013). Burke, Reissue. OUP Canada.
    One of the twentieth century's most respected political philosophers presents a controversial perspective on the political ideas and intellectual legacy of Edmund Burke. This new edition includes an introduction by Frank Cunningham, placing the book in the broader context of Macpherson's work.
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  19. C. B. Macpherson & Frank Cunningham (2013). The Rise and Fall of Economic Justice and Other Essays, Reissue. OUP Canada.
    In his final book, one of the giants of twentieth-century political philosophy returns to his key themes of state, class, and property to consider such contemporary questions as economic justice, human rights, and the nature of industrial democracy. This new edition includes an introduction by Frank Cunningham, placing the book in the broader context of Macpherson's work.
     
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  20. Andrew Watson & Ian Cunningham (eds.) (2003). Medieval Manuscripts in British Libraries: Volume V: Indexes and Addenda. Oxford University Press Uk.
    The four volumes of Neil Ker's Medieval Manuscripts in British Libraries were published by Oxford University Press between 1969 and 1992. They comprise a catalogue of about 3,000 manuscripts in Latin and Western European vernaculars in hitherto uncatalogued or inadequately catalogued institutional collections in the United Kingdom and form a major research tool for humanist scholars. The index volume, produced under the direction of A. G. Watson, a former pupil of Ker's and now his literary executor, and I. C. (...), formerly Keeper of Manuscripts in the National Library of Scotland, provides a variety of indexes, including authors/titles; owners; geographical origins and dates of manuscripts; vernacular manuscripts; Latin and vernacular incipits; manuscripts cited; repertories cited; and iconography. There are also lists of recent accessions to libraries and of manuscripts that have migrated from one institution to another. (shrink)
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  21. David Cunningham (2005). The Futures of Surrealism: Hegelianism, Romanticism, and the Avant-Garde. Substance 34 (2):47-65.
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  22.  97
    Richard B. Cunningham (forthcoming). Book Review: Theology After Ricoeur: New Directions in Hermeneutical Theology. [REVIEW] Interpretation 57 (1):98-100.
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  23. D. S. Cunningham (2005). Book Review: Theology and Action: After Theory in Christian Ethics. [REVIEW] Studies in Christian Ethics 18 (3):162-166.
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  24. David S. Cunningham (2010). Book Reviews: William T. Cavanaugh, The Myth of Religious Violence: Secular Ideology and the Roots of Modern Conflict (New York and Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2009) Ix + 285 Pp. £32.50 (Hb), ISBN 978—0—19—538504—5. [REVIEW] Studies in Christian Ethics 23 (4):458-462.
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  25.  18
    S. Cunningham, D. Turk, L. MacdonaLd & C. NeilmaCrae (2008). Yours or Mine? Ownership and Memory. Consciousness and Cognition 17 (1):312-318.
    An important function of the self is to identify external objects that are potentially personally relevant. We suggest that such objects may be identified through mere ownership. Extant research suggests that encoding information in a self-relevant context enhances memory , thus an experiment was designed to test the impact of ownership on memory performance. Participants either moved or observed the movement of picture cards into two baskets; one of which belonged to self and one which belonged to another participant. A (...)
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  26.  18
    Lindsay McShane & Peggy Cunningham (2012). To Thine Own Self Be True? Employees' Judgments of the Authenticity of Their Organization's Corporate Social Responsibility Program. Journal of Business Ethics 108 (1):81-100.
    Despite recognizing the importance of developing authentic corporate social responsibility (CSR) programs, noticeably absent from the literature is consideration for how employees distinguish between authentic and inauthentic CSR programs. This is somewhat surprising given that employees are essentially the face of their organization and are largely expected to act as ambassadors for the organization’s CSR program (Collier and Esteban in Bus Ethics 16:19–33, 2007 ). The current research, by conducting depth interviews with employees, builds a better understanding of how employees (...)
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  27.  8
    Myron Charles Baker & Michael A. Cunningham (1985). The Biology of Bird-Song Dialects. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 8 (1):85-100.
  28.  92
    R. L. Cunningham (1966). Is It Necessary or Useful to Randomize? Analysis 26 (3):103 -.
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  29.  16
    Osborne P. Wiggins, John H. Barker, Serge Martinez, Marieke Vossen, Claudio Maldonado, Federico V. Grossi, Cedric G. Francois, Michael Cunningham, Gustavo Perez-Abadia, Moshe Kon & Joseph C. Banis (2004). On the Ethics of Facial Transplantation Research. American Journal of Bioethics 4 (3):1 – 12.
    Transplantation continues to push the frontiers of medicine into domains that summon forth troublesome ethical questions. Looming on the frontier today is human facial transplantation. We develop criteria that, we maintain, must be satisfied in order to ethically undertake this as-yet-untried transplant procedure. We draw on the criteria advanced by Dr. Francis Moore in the late 1980s for introducing innovative procedures in transplant surgery. In addition to these we also insist that human face transplantation must meet all the ethical requirements (...)
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  30. G. W. Cunningham (1908). Determinism and Indeterminism in Motives: A Rejoinder. Philosophical Review 17 (1):66-67.
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  31.  85
    Thomas V. Cunningham (2013). Skepticism About the “Convertibility” of Induced Pluripotent Stem Cells. American Journal of Bioethics 13 (1):40-42.
    No abstract available. First paragraph: In this issue’s target article, Stier and Schoene-Siefert purport to ‘depotentialize’ the argument from potentiality based on their claim that any human cell may be “converted” into a morally significant entity, and consequently, the argument from potentiality finally succumbs to a reductio ad absurdum. I aim to convey two reasons for skepticism about the innocuousness of the notion of cell convertibility, and hence, the cogency of their argument.
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  32.  87
    Andrew Cunningham (1988). Getting the Game Right: Some Plain Words on the Identity and Invention of Science. Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part A 19 (3):365-389.
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  33.  18
    Terry Beckman, Alison Colwell & Peggy H. Cunningham (2009). The Emergence of Corporate Social Responsibility in Chile: The Importance of Authenticity and Social Networks. [REVIEW] Journal of Business Ethics 86 (2):191 - 206.
    Little is known about how and why corporate social responsibility (CSR) emerged in lesser developed countries. In order to address this knowledge gap, we used Chile as a test case and conducted a series of in-depth interviews with leaders of CSR initiatives. We also did an Internet and literature search to help provide support for the findings that emerged from our data. We discovered that while there are similarities in the drivers of CSR in developed countries, there are distinct differences (...)
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  34.  20
    Andrew Cunningham (1997). Mind and Morality. Review of Metaphysics 51 (1):140-140.
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  35.  80
    Bryon Cunningham (2001). The Reemergence of 'Emergence'. Philosophy of Science 3 (September):S63-S75.
    A variety of recent philosophical discussions, particularly on topics relating to complexity, have begun to reemploy the concept of 'emergence'. Although multiple concepts of 'emergence' are available, little effort has been made to systematically distinguish them. In this paper, I provide a taxonomy of higher-order properties that (inter alia) distinguishes three classes of emergent properties: (1) ontologically basic properties of complex entities, such as the mythical vital properties, (2) fully configurational properties, such as mental properties as they are conceived of (...)
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  36. Stanley B. Cunningham (1999). Getting It Right: Aristotle's "Golden Mean" as Theory Deterioration. Journal of Mass Media Ethics 14 (1):5 – 15.
    Journalism and media ethics texts commonly invoke Aristotle's Golden Mean as a principal ethical theory that models such journalistic values as balance, fairness, and proportion. Working from Aristotle's text, this article argues that the Golden Mean model, as widely understood and applied to media ethics, seriously belies Aristotle's intent. It also shortchanges the reality of our moral agency and epistemic responsibility. A more authentic rendering of Aristotle's theory of acting rightly, moreover, has profound implications for communication ethicists and media practitioners.
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  37. D. S. Cunningham (1999). Book Reviews : Choosing to Feel: Virtue, Friendship, and Compassion for Friends, by Diana Fritz Cates. University of Notre Dame Press, 1997. Xi + 298 Pp. Hb. US $32.00. ISBN 0-268-00814-. [REVIEW] Studies in Christian Ethics 12 (1):93-96.
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  38.  20
    Lawrence S. Cunningham (2006). On Christian Belief. Augustinian Studies 37 (2):277-278.
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  39.  38
    Donald Cunningham (1983). On Representation. Semiotics:41-48.
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  40.  20
    Nina Cunningham (1979). The Social Determination of Production. The Owl of Minerva 10 (3):11-11.
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  41. Frank Cunningham (1990). Democracy and Socialism: Philosophical Aporiae. Philosophy and Social Criticism 16 (4):269-289.
  42.  17
    Lawrence S. Cunningham (1972). Chesterton Reconsidered. Thought: A Journal of Philosophy 47 (2):271-279.
    Because of his profound sense of wonder and celebration, there is much in Chesterton's religious writings that is fresh and pertinent to contemporary discussion.
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  43.  15
    D. Turk, S. Cunningham & C. MaCrae (2008). Self-Memory Biases in Explicit and Incidental Encoding of Trait Adjectives. Consciousness and Cognition 17 (3):1040-1045.
    An extensive literature has demonstrated that encoding information in a self-referential manner enhances subsequent memory performance. This ‘self-reference effect’ is generally elicited in paradigms that require participants to evaluate the self-descriptiveness of personality characteristics. Extending work of this kind, the current research explored the possibility that explicit evaluative processing is not a necessary precondition for the emergence of this effect. Rather, responses to self cues may enhance item encoding even in the absence of explicit evaluative instructions. We explored this hypothesis (...)
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  44.  36
    Anne Cunningham (2003). Autonomous Consumption: Buying Into the Ideology of Capitalism. [REVIEW] Journal of Business Ethics 48 (3):229 - 236.
    The purpose of this article is to examine three different approaches to autonomy in order to demonstrate how each leads to a different conclusion about the ethicality of advertising. I contend that Noggle''s (1995) belief-based autonomy theory provides the most complete understanding of autonomy. Read in conjunction with Arendt''s theory of cooperative power, Noggle''s theory leads to the conclusion that advertising does not violate consumers'' autonomy. Although it is possible for advertisers to abuse the power granted them by society these (...)
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  45.  17
    David Cunningham (2004). How the Sublime Became “Now”. Symposium: The Canadian Journal of Continental Philosophy 8 (3):549-571.
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  46.  15
    G. Watts Cunningham (1963). Reason and the Common Good. Southern Journal of Philosophy 1 (4):40-41.
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  47.  14
    Frank Cunningham (1997). One For All. Canadian Journal of Philosophy 27 (4):571-594.
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  48.  20
    A. Cunningham (2002). The Pen and the Sword: Recovering the Disciplinary Identity of Physiology and Anatomy Before 1800 - I: Old Physiology-the Pen. Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part C 33 (4):631-665.
    It is argued that the disciplinary identity of anatomy and physiology before 1800 are unknown to us due to the subsequent creation, success and historiographical dominance of a different discipline-experimental physiology. The first of these two papers deals with the identity of physiology from its revival in the 1530s, and demonstrates that it was a theoretical, not an experimental, discipline, achieved with the mind and the pen, not the hand and the knife. The physiological work of Jean Fernel, Albrecht von (...)
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  49.  15
    W. F. Cunningham (1926). The American College and Catholic Education. Thought: A Journal of Philosophy 1 (2):262-278.
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  50.  32
    W. Patrick Cunningham (1998). The Golden Rule as Universal Ethical Norm. Journal of Business Ethics 17 (1):105 - 109.
    "The golden rule" (Matthew 7:12) is a formulation of natural moral law, a logical way to divide good from evil. It has been attacked by J.W. Hennessey, Jr. and Bernard Gert as a "particularist preachment." On the contrary, it remains a useful, universal guide to moral conduct and cannot be considered a self-centered, subjective guide to the moral life. We must agree with Jeffrey Wattles that there are multiple possible meanings to the "rule", some legitimate and some spurious. The legitimate (...)
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