1. Tyler Cowen & Michelle Dawson, What Does the Turing Test Really Mean? And How Many Human Beings (Including Turing) Could Pass?
    The so-called Turing test, as it is usually interpreted, sets a benchmark standard for determining when we might call a machine intelligent. We can call a machine intelligent if the following is satisfied: if a group of wise observers were conversing with a machine through an exchange of typed messages, those observers could not tell whether they were talking to a human being or to a machine. To pass the test, the machine has to be intelligent but it also should (...)
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  2. Laurent Mottron, Michelle Dawson & Isabelle Soulieres (2010). Enhanced Perception in Savant Syndrome: Patterns, Structure, and Creativity. In Francesca Happé & Uta Frith (eds.), Autism and Talent. Oup/the Royal Society.
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  3. Morton Ann Gernsbacher, Michelle Dawson & Laurent Mottron (2006). Autism: Common, Heritable, but Not Harmful. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 29 (4):413-414.
    We assert that one of the examples used by Keller & Miller (K&M), namely, autism, is indeed common, and heritable, but we question whether it is harmful. We provide a brief review of cognitive science literature in which autistics perform superiorly to non-autistics in perceptual, reasoning, and comprehension tasks; however, these superiorities are often occluded and are instead described as dysfunctions. (Published Online November 9 2006).
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