Search results for 'Michelle Ford' (try it on Scholar)

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  1. Steven J. Luck & Michelle Ford (1998). On the Role of Selective Attention in Visual Perception. Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America 95 (3):825-830.
  2. Michelle Hegmon, B. Sunday Eiselt & Richard I. Ford (eds.) (2005). Engaged Anthropology: Research Essays on North American Archaeology, Ethnobotany, and Museology. University of Michigan, Museum of Anthropology.
  3. Robert Ford & Anthony Heath (2004). Legal Regulation of Affirmative Action in Northern Ireland: An Empirical AssessmentA Shorter Version of This Article, Omitting Some of the Detailed Analysis Contained Here, Was Published Earlier As: Christopher McCrudden, Robert Ford and Anthony Heath, The Impact of Affirmative Action Agreement in Bob Osborne and Ian Shuttleworth (Eds), Fair Employment in Northern Ireland: A Generation on (Belfast: Blackstone Press, 2004), 11947. We Are Grateful to the Equality Commission for Northern Ireland F. [REVIEW] Oxford Journal of Legal Studies 24 (3):363-415.
     
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  4.  1
    Lewis S. Ford (1983). An Alternative to Creatio Ex Nihilo: LEWIS S. FORD. Religious Studies 19 (2):205-213.
    For many philosophical thinkers down through the centuries, the notion of a creation out of sheer nothing has been found to be quite unintelligible. Nevertheless the idea of creation preserves an important insight and needs to be freed from the difficulties of this traditional formulation. Alfred North Whitehead has offered an alternative theory of creation worth exploring: each individual actuality creates itself out of prior creative acts. God then serves to direct this creative process.
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  5.  1
    Lewis S. Ford (1972). The Incarnation as a Contingent Reality: A Reply to Dr. Pailin: LEWIS S. FORD. Religious Studies 8 (2):169-174.
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  6. Lewis S. Ford (1994). David Ray Griffin, John B. Cobb, Jr., Marcus Ford, Pete A.Y. Gunter, and Peter Ochs, "Founders of Constructive Postmodern Philosophy: Peirce, James, Bergson, Whitehead and Hartshone". [REVIEW] Transactions of the Charles S. Peirce Society 30 (1):220.
     
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  7. Norman M. Ford (1988). When Did I Begin?: Conception of the Human Individual in History, Philosophy, and Science. Cambridge University Press.
    When Did I Begin? investigates the theoretical, moral, and biological issues surrounding the debate over the beginning of human life. With the continuing controversy over the use of in vitro fertilization techniques and experimentation with human embryos, these issues have been forced into the arena of public debate. Following a detailed analysis of the history of the question, Reverend Ford argues that a human individual could not begin before definitive individuation occurs with the appearance of the primitive streak about (...)
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  8. Dennis Ford (2008). The Search for Meaning: A Short History. University of California Press.
    In _The Search for Meaning: A Short History, _Dennis Ford explores eight approaches human beings have pursued over time to invest life with meaning and to infuse order into a seemingly chaotic universe. These include myth, philosophy, science, postmodernism, pragmatism, archetypal psychology, metaphysics, and naturalism. In engaging, companionable prose, Ford boils down these systems to their bare essentials, showing the difference between viewing the world from a religious point of view and that of a naturalist, and comparing a (...)
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  9. David Ford (2007). Shaping Theology: Engagements in a Religious and Secular World. Blackwell Pub..
    Ford has developed the relationship between theology and each of these other spheres, but this is the first volume to bring together a complete and well-rounded account of theology's interaction with all its conversation partners. An innovative book about the shape of theology in reaction to its relationship with the Church, with theologians, with other religions, and with the university Written by David Ford, recognized internationally as one of the most creative of contemporary theologians Considers how theology shapes (...)
     
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  10.  21
    Norman M. Ford (2013). Care of Human Health and Life and its Reasonable Limits: A Catholic Perspective. The Australasian Catholic Record 90 (2):172.
    Ford, Norman M Doctors and nurses understand the personal dignity of their patients and their natural desire to be healthy and happy. The aged with failing memories or mental impairments are persons whose dignity and moral worth remain intact. They also know patients differ in their personal circumstances, their faith, their stages of life's journey and their attitude to sickness and approach of death. This awareness enables them to adequately perform their valuable professional services from a subject centred perspective (...)
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  11.  4
    Norman Ford (2015). Understanding the Persistent Vegetative State and the Ethics of Care for its Patients. Australasian Catholic Record, The 92 (3):317.
    Ford, Norman In 1972 Brian Jennett and Fred Plum recommended the term 'persistent vegetative state' to describe a state of continuing 'wakefulness without awareness', which can follow a variety of severe insults to the brain. Their description of the syndrome has stood the test of time, but PVS continues to be a source of medical, legal, and ethical debate.
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  12.  5
    Norman Ford (2011). HIV Infection Prevention and Catholic Moral Principles. The Australasian Catholic Record 88 (3):318.
    Ford, Norman There has been some confusion in the media over what Pope Benedict XVI meant by his comments on the use of condoms. He was discussing acts of sexual intercourse performed by male prostitutes in relation to HIV (human immune deficiency virus) infection in reply to a question put to him during an interview with Peter Seewald. The Vatican spokesman Fr Lombardi SJ said the Pope 'had confirmed to him that the example was valid in the case of (...)
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  13.  5
    James E. Ford (1978). On Thinking About Aristotle's "Thought". Critical Inquiry 4 (3):589-596.
    An adequate approach to any of Aristotle's qualitative parts of tragedy must be grounded in an understanding of their hierarchical ranking within the Poetics. Any "whole" must present "a certain order in its arrangement of parts" ,1 and in a drama each part is "for the sake of" the one "above" it. Contrary to Rosenstein's formulation, for instance, the Aristotelian view is that character as a form "concretizes" and individualizes thought as matter. Rosenstein's question as to whether "these . . (...)
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  14.  6
    Norman Ford (2011). Induced Pluripotent Stem Cells. Chisholm Health Ethics Bulletin 16 (4):4.
    Ford, Norman Many people think that the Catholic Church is morally opposed to all research and therapeutic use of stem cells. This is far from the truth. The Church is rightly morally opposed to all destructive use of human embryos to obtain pluripotent embryonic stem cells, but it is not opposed to pluripotent stem cells ethically derived from adult cells.
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  15.  4
    Norman Ford (2007). Catholic Health Care and Its Ethical Challenges. Chisholm Health Ethics Bulletin 12 (4):1.
    Ford, Norman Catholic healthcare facilities fulfil their mission in the world of the sick and dying of all ages. Challenges occasionally arise to remain faithful to their identity and mission in a world whose ethical standards are changing. This article discusses the nature of the challenges ahead.
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  16.  8
    Lewis S. Ford (2002). Can Thomas and Whitehead Complement Each Other? American Catholic Philosophical Quarterly 76 (3):491-502.
    Two essays relating Thomas and Whitehead have recently appeared. Coming To Be by James W. Felt, S.J., modifies Thomas by replacing his substantial form with Whitehead’s notion of subjective aim, the essencein-the-making introduced by God to guide the occasion’s act of coming into being. Felt also substitutes subjective aim for matter as the means of individuation. This is one of Whitehead’s individuating principles, although a case can be made that matter (the multiplicity of past actualities as proximate matter) is another. (...)
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  17.  5
    Norman Ford (2006). Cooperation in Unethical Actions of Others. Chisholm Health Ethics Bulletin 12 (1):1.
    Ford, Norman Lord Brennan, a Catholic Lawyer, chaired an inquiry into the allegations following criticism of certain unethical practices performed in St John and Elizabeth, a large London Catholic Private Hospital, thus providing an opportunity to reflect on the ethics of cooperating in the unethical actions of others. It is recommended that the opinion of a hospital's select group of staff, an ethicist and/or moral theologian would help discern when a proportionately critical cause justifies cooperation and hence collusion with (...)
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  18.  5
    Norman Ford (2007). Stem Cells, Altered Nuclear Transfer & Ethics. Chisholm Health Ethics Bulletin 12 (3):9.
    Ford, Norman Once therapies using embryonic stem cells enter clinical practice, pressure will increase to find pluripotent stem cells for therapeutic purposes that are not derived from human embryos. This article explores several likely sources of such pluripotent cells.
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  19.  3
    Norman Ford (2005). Medically Administered Nutrition and Hydration and Ethics. Chisholm Health Ethics Bulletin 11 (1):9.
    Ford, Norman The basic moral principle in health care requires us to have medical treatment that is reasonably required in the circumstances to restore health or to save life. It is the responsibility of healthcare professionals to interpret this duty in dialogue with their patients.
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  20.  3
    Norman Ford (2007). Stop Press: Human Cloning Bill in Victorian Parliament. Chisholm Health Ethics Bulletin 12 (3):12.
    Ford, Norman Victoria's Minister for Health, the Hon. Bronwyn Pike MLA introduced a Bill to allow therapeutic cloning in Victoria on March 13, 2007. If this Bill is passed, Victoria would be the first State to permit somatic cell nuclear transfer (therapeutic cloning) and thereby open the way for the destruction of cloned human embryos for therapeutic purposes and medical research.
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  21.  3
    Norman Ford (2006). Moral Worth and Inviolability of Unborn Children. Chisholm Health Ethics Bulletin 11 (3):1.
    Ford, Norman The moral worth and dignity of the unborn child varies according to peoples' fundamental religious and personal beliefs on what constitutes a human person. The antithetical views on the moral value of the unborn child are due to different philosophies, which admits the existence and meaningfulness of nonmaterial reality and the other that practically denies both.
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  22.  3
    Norman Ford (2005). Ethical Issues in the Management of Bird Flu Pandemic. Chisholm Health Ethics Bulletin 11 (2):4.
    Ford, Norman Following on from the previous article by Anne Moates, I will take for granted the need for all infected birds to be tracked down and destroyed. I am assuming the scenario that some human beings may be infected by a mutated form of the highly pathogenic H5N1 avian influenza so that this modified bird flu virus can be transmitted from human to human by social contact. Some of the ethical issues that arise in this possible scenario need (...)
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  23.  4
    Norman M. Ford (2012). Catholicism and Human Reproduction: An Historical Overview. The Australasian Catholic Record 89 (1):49.
    Ford, Norman M Throughout history Catholics held the commonly accepted views of the times regarding human reproduction, and these views changed as advances were made in scientific knowledge. Hence, it would be best to begin with Aristotle's views on human reproduction.
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  24.  2
    Norman Ford (2006). Impact of Spirituality on Making Ethical Healthcare Decisions. Chisholm Health Ethics Bulletin 11 (4):1.
    Ford, Norman Details of a speech given during a conference called 'Health Care Towards the End of Life, Ethics and Spirituality', organised by the Caroline Chisholm Centre for Health Ethics and held at St Vincent's Hospital on May 23, 2006 are presented. The topic of the conference was the impact of spirituality on making healthcare decisions. Special consideration to the relationship of patients' conscience and autonomy to their spirituality, religious beliefs or lack thereof was recommended considering some beliefs of (...)
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  25.  1
    Norman Ford (2006). Planning Future Health Care. Chisholm Health Ethics Bulletin 12 (2):7.
    Ford, Norman This is an article to introduce readers to the issue of people planning their options for future health care and medical treatment, and the importance of taking it seriously and acting on it.
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  26.  4
    Norman Ford (1989). A Reply to Michael Goughlan. Bioethics 3 (4):342–346.
    Ford's book on the question of when human personhood begins, When Did I Begin? Conception of the Human Individual in History, Philosophy and Science (Cambridge University Press; 1988), is reviewed by Michael J. Coughlan in this issue of Bioethics. Here Ford responds to Coughlan's review, focusing on three topics: the importance of rationality for personhood, how far back one can trace the ontological identity of what is indisputably a human individual and human person, and the difference between the (...)
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  27. Maureen Ford (2007). Situating Knowledges as Coalition Work. Educational Theory 57 (3):307-324.
    In this essay Maureen Ford examines a selection of situated knowledges discourses in order to make explicit their attention to political effects. She contends, first, that the “epistemic public” constituted through these discourses are multiple, interactive, performative, and layered, and further that they are explicitly political in ways that are denied by standard epistemological approaches. Furthermore, Ford maintains that the political effects circulated within standard and situated knowledges are epistemologically and educationally significant. Attending to the work of Donna (...)
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  28. Dennis Ford (2007). The Search for Meaning: A Short History. University of California Press.
    In _The Search for Meaning: A Short History, _Dennis Ford explores eight approaches human beings have pursued over time to invest life with meaning and to infuse order into a seemingly chaotic universe. These include myth, philosophy, science, postmodernism, pragmatism, archetypal psychology, metaphysics, and naturalism. In engaging, companionable prose, Ford boils down these systems to their bare essentials, showing the difference between viewing the world from a religious point of view and that of a naturalist, and comparing a (...)
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  29. B. Sunday Eiselt & Michelle Hegmon (2005). Conversations with an Engaged Anthropologist : An Interview with Richard I. Ford. In Michelle Hegmon, B. Sunday Eiselt & Richard I. Ford (eds.), Engaged Anthropology: Research Essays on North American Archaeology, Ethnobotany, and Museology. University of Michigan, Museum of Anthropology
     
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  30.  89
    Robert C. Ford & Woodrow D. Richardson (1994). Ethical Decision Making: A Review of the Empirical Literature. [REVIEW] Journal of Business Ethics 13 (3):205 - 221.
    The authors review the empirical literature in order to assess which variables are postulated as influencing ethical beliefs and decision making. The variables are divided into those unique to the individual decision maker and those considered situational in nature. Variables related to an individual decision maker examined in this review are nationality, religion, sex, age, education, employment, and personality. Situation specific variables examined in this review are referent groups, rewards and sanctions, codes of conduct, type of ethical conflict, organization effects, (...)
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  31. Anton Ford, Jennifer Hornsby & Frederick Stoutland (eds.) (2011). Essays on Anscombe's Intention. Harvard University Press.
    This collection of ten essays elucidates some of the more challenging aspects of Anscombe’s work and affirms her reputation as one of our most original ...
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  32. Lincoln E. Ford (2002). Mechanics of Motor Proteins and the Cytoskeleton (Review). Perspectives in Biology and Medicine 45 (2):305-307.
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  33. Lincoln E. Ford (2000). Guns, Germs, and Steel: The Fates of Human Societies (Review). Perspectives in Biology and Medicine 43 (4):616-619.
  34.  7
    Paul J. Ford & Denise M. Dudzinski (eds.) (2008). Complex Ethics Consultations: Cases That Haunt Us. Cambridge University Press.
    Clinical ethicists encounter the most emotionally eviscerating medical cases possible. They struggle to facilitate resolutions founded on good reasoning embedded in compassionate care. This book fills the considerable gap between current texts and the continuing educational needs of those actually facing complex ethics consultations in hospital settings. 28 richly detailed cases explore the ethical reasoning, professional issues, and the emotional aspects of these impossibly difficult consultations. The cases are grouped together by theme to aid teaching, discussion and professional growth. The (...)
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  35.  70
    Anton Ford (2013). Is Agency a Power of Self-Movement? Inquiry 56 (6):597-610.
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  36. Sharon R. Ford (2011). Deriving the Manifestly Qualitative World From a Pure-Power Base: Light-Like Networks. Philosophia Scientiae 15 (3):155-175.
    Seeking to derive the manifestly qualitative world of objects and entities without recourse to fundamental categoricity or qualitativity, I offer an account of how higher-order categorical properties and objects may emerge from a pure-power base. I explore the possibility of ‘fields’ whose fluctuations are force-carrying entities, differentiated with respect to a micro-topology of curled-up spatial dimensions. Since the spacetime paths of gauge bosons have zero ‘spacetime interval’ and no time-like extension, I argue that according them the status of fundamental entities (...)
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  37.  62
    Juliet B. Schor & Margaret Ford (2007). From Tastes Great to Cool: Children's Food Marketing and the Rise of the Symbolic. Journal of Law, Medicine & Ethics 35 (1):10-21.
    Children's exposure to food marketing has exploded in recent years, along with rates of obesity and overweight. Children of color and low-income children are disproportionately at risk for both marketing exposure and becoming overweight.Comprehensive reviews of the literature show that advertising is effective in changing children's food preferences and diets.This paper surveys the scope and scale of current marketing practices, and focuses on the growing use of symbolic appeals that are central in food brands to themes such as finding an (...)
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  38.  6
    P. J. Ford (2006). Stimulating Debate: Ethics in a Multidisciplinary Functional Neurosurgery Committee. Journal of Medical Ethics 32 (2):106-109.
    Multidisciplinary healthcare committees meet regularly to discuss patients’ candidacy for emerging functional neurosurgical procedures, such as Deep Brain Stimulation . Through debate and discussion around the surgical candidacy of particular patients, functional neurosurgery programs begin to mold practice and policy supported both by scientific evidence and clear value choices. These neurosurgical decisions have special considerations not found in non-neurologic committees. The professional time used to resolve these conflicts provides opportunities for the emergence of careful, ethical practices simultaneous with the expansion (...)
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  39.  11
    Paul J. Ford (2007). Neurosurgical Implants: Clinical Protocol Considerations. Cambridge Quarterly of Healthcare Ethics 16 (3):308-311.
    As neural implants transition from engineering design and testing into human subjects research, careful consideration must be paid to the ethical elements in developing research protocols. Although these ethical aspects may be framed by the design choices of the engineering, a number of challenging choices arise. In spite of many ethical considerations for neural implant technologies being shared with generic research ethics questions, there are subsets needing special attention. Even in considerations requiring increased attention, substantial overlap can be found with (...)
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  40.  65
    Lewis S. Ford (1976). Prime Matter, Barrington Jones, and William Brenner. New Scholasticism 50 (2):229-231.
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  41. Lewis S. Ford (1970). On Some Difficulties with Whitehead's Definition of Abstractive Hierarchies. Philosophy and Phenomenological Research 30 (3):453-454.
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  42. Lewis S. Ford (1974). The Duration of the Present. Philosophy and Phenomenological Research 35 (1):100-106.
  43.  18
    Joseph P. Demarco & Paul J. Ford (2006). Balancing in Ethical Deliberation: Superior to Specification and Casuistry. Journal of Medicine and Philosophy 31 (5):483 – 497.
    Approaches to clinical ethics dilemmas that rely on basic principles or rules are difficult to apply because of vagueness and conflict among basic values. In response, casuistry rejects the use of basic values, and specification produces a large set of specified rules that are presumably easily applicable. Balancing is a method employed to weigh the relative importance of different and conflicting values in application. We argue against casuistry and specification, claiming that balancing is superior partly because it most clearly exhibits (...)
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  44.  24
    Lewis S. Ford (1977). Logos. Process Studies 7 (1):56-59.
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  45.  27
    Charlie Ford (1988). Book Reviews. [REVIEW] British Journal of Aesthetics 28 (4):185-187.
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  46.  26
    Lewis S. Ford (1978). Bonaventure and the Coincidence of Opposites. Process Studies 8 (3):201-202.
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  47.  21
    Lewis S. Ford (1986). The Openness of God. Process Studies 15 (2):143-143.
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  48.  4
    Jia Fei Jin, Michael T. Ford & Chih Chieh Chen (2013). Asymmetric Differences in Work–Family Spillover in North America and China: Results From Two Heterogeneous Samples. [REVIEW] Journal of Business Ethics 113 (1):1-14.
    Models of the work-to-family and family-to-work interface were tested in two heterogeneous samples of workers, one from North America (N = 408) and one from China (N = 442), using the same measures translated from English to Chinese using back translation. Consistent with proposed differences in the centrality of work and family, tolerance of work demands, and the availability of family support, work-to-family spillover effects tended to be stronger in the North American sample, whereas family-to-work spillover effects tended to be (...)
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  49.  20
    Lewis S. Ford (1971). New Shapes of Reality. Process Studies 1 (2):152-153.
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  50.  43
    Jason Ford (2011). Helen Keller Was Never in a Chinese Room. Minds and Machines 21 (1):57-72.
    William Rapaport, in “How Helen Keller used syntactic semantics to escape from a Chinese Room,” (Rapaport 2006), argues that Helen Keller was in a sort of Chinese Room, and that her subsequent development of natural language fluency illustrates the flaws in Searle’s famous Chinese Room Argument and provides a method for developing computers that have genuine semantics (and intentionality). I contend that his argument fails. In setting the problem, Rapaport uses his own preferred definitions of semantics and syntax, but he (...)
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