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Michelle Greenwood [17]Michelle R. Greenwood [2]
  1. Harry J. Buren & Michelle Greenwood (2013). The Genesis of Employment Ethics. Journal of Business Ethics 117 (4):707-719.
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  2. Michelle Greenwood (2013). Ethical Analyses of HRM: A Review and Research Agenda. [REVIEW] Journal of Business Ethics 114 (2):355-366.
    The very idea of human resource management raises ethical considerations: What does it mean to us as humans for human beings to be managed as resources? Intriguingly, the field of ethics and HRM remains underdeveloped. Current approaches to HRM fail to place ethical considerations as their central warrant. This article, building on Greenwood (J Bus Ethics 36(3):261–279, 2002), argues for a deeper analysis of ethical issues in HRM, indeed for a differentiated ethical perspective of HRM that sets normative deliberations as (...)
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  3. Harry J. van Buren Iii & Michelle Greenwood (2013). Ethics and HRM Education. Journal of Academic Ethics 11 (1):1-15.
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  4. Harry J. Van Buren & Michelle Greenwood (2013). Ethics and HRM Education. Journal of Academic Ethics 11 (1):1-15.
    Human resource management (HRM) education has tended to focus on specific functions and tasks within organizations, such as compensation, staffing, and evaluation. This task orientation within HRM education fails to account for the bigger questions facing human resource management and employment relationships, questions which address the roles and responsibilities of the HR function and HR practitioners. An educational focus on HRM that does not explicitly address larger ethical questions fails to equip students to address stakeholder concerns about how employees are (...)
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  5. Gavin Jack, Michelle Greenwood & Jan Schapper (2012). Frontiers, Intersections and Engagements of Ethics and HRM. Journal of Business Ethics 111 (1):1-12.
    This essay, and the special issue it introduces, sets out to reignite ethical interrogations of the theory and practice of Human Resource Management (HRM). To cultivate greater levels of boundary-spanning debate about the ethics of HRM, we develop a framework of four tenors for scholarly work: the ethical-declarative, the ethical-subjunctive, the ethical-ethnographic, the ethical-systemic. Each of these tenors denotes particular grounds for ethical critique and encourages scholars to consider the subjects and objects of their enquiry, the disciplinary scope of their (...)
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  6. Michelle Greenwood & R. Edward Freeman (2011). Ethics and HRM. Business and Professional Ethics Journal 30 (3-4):269-292.
    The development of an ethical perspective of HRM that is both employee centered and explicitly normative and, as such, distinct from dominant and criticalperspectives of HRM has progressed in recent years. Reliance on the traditional “threesome” of rights/justice theories, deontology and consequentialism, however, has limited debate to micro-level issues and the search for a “solution.” By understanding the employment relationship as a stakeholder relationship, we open the ethical analysis of HRM to the pluralism and pragmatism that stakeholder theory has to (...)
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  7. Michelle Greenwood & I. I. I. Buren (2010). Trust and Stakeholder Theory: Trustworthiness in the Organisation–Stakeholder Relationship. [REVIEW] Journal of Business Ethics 95 (3):425-438.
    Trust is a fundamental aspect of the moral treatment of stakeholders within the organization–stakeholder relationship. Stakeholders trust the organization to return benefit or protections from harm commensurate with their contributions or stakes. However, in many situations, the firm holds greater power than the stakeholder and therefore cannot necessarily be trusted to return the aforementioned duty to the stakeholder. Stakeholders must therefore rely on the trustworthiness of the organization to fulfill obligations in accordance to Phillips’ principle of fairness (Business Ethics Quarterly (...)
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  8. Harry J. van Buren Iii & Michelle Greenwood (2009). Stakeholder Voice. Philosophy of Management 8 (3):15-23.
    The 25th anniversary of R. Edward Freeman’s Strategic Management: A Stakeholder Approach provides an opportunity to consider where stakeholder theory has been, where it is going, and how it might influence the behavior of academics conducting stakeholder-oriented research. We propose that Freeman’s early work on the stakeholder concept supports the normative claim that a stakeholder’s contribution to value creation implies a right to stakeholder voice with regard to how a corporation makes decisions. Failure to account for stakeholder voice (especially for (...)
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  9. Harry J. Van Buren Iii & Michelle Greenwood (2008). Enhancing Employee Voice: Are Voluntary Employer–Employee Partnerships Enough? [REVIEW] Journal of Business Ethics 81 (1):209-221.
    One of the essential ethical issues in the employment relationship is the loss of employee voice. Many of the ways employees have previously exercised voice in the employment relationship have been rendered less effective by (1) the changing nature of work, (2) employer preferences for flexibility that often work to the disadvantage of employees, and (3) changes in public policy and institutional systems that have failed to protect workers. We will begin with a discussion of how work has changed in (...)
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  10. Harry J. Van Buren & Michelle Greenwood (2008). Enhancing Employee Voice: Are Voluntary Employer–Employee Partnerships Enough? Journal of Business Ethics 81 (1).
    One of the essential ethical issues in the employment relationship is the loss of employee voice. Many of the ways employees have previously exercised voice in the employment relationship have been rendered less effective by (1) the changing nature of work, (2) employer preferences for flexibility that often work to the disadvantage of employees, and (3) changes in public policy and institutional systems that have failed to protect workers. We will begin with a discussion of how work has changed in (...)
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  11. Michelle Greenwood (2007). Stakeholder Engagement: Beyond the Myth of Corporate Responsibility. [REVIEW] Journal of Business Ethics 74 (4):315 - 327.
    The purpose of this article is to transcend the assumption that stakeholder engagement is necessarily a responsible practice. Stakeholder engagement is traditionally seen as corporate responsibility in action. Indeed, in some literatures there exists an assumption that the more an organisation engages with its stakeholders, the more it is responsible. This simple 'more is better' view of stakeholder engagement belies the true complexity of the relationship between engagement and corporate responsibility. Stakeholder engagement may be understood in a variety of different (...)
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  12. Michelle Greenwood & Helen De Cieri (2007). Stakeholder Theory and the Ethics of HRM. In Ashly Pinnington, Rob Macklin & Tom Campbell (eds.), Human Resource Management: Ethics and Employment. Oup Oxford.
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  13. Michelle R. Greenwood & John Simmons (2004). A Stakeholder Approach to Ethical Human Resource Management. Business and Professional Ethics Journal 23 (3):3-23.
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  14. Michelle R. Greenwood (2002). Ethics and HRM: A Review and Conceptual Analysis. [REVIEW] Journal of Business Ethics 36 (3):261 - 278.
    This paper reviews and develops the ethical analysis of human resource management (HRM). Initially, the ethical perspective of HRM is differentiated from the "mainstrea" and critical perspectives of HRM. To date, the ethical analysis of HRM has taken one of two forms: the application Kantian and utilitarian ethical theories to the gestalt of HRM, and the application of theories of justice and fairness to specific HRM practices. This paper is concerned with the former, the ethical analysis of HRM in its (...)
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  15. Michelle Greenwood (2001). The Importance of Stakeholders According to Business Leaders. Business and Society Review 106 (1):29-49.
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  16. Michelle Greenwood (2000). The Study of Business Ethics: A Case for Dr Seuss. Business Ethics 9 (3):155–162.
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