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Profile: Michelle Kosch (Cornell University)
  1. Michelle Kosch (forthcoming). Fichtean Kantianism in Nineteenth Century Ethics. Journal of the History of Philosophy.
  2. Michelle Kosch (forthcoming). Idealism and Freedom in Schelling's Freiheitsschrift. In Lara Ostaric (ed.), Interpreting Schelling: Critical Essays. Cambridge University Press.
    The 1809 essay Philosophical Investigations into the Essence of Human Freedom and Related Matters marked a turning point in Schelling’s thinking about freedom. In various early works he had endorsed a compatibilist account of free will, arguing that acts could be free in the sense required for morally responsible agency, while still being necessary from a causal and even a metaphysical point of view. In later work he would endorse an incompatiblist conception of freedom as involving radical choice between good (...)
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  3. Michelle Kosch (forthcoming). Kierkegaard. In Michael Forster Kristin Gjesdal (ed.), The Oxford Handbook of 19th century Philosophy. Oxford University Press.
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  4. Michelle Kosch (forthcoming). Practical Deliberationand the Voice of Conscience in Fichte's 1798 System of Ethics. Philosophers' Imprint.
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  5. Michelle Kosch (forthcoming). The Ethical Context of Either/Or. Konturen.
    In an earlier paper I argued that J.G. Fichte (rather than Kant or Hegel or some amalgam) was the primary historical model for the ethical standpoint described in Kierkegaard’s Either/Or II . There I offered a list of reasons for thinking that Hegel was less important than some believed and that Kierkegaard addressed Kantianism largely in its Fichtean form. In the interim I have discovered another reason to add to that list: as it happens, there was a quite general consensus (...)
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  6. Michelle Kosch (2014). Agency and Self‐Sufficiency in Fichte's Ethics. Philosophy and Phenomenological Research 88 (2).
  7. Michelle Kosch (2012). Introduction. Philosophical Forum 43 (3):243-246.
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  8. Michelle Kosch (2011). Formal Freedom in Fichte's System of Ethics. International Yearbook of German Idealism 9:150-168.
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  9. Michelle Kosch (2010). Gasché on Scheler. Philosophical Forum 41 (1):127-130.
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  10. Michelle Kosch (2008). Horstmann on Cohen. Philosophical Forum 39 (2):139-142.
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  11. Michelle Kosch (2008). What Abraham Couldn't Say. Aristotelian Society Supplementary Volume 82 (1):59-78.
    The explicit topic of Fear and Trembling's third Problema (the longest single section, accounting for a third of the book's total length), the theme of Abraham's silence stands not far in the background in every other section, and its importance is flagged by the pseudonym—Johannes de silentio—under which Kierkegaard had the book published. Here I aim to defend an interpretation of the meaning of the third Problema's central claim—that Abraham cannot explain himself, 'cannot speak'—and to argue on its basis for (...)
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  12. Michelle Kosch (2006). €˜Despair’ in Kierkegaard’s Either / Or. Journal of the History of Philosophy 44 (1):85--97.
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  13. Michelle Kosch (2006). Freedom and Reason in Kant, Schelling, and Kierkegaard. Oxford University Press.
    Michelle Kosch examines the conceptions of free will and the foundations of ethics in the work of Kant, Schelling, and Kierkegaard. She seeks to understand the history of German idealism better by looking at it through the lens of these issues, and to understand Kierkegaard better by placing his thought in this context. Kosch argues for a new interpretation of Kierkegaard's theory of agency, that Schelling was a major influence and Kant a major target of criticism, and that both the (...)
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  14. Michelle Kosch (2006). Kierkegaard's Ethicist: Fichte's Role in Kierkegaard's Construction of the Ethical Standpoint. Archiv für Geschichte der Philosophie 88 (3):261-295.
    I argue that Fichte (rather than Kant or Hegel or some amalgam of the two) was the primary historical model for the ethical standpoint described in Kierkegaard's Either/Or II. I then explain how looking at Kierkegaard's texts with Fichte in mind helps in interpreting the criticism of the ethical standpoint in works like The Sickness unto Death and Concluding Unscientific Postscript, as well as the significance of the discussion of secular ethics in Fear and Trembling. I conclude with a brief (...)
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  15. Michelle Kosch (2006). 'Despair' in Kierkegaard's Either/Or. Journal of the History of Philosophy 44 (1):85-97.
    : The category of despair plays a central role in Kierkegaard's pseudonymous corpus, but its meaning is controversial. This paper offers an interpretation of its use in Either/Or (in particular, in the claim the aesthetic life is despair and the ethical life freedom from despair). After examining and rejecting two recent alternatives, I argue that despair is the conscious or unconscious assumption of a passive or fatalistic attitude toward one's existence, which attitude is informed by a misconstrual of the nature (...)
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  16. Michelle Kosch (2002). 'Actuality' in Schelling and Kierkegaard. In Jon Stewart & NJ Cappelorn (eds.), Kierkegaard Studies Yearbook. De Gruyter.
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  17. Michelle Kosch (2000). Freedom and Immanence. In James Giles (ed.), Kierkegaard and Freedom. Macmillan/St. Martins.
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