Search results for 'Mick Power' (try it on Scholar)

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  1. Mick Power (2000). Freud and the Unconscious. The Psychologist. Special Issue 13 (12):612-614.score: 240.0
  2. Mick Power (2013). Well-Being, Quality of Life, and the Naïve Pursuit of Happiness. Topoi 32 (2):145-152.score: 240.0
    The pursuit of happiness is a long-enshrined tradition that has recently become the cornerstone of the American Positive Psychology movement. However, “happiness” is an over-worked and ambiguous word, which, it is argued, should be restricted and only used as the label for a brief emotional state that typically lasts a few seconds or minutes. The corollary proposal for positive psychology is that optimism is a preferable stance over pessimism or realism. Examples are presented both from psychology and economics that illustrate (...)
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  3. Tim Dalgleish & Mick J. Power (1999). Cognition and Emotion: Future Directions. In Tim Dalgleish & M. J. Powers (eds.), Handbook of Cognition and Emotion. Wiley. 799--805.score: 240.0
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  4. Truth Or Power (2003). He Main Thesis for Which I Intend to Argue is That There is an Exclusi-T Ve Disjunction Between Two Options for the Foundations of Morality: There is Truth or There is the Exercise of Power. 1 In Other Words, the Deni. In P. Schaber & R. Huntelmann (eds.), Grundlagen der Ethik. 123.score: 120.0
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  5. Babette Babich (2007). Heidegger’s Will to Power. Journal of the British Society for Phenomenology 38 (1):37-60.score: 18.0
    On Heidegger's Beitraege and the influence of Nietzsche's Will to Power (a famous non-book).
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  6. Petri Ylikoski & Jaakko Kuorikoski (2010). Dissecting Explanatory Power. Philosophical Studies 148 (2):201–219.score: 18.0
    Comparisons of rival explanations or theories often involve vague appeals to explanatory power. In this paper, we dissect this metaphor by distinguishing between different dimensions of the goodness of an explanation: non-sensitivity, cognitive salience, precision, factual accuracy and degree of integration. These dimensions are partially independent and often come into conflict. Our main contribution is to go beyond simple stipulation or description by explicating why these factors are taken to be explanatory virtues. We accomplish this by using the contrastive-counterfactual (...)
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  7. Martin Saar (2008). Understanding Genealogy: History, Power, and the Self. Journal of the Philosophy of History 2 (3):295-314.score: 18.0
    The aim of this article is to clarify the relation between genealogy and history and to suggest a methodological reading of Nietzsche's Genealogy of Morals. I try to determine genealogy's specific range of objects, specific mode of explication, and specific textual form. Genealogies in general can be thought of as drastic narratives of the emergence and transformations of forms of subjectivity related to power, told with the intention to induce doubt and self-reflection in exactly those readers whose (collective) history (...)
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  8. Donovan Miyasaki (2013). Nietzsche's Will to Power as Naturalist Critical Ontology. History of Philosophy Quarterly 30 (3):251-69.score: 18.0
    In this paper, I argue that Nietzsche’s published works contain a substantial, although implicit, argument for the will to power as ontology—a critical and descriptive, rather than positive and explanatory, theory of reality. Further, I suggest this ontology is entirely consistent with a naturalist methodology. The will to power ontology follows directly from Nietzsche’s naturalist rejection of three metaphysical presuppositions: substance, efficient causality, and final causality. I show that a number of interpretations, including those of Clark, Schacht, Reginster, (...)
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  9. Pablo Gilabert (forthcoming). Reflections on Human Rights and Power. In Adam Etinson (ed.), Human Rights: Moral or Political? Oxford University Press.score: 18.0
    Human rights are particularly relevant in contexts in which there are significant asymmetries of power, but where these asymmetries exist the human rights project turns out to be especially difficult to realize. The stronger can use their disproportionate power both to threaten others’ human rights and to frustrate attempts to secure their fulfillment. They may even monopolize the international discussion as to what human rights are and how they should be implemented. This paper explores this tension between the (...)
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  10. Benda Hofmeyr (2006). The Power Not to Be (What We Are): The Politics and Ethics of Self-Creation in Foucault. Journal of Moral Philosophy 3 (2):215-230.score: 18.0
    on ethics provides an opportunity to go beyond some of the controversies generated by his work of the 1970s. It was thought, for example, that Foucault had overstated the extent to which individuals could be ‘subjected’ to the influence of power, leaving them little room to resist. This paper will consider the ‘politics’ of self-creation. We shall attempt to establish to what extent Foucault’s later notion of self-formation does in fact succeed in countering an over determination by power. (...)
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  11. Sheila Jasanoff & Sang-Hyun Kim (2009). Containing the Atom: Sociotechnical Imaginaries and Nuclear Power in the United States and South Korea. Minerva 47 (2):119-146.score: 18.0
    STS research has devoted relatively little attention to the promotion and reception of science and technology by non-scientific actors and institutions. One consequence is that the relationship of science and technology to political power has tended to remain undertheorized. This article aims to fill that gap by introducing the concept of sociotechnical imaginaries. Through a comparative examination of the development and regulation of nuclear power in the US and South Korea, the article demonstrates the analytic potential of the (...)
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  12. Ericka Tucker (2013). Spinoza’s Hobbesian Naturalism and Its Promise for a Feminist Theory of Power. Revista Conatus - Filosofia de Spinoza 7 (13):11-23.score: 18.0
    This paper examines recent feminist work on Spinoza and identifies the elements of Spinoza’s philosophy that have been seen as promising for feminist naturalism. I argue that the elements of Spinoza’s work that feminist theorists have found so promising are precisely those concepts he derives from Hobbes. I argue that the misunderstanding of Hobbes as architect of the egoist model of human nature has effaced his contribution to Spinoza’s more praised conception of the human individual. Despite misconceptions, I argue that (...)
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  13. Henry Laycock (1999). Exploitation Via Labour Power in Marx. Journal of Ethics 3 (2):121--131.score: 18.0
    Marx''s account of capitalist exploitation is undermined by inter-related confusions surrounding the notion of labour power. These confusions relate to [i] what labour power is, [ii] what happens to labour power in the labour market, and [iii] what the epistemic status of labour power is (the issue of appearance and reality). The central theses of the paper are [a] that property ownership is the wrong model for understanding the exploitation of labour, and [b] that the concept (...)
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  14. Pablo Gilabert (forthcoming). Human Rights, Human Dignity, and Power. In Rowan Cruft, Matthew Liao & Massimo Renzo (eds.), The Philosophical Foundations of Human Rights. Oxford University Press.score: 18.0
    This paper explores the connections between human rights, human dignity, and power. The idea of human dignity is omnipresent in human rights discourse, but its meaning and point is not always clear. It is standardly used in two ways, to refer to (a) a normative status of persons that makes their treatment in terms of human rights a proper response, and (b) a social condition of persons in which their human rights are fulfilled. This paper pursues three tasks. First, (...)
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  15. Donovan Miyasaki (forthcoming). (2014) The Equivocal Use of Power in Nietzsche's Failed Anti-Egalitarianism. Journal of Moral Philosophy:1-32.score: 18.0
    Nietzsche’s rejection of egalitarianism depends on equivocation between distinct conceptions of power and equality. When these distinct views are disentangled, Nietzsche’s arguments succeed only against a narrow sense of equality as qualitative similarity, and not against quantitative forms that promote equality not as similarity but as multiple, proportional resistances. For the promotion of an individual’s qualitative power is compatible with quantitative power equality. Moreover, because power is felt only in resistance, the feeling of power requires (...)
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  16. Jiafeng Zhu (2012). Legitimacy as a Mere Moral Power? A Response to Applbaum. Diametros 33 (33):120-137.score: 18.0
    In a recent article, Arthur Applbaum contributes a new view—legitimacy as a moral power—to the debate over the concept of political legitimacy. Applbaum rejects competing views of legitimacy, in particular legitimacy as a claim-right to have the law obeyed, for mistakenly invoking substantive moral argument in the conceptual analysis, and concludes that “at the core of the concept—what legitimacy is” is only a Hohfeldian moral power. In this article, I contend that: (1) Applbaum’s view of legitimacy, when fully (...)
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  17. Jan Tullberg (2004). Illusions of Corporate Power:Revisiting the Relative Powers of Corporations and Governments. [REVIEW] Journal of Business Ethics 52 (4):325 - 333.score: 18.0
    A common opinion is that power has shifted from states to companies. This article discusses quantitative and qualitative aspects of power possessed by companies and by states. A more adequate comparison than that between company sales and gross national product is the one between company value added and GNP. Also more adequate is the comparison between the public sector and company net profit. These rival measures take down company power to about a tenth of the sales measure. (...)
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  18. Stefan Wintein (2012). Assertoric Semantics and the Computational Power of Self-Referential Truth. Journal of Philosophical Logic 41 (2):317-345.score: 18.0
    There is no consensus as to whether a Liar sentence is meaningful or not. Still, a widespread conviction with respect to Liar sentences (and other ungrounded sentences) is that, whether or not they are meaningful, they are useless . The philosophical contribution of this paper is to put this conviction into question. Using the framework of assertoric semantics , which is a semantic valuation method for languages of self-referential truth that has been developed by the author, we show that certain (...)
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  19. Peter Morriss (2002). Power: A Philosophical Analysis. Manchester University Press.score: 18.0
    Peter Morriss discusses the notion of 'power' and attempts to show how recent accounts of power have misinterpreted crucial components, thereby producing faulty analyses. He puts the study of power into a modern context and also explains why an understanding of power is so important in developing a radical critique of a society. The revised second edition includes a new foreword.
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  20. Xiangdong Xu (2011). Thomas Reid on Active Power and Free Agency. Frontiers of Philosophy in China 6 (3):369-389.score: 18.0
    The paper argues that it is a mistake to interpret Thomas Reid as holding a libertarian notion of freedom, and to make use of Reid to argue in support of a libertarian position. More precisely, this paper shows that Reid’s theory of agent-causation may not be what these philosophers take it to be, once such crucial notions as agent-causation and active power in Reid’s theory of free agency have been fully explicated. Reid is more committed to accepting the view (...)
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  21. Judith Butler (1997). The Psychic Life of Power: Theories in Subjection. Stanford University Press.score: 18.0
    The author considers the way in which psychic life is generated by the social operation of power, and how that social operation of power is concealed and fortified by the psyche that it produces. Power is no longer understood to be 'internalized' by an existing subject, but the subject is spawned as an ambivalent effect of power, one that is staged through the operation of conscience. To claim that power fabricates the psyche is also to (...)
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  22. Moya Lloyd (2005). Beyond Identity Politics: Feminism, Power & Politics. Sage.score: 18.0
    Recent debates in contemporary feminist theory have been dominated by the relation between identity and politics. Beyond Identity Politics examines the implications of recent theorizing on difference, identity and subjectivity for theories of patriarchy and feminist politics. Organised around the three central themes of subjectivity, power and politics, this book focuses on a question which feminists struggled with and were divided by throughout the last decade, that is: how to theorize the relation between the subject and politics. In this (...)
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  23. Christine James (2010). The Common Vernacular of Power Relations in Heavy Metal and Christian Fundamentalist Performances. In Rosemary Hill Karl Spracklen (ed.), Heavy Fundametalisms: Music, Metal and Politics. Inter-Disciplinary Press.score: 18.0
    Wittgenstein’s comment that what can be shown cannot be said has a special resonance with visual representations of power in both Heavy Metal and Fundamentalist Christian communities. Performances at metal shows, and performances of ‘religious theatre’, share an emphasis on violence and destruction. For example, groups like GWAR and Cannibal Corpse feature violent scenes in stage shows and album covers, scenes that depict gory results of unrestrained sexuality that are strikingly like Halloween ‘Hell House’ show presented by neo-Conservative, Fundamentalist (...)
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  24. Amy Allen (1999). The Power of Feminist Theory: Domination, Resistance, Solidarity. Westview Press.score: 18.0
    Power is clearly a crucial concept for feminist theory. Insofar as feminists are interested in analyzing power, it is because they have an interest in understanding, critiquing, and ultimately challenging the multiple array of unjust power relations affecting women in contemporary Western societies, including sexism, racism, heterosexism, and class oppression.In The Power of Feminist Theory, Amy Allen diagnoses the inadequacies of previous feminist conceptions of power, and draws on the work of a diverse group of (...)
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  25. Estelle Ferrarese (2009). &Quot;gabba-Gabba, We Accept You, One of Us&Quot;: Vulnerability and Power in the Relationship of Recognition. Constellations 16 (4):604-614.score: 18.0
    No Current Hegelian theories of recognition assume a concept of the subject as always being available for harming. This emphasis placed on vulnerability, whose validity is not being called into question as such here, leave a certain number of elements on the nature of the harm threatening the person expecting recognition unclarified, especially the fact that it cannot be perpetrated without the victim being aware. At the same time, it fails to address the nature of the relationship of recognition, omitting (...)
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  26. Christopher Mayes (2009). Pastoral Power and the Confessing Subject in Patient-Centred Communication. Journal of Bioethical Inquiry 6 (4):483-493.score: 18.0
    This paper examines the power relations in “patient-centred communication”. Drawing on the work of Michel Foucault I argue that while patient-centred communication frees the patient from particular aspects of medical power, it also introduces the patient to new power relations. The paper uses a Foucauldian analysis of power to argue that patient-centred communication introduces a new dynamic of power relations to the medical encounter, entangling and producing the patient to participate in the medical encounter in (...)
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  27. K. Britz (1999). A Power Algebra for Theory Change. Journal of Logic, Language and Information 8 (4):429-443.score: 18.0
    Various representation results have been established for logics of belief revision, in terms of remainder sets, epistemic entrenchment, systems of spheres and so on. In this paper I present another representation for logics of belief revision, as an algebra of theories. I show that an algebra of theories, enriched with a set of rejection operations, provides a suitable algebraic framework to characterize the theory change operations of systems of belief revision. The theory change operations arise as power operations of (...)
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  28. Mahmoud Khatami (2007). On the Illuminationist Approach to Imaginal Power: Outline of a Perspective. Topoi 26 (2):221-229.score: 18.0
    Imagination has always been a mysterious issue for modern philosophy and psychology. In this paper, however, I will not deal with modern theories of imagination; instead, I will suggest an alternative notion of imaginal power by stepping back toward Persian illuminative thought within which we may glimpse a hint of a transcendent concept of imagination as the source of human subjectivity and its power to create the object and the world. My objective here is to extend some noetic (...)
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  29. Cal Ledsham (2010). Love, Power and Consistency: Scotus' Doctrines of God's Power, Contingent Creation, Induction and Natural Law. Sophia 49 (4):557-575.score: 18.0
    I first examine John Duns Scotus’ view of contingency, pure possibility, and created possibilities, and his version of the celebrated distinction between ordained and absolute power. Scotus’ views on ethical natural law and his account of induction are characterised, and their dependence on the preceding doctrines detailed. I argue that there is an inconsistency in his treatments of the problem of induction and ethical natural law. Both proceed with God’s contingently willed creation of a given order of laws, which (...)
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  30. Sarit Nisim & Orly Benjamin (2008). Power and Size of Firms as Reflected in Cleaning Subcontractors' Practices of Social Responsibility. Journal of Business Ethics 83 (4):673 - 683.score: 18.0
    Recent discussions in the area of corporate social responsibility suggest that organizational size has complex meanings and thus requires more scholarly attention. This article explores organizational size in the context of relative power in inter-organizational networks. To shed light on the ways relative power interacts with size we studied social responsibility practices among cleaning subcontractors in three firms of different sizes. Our focus on the network differentiates these firms on the basis of their size and sector. Semi-structured interviews (...)
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  31. Aileen Smith & Evelyn C. Hume (2005). Linking Culture and Ethics: A Comparison of Accountants' Ethical Belief Systems in the Individualism/Collectivism and Power Distance Contexts. [REVIEW] Journal of Business Ethics 62 (3):209 - 220.score: 18.0
    This study uses accounting professionals from an international setting to test the individualism and power distance cultural dimensions developed by Hofstede [Culture’s Consequences (Sage Publications, Beverly Hills, CA) 1980]. Six countries, which appropriately represented high and low values on the Hofstede dimensions, were chosen for the survey of ethical beliefs. Respondents (n = 249) from the six countries were requested to supply their agreement/disagreement with eight questionable behaviors associated with the work environment. Each of these behaviors contained an individualism (...)
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  32. Jukka Varelius (2009). Collective Informed Consent and Decision Power. Science and Engineering Ethics 15 (1):39-50.score: 18.0
    It has been suggested that, in addition to individual level decision-making, informed consent procedures could be used in collective decision-making too. One of the main criticisms directed at this suggestion concerns decision-making power. It is maintained that consent is a veto power concept and that, as such, it is not appropriate for collective decision-making. This paper examines this objection to collective informed consent. It argues that veto power informed consent can have some uses in the collective level (...)
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  33. Thom Brooks (2012). After Fukushima Daiichi: New Global Institutions for Improved Nuclear Power Policy. Ethics, Policy and Environment 15 (1):63 - 69.score: 18.0
    This comment argues for the importance of global institutions to regulate nuclear power. Nuclear power presents challenges across national borders irrespective of whether plants are maintained safely. There are international agreements in place on the disposal of nuclear waste, an issue of great concern in terms of environmental and health effects for any nuclear power policy. However, there remains a pressing need for an international agreement to ensure the safe maintenance of nuclear facilities. Safe nuclear power (...)
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  34. Sandra Field (2014). Hobbes and the Question of Power. Journal of the History of Philosophy 52 (1):61-85.score: 18.0
    The Question of Power is Central to the study of politics. Thomas Hobbes has been hailed as the author of the greatest political philosophy written in the English language,1 and indeed as the philosopher of power par excellence.2 Nonetheless, i argue that conceptualizing political power is a problem for Hobbes. He starts with a commonsense view that understands the power of individuals as their natural faculties, and that then envisages these powers being compounded together by covenant (...)
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  35. Juhani Pietarinen & Valtteri Viljanen (eds.) (2009). The World as Active Power: Studies in the History of European Reason. Brill.score: 18.0
    This collection of essays discusses a central feature of European philosophy: the idea of a universal active power as the ultimate world-explanation.
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  36. James S. Bowman & Jonathan P. West (2007). Lord Acton and Employment Doctrines: Absolute Power and the Spread of at-Will Employment. [REVIEW] Journal of Business Ethics 74 (2):119 - 130.score: 18.0
    This study analyzes the at-will employment doctrine using a tool that encompasses the complementarity of results-based utilitarian ethics, rule-based duty ethics, and virtue-based character ethics. The paper begins with a discussion of the importance of the problem followed by its evolution and current status. After describing the method of analysis, the central section evaluates the employment at-will doctrine, and is informed by Lord Acton's dictum, "power tends to corrupt, and absolute power corrupts absolutely." The conclusion explores the implications (...)
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  37. Gilbert Burgh & Mor Yorshansky (2011). Communities of Inquiry: Politics, Power and Group Dynamics. Educational Philosophy and Theory 43 (5):436-452.score: 18.0
    The notion of a community of inquiry has been treated by many of its proponents as being an exemplar of democracy in action. We argue that the assumptions underlying this view present some practical and theoretical difficulties, particularly in relation to distribution of power among the members of a community of inquiry. We identify two presuppositions in relation to distribution of power that require attention in developing an educational model that is committed to deliberative democracy: (1) openness to (...)
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  38. Dennis J. Schmidt (2008). Who Counts? On Democracy, Power, and the Incalculable. Research in Phenomenology 38 (2):228-243.score: 18.0
    The intention of this paper is to discuss the notion and word "democracy" as a Greek legacy and then to pose the question of the specific challenges to that conception of democracy presented by this historical present, which Heidegger characterizes as the Gestell. Questions concerning the sources of power, the relation of power to peoples and individuals, as well as the shift from power to violence are addressed. Plato, Aristotle, Pericles, Lincoln, Derrida, and Heidegger are the key (...)
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  39. Krista Bondy (2008). The Paradox of Power in CSR: A Case Study on Implementation. [REVIEW] Journal of Business Ethics 82 (2):307 - 323.score: 18.0
    Purpose Although current literature assumes positive outcomes for stakeholders resulting from an increase in power associated with CSR, this research suggests that this increase can lead to conflict within organizations, resulting in almost complete inactivity on CSR. Methods A Single in-depth case study, focusing on power as an embedded concept. Results Empirical evidence is used to demonstrate how some actors use CSR to improve their own positions within an organization. Resource dependence theory is used to highlight why this (...)
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  40. Gert Buelens (ed.) (1997). Enacting History in Henry James: Narrative, Power, and Ethics. Cambridge University Press.score: 18.0
    The Jamesian mode of writing, it has been claimed, actively works against an understanding of the way truth, history and power circulate in his texts. In this collection of essays, leading scholars of James analyse the strategies James used to address these crucial issues. Enacting History in Henry James claims that, because the type of knowledge available in James's fiction is never of a cognitive kind, the reader can never know 'truth' in any verifiable sense. James's writing instead promises (...)
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  41. Arne Nygaard & Harald Biong (2010). The Influence of Retail Management's Use of Social Power on Corporate Ethical Values, Employee Commitment, and Performance. [REVIEW] Journal of Business Ethics 97 (3):341 - 363.score: 18.0
    Recent cases in retailing reflect that ethics have a major impact on brands and performance, in turn, demonstrating that brand owners, employees, and consumers focus on ethical values. In this study, we analyze how various sources of social power affect corporate ethical values, retailer's commitment to the retail organization, and ultimately sales and service quality. Multisource data based on a sample of 225 retailers indicated a strong link between power, ethics, and commitment and that these affected output performance.
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  42. Kathy Davis, Monique Leijenaar & Jantine Oldersma (eds.) (1991). The Gender of Power. Sage Publications.score: 18.0
    "This book does serve a very useful purpose in returning power to the centre of the feminist stage. . . . This book makes clear the ways in which the machinations of power are more subtle, widespread, and multiform than it sometimes appears. Further, the clarity of presentation means that it is also a text that can usefully be included on student bibliographies." --Women's Philosophy Review "The Gender of Power, which announces itself in the first line of (...)
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  43. Jeremy Moss (2002). Power and the Digital Divide. Ethics and Information Technology 4 (2):159-165.score: 18.0
    The ethical and political dilemmas raised byInformation and Communication Technology (ICT)have only just begun to be understood. Theimpact of centralised data collection, masscommunication technologies or the centrality ofcomputer technology as a means of accessingimportant social institutions, all poseimportant ethical and political questions. As away of capturing some of these effects I willcharacterise them in terms of the type of powerand, more particularly, the Power-over peoplethat they exercise. My choice of thisparticular nomenclature is that it allows us todescribe, firstly, how (...)
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  44. Thomas Aastrup Rømer (2011). Postmodern Education and the Concept of Power. Educational Philosophy and Theory 43 (7):755-772.score: 18.0
    This article presents a discussion of how postmodernist, poststructuralist and critical educational thinking relate to different theories of power. I argue that both Critical Theory and some poststructuralist ideas base themselves on a concept of power borrowed from a modernist tradition. I argue as well that we are better off combining a postmodern idea of education with a postmodern idea of power. To this end the concept of power presented by the works of Ernesto Laclau and (...)
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  45. Valtteri Viljanen (2011). Spinoza's Geometry of Power. Cambridge University Press.score: 18.0
    This work examines the unique way in which Benedict de Spinoza (1632-77) combines two significant philosophical principles: that real existence requires causal power and that geometrical objects display exceptionally clearly how things have properties in virtue of their essences. Valtteri Viljanen argues that underlying Spinoza's psychology and ethics is a compelling metaphysical theory according to which each and every genuine thing is an entity of power endowed with an internal structure akin to that of geometrical objects. This allows (...)
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  46. Harald Biong, Arne Nygaard & Ragnhild Silkoset (2010). The Influence of Retail Management's Use of Social Power on Corporate Ethical Values, Employee Commitment, and Performance. [REVIEW] Journal of Business Ethics 97 (3):341 - 363.score: 18.0
    Recent cases in retailing reflect that ethics have a major impact on brands and performance, in turn, demonstrating that brand owners, employees, and consumers focus on ethical values. In this study, we analyze how various sources of social power affect corporate ethical values, retailer's commitment to the retail organization, and ultimately sales and service quality. Multisource data based on a sample of 225 retailers indicated a strong link between power, ethics, and commitment and that these affected output performance.
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  47. Miriam T. Griffin, Gillian Clark & Tessa Rajak (eds.) (2002). Philosophy and Power in the Graeco-Roman World: Essays in Honour of Miriam Griffin. Oxford University Press.score: 18.0
    This volume in honor of Miriam Griffin brings together seventeen international specialists. Their essays range from Socrates to late antiquity, with a particular focus on Cicero. Subjects covered include the Stoics and Cynics, Roman law, the formulation of imperial power, Jews and Christians, "performance philosophy," Augustine, late Platonism, and women philosophers.
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  48. Galia Patt-Shamir (2012). Filial Piety, Vital Power, and a Moral Sense of Immortality in Zhang Zai's Philosophy. Dao: A Journal of Comparative Philosophy 11 (2):223-239.score: 18.0
    The present article focuses on Zhang Zai’s 張載 attitude toward death and its moral significance. It launches with the unusual link between the opening statement of the Western Inscription 西銘 regarding heaven and earth as parents and the conclusion that serving one’s cosmic parents during life, one is peaceful in death. Through the analogy of human relations with heaven and earth as filial piety (xiao 孝), Zhang Zai sets a framework for an understanding that being filial through life eliminates the (...)
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  49. Valerie Rosenblatt (2012). Hierarchies, Power Inequalities, and Organizational Corruption. Journal of Business Ethics 111 (2):237-251.score: 18.0
    This article uses social dominance theory (SDT) to explore the dynamic and systemic nature of the initiation and maintenance of organizational corruption. Rooted in the definition of organizational corruption as misuse of power or position for personal or organizational gain, this work suggests that organizational corruption is driven by the individual and institutional tendency to structure societies as group-based social hierarchies. SDT describes a series of factors and processes across multiple levels of analysis that systemically contribute to the initiation (...)
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  50. James Patrick Mackey (1994/2005). Power and Christian Ethics. Cambridge University Press.score: 18.0
    In the conventional analysis of human behaviour, power and ethics are frequently considered contrary principles, in that power enforces, while ethics elicits a free response. But, as James Mackey forcefully shows, a more adventurous philosophical study of human morality escapes the sense of contraries, and sets us on a quest for the kind of power that liberates human creativity. It then becomes possible to establish the framework for a critical assessment of the kind of power that (...)
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