Search results for 'Middle Way Philosophy' (try it on Scholar)

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  1. Guttorm Fløstad, Raymond Klibansky & International Institute of Philosophy (1990). Philosophy and Science in the Middle Ages.
     
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  2.  26
    Robert M. Ellis (2011). Truth on the Edge: A Brief Western Philosophy of the Middle Way. Lulu.Com.
    This book is a briefer and updated account of the Middle Way Philosophy developed in 'A Theory of Moral Objectivity'. Its starting point is the argument that we are not justified in making any claims about truth, whether moral or scientific, but the idea of truth is still meaningful. Instead of making or denying metaphysical claims about truth, we need to think in terms of incrementally objective justification within experience. This standpoint is related to an account of objectivity (...)
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  3. Robert M. Ellis (2013). Middle Way Philosophy 2: The Integration of Desire. Lulu.
    An argument that there is a common pattern in conflict between desires and the dialectical integration of those conflicts, at both individual and socio-political levels. Philosophical, psychological, poltical and Buddhist approaches to integration are brought together here to show how the integration of desire contributes to moral objectivity.
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  4.  39
    Robert M. Ellis (2012). Middle Way Philosophy 1: The Path of Objectivity. Lulu.
    The first of a series of 4 volumes on Middle Way Philosophy. Middle Way Philosophy was originally inspired by the Middle Way of the Buddha but is developed in an entirely Western context. It addresses the questions of objectivity, justification, facts and values, and the relationship of philosophy and psychology. It develops the concept of experiential adequacy to provide a non-metaphysical resolution of the dichotomy between absolutism and relativism in both facts and values.
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  5.  74
    Thupten Jinpa (2002). Self, Reality and Reason in Tibetan Philosophy: Tsongkhapa's Quest for the Middle Way. Routledgecurzon.
    The work explores the historical and intellectual context of Tsongkhapa's philosophy and addresses the critical issues related to questions of development and originality in Tsongkhapa's thought. It also deals extensively with one of Tsongkhapa's primary concerns, namely his attempts to demonstrate that the Middle Way philosophy's de-constructive analysis does not negate the reality of the everyday world. The study's central focus, however, is the question of the existence and the nature of self. This is explored both in (...)
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  6.  18
    Robert M. Ellis (2013). Middle Way Philosophy 3: The Integration of Meaning. Lulu.
    This third volume of the Middle Way Philosophy series applies the revolutionary view, taken from cognitive science, that meaning is found in our bodies rather than in a relationship between language and reality. Cognitive and emotive meaning cannot be separated. This approach reveals the basic error of the metaphysical views that depend on absolute cognitive meaning. It also provides the basis for an account of how we can integrate meaning. Each new time we connect an experience to a (...)
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  7.  13
    Robert M. Ellis (2015). Middle Way Philosophy 4: The Integration of Belief. Lulu.
    This fourth volume of the Middle Way Philosophy series uses cognitive psychology and balanced sceptical philosophy to explain both how we get stuck in dogmas, and how provisionality is possible. It is argued that we can make progress both in avoiding delusions and developing wisdom not by finding ‘truth’ or employing ‘rationality’, but rather through awareness of our assumptions. We need not ultimately true beliefs (as is often assumed), but judgements that are more adequate to each new (...)
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  8.  66
    Ewing Y. Chinn (2006). John Dewey and the Buddhist Philosophy of the Middle Way. Asian Philosophy 16 (2):87 – 98.
    This paper argues that the central philosophical movement in the complex history of Buddhism that originated with Siddhartha Gautama, the Buddha and carried on by Nāgārjuna (among other later Buddhist philosophers) shares some common themes with the pragmatic philosophy of John Dewey. These themes are the rejection of traditional metaphysics as definitive of philosophy, a return to the correct understanding of the nature of experience, and a particular view about the conduct and nature of philosophy. Dewey is (...)
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  9.  1
    Charles Hartshorne (1987). Wisdom as Moderation: A Philosophy of the Middle Way. State University of New York Press.
    This work brings to a new focus the unity of Hartshorne's thought as a whole, showing the relationship between good philosophical sense and good common sense.
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  10.  1
    Kenneth Liberman (forthcoming). The Status of Analytic Thinking in Tibetan Middle Way Philosophy in Advance. International Philosophical Quarterly.
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  11. Kenneth Liberman (2016). The Status of Analytic Thinking in Tibetan Middle Way Philosophy. International Philosophical Quarterly 56 (2):137-153.
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  12.  4
    Igor Primorac (1987). Middle Way in the Philosophy of Punishment (in Serbo-Croatian). Filozofska Istrazivanja:261-282.
    The paper is a critical examination of the main attempts at a reconciliation of the two theories of legal punishment: the utilitarian and the retributive. four middle-of-the-road theories of punishment are discussed with hart's theory offering a genuine synthesis of two approaches (negative retribution and positive retribution). (edited).
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  13.  8
    Kenneth K. Inada (1987). David J. Kalupahana, NigHrjuna, The Philosophy of the Middle Way. Journal of Chinese Philosophy 14 (3):371-377.
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  14.  1
    Arthur L. Herman (1987). David Kalupahana's "Nagarjuna: The Philosophy of The Middle Way". [REVIEW] Journal of Chinese Philosophy 14 (1):111.
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  15. Cathy B. Glenn (2012). A Middle Way: Process Philosophy and Critical Communication Inquiry. Empedocles: European Journal for the Philosophy of Communication 4 (2):113-131.
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  16. David J. Kalupahana (1988). Nagarjuna: The Philosophy of the Middle Way. Religious Studies 24 (4):529-533.
     
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  17.  3
    Leonard J. Eslick (1988). Wisdom as Moderation: A Philosophy of the Middle Way. By Charles Hartshorne. Modern Schoolman 66 (1):80-83.
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  18.  2
    John Howie (1988). Wisdom as Moderation, A Philosophy of the Middle Way. Review of Metaphysics 41 (4):833-834.
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  19.  3
    Frank J. Hoffman (1988). David J. Kalupahana. Nagarjuna: The Philosophy of the Middle Way. Pp. 412. SUNY Series in Buddhist Studies. $16.95 ; $49.50 .David J. Kalupahana. The Principles of Buddhist Psychology. Pp. 236. SUNY Series in Buddhist Studies. $12.95 ; $39.50. [REVIEW] Religious Studies 24 (4):529.
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  20. Sami Pihlström (2010). Seeking the Middle Way in Pragmatist Philosophy of Religion: Two Case Studies of the Ethical Grounds of Metaphysics in Pragmatism: Buscando o Caminho Do Meio Na Filosofia Pragmatista da Religião: Dois Estudos de Caso Dos Fundamentos Éticos da Metafísica No Pragmatismo. Cognitio 11 (1).
     
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  21. Jay Garfield (1995). The Fundamental Wisdom of the Middle Way: Nāgārjuna's Mūlamadhyamakakārikā. Oxford University Press.
    For nearly two thousand years Buddhism has mystified and captivated both lay people and scholars alike. Seen alternately as a path to spiritual enlightenment, an system of ethical and moral rubrics, a cultural tradition, or simply a graceful philosophy of life, Buddhism has produced impassioned followers the world over. The Buddhist saint Nagarjuna, who lived in South India in approximately the first century CE, is undoubtedly the most important, influential, and widely studied Mahayana Buddhist philosopher. His many works include (...)
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  22.  17
    Garth Hallett (2003). A Middle Way to God. Oxford University Press.
    Charting a "middle way" between the extremes represented by Alvin Plantinga and Richard Swinburne, Garth Hallett explores the thesis that if belief in other minds is rational and true (as it surely is), so too is belief in God. He makes a strong case that when this parity claim is appropriately restricted to a single, sound other-minds belief, belief in God and belief in other minds do prove epistemically comparable. This result, and the distinctive path that leads to it, (...)
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  23.  28
    Sonam Thakchoe (2007). The Two Truths Debate: Tsongkhapa and Gorampa on the Middle Way. Wisdom Publications.
    All lineages of Tibetan Buddhism today claim allegiance to the philosophy of the Middle Way, the exposition of emptiness propounded by the second-century Indian master Nagarjuna. But not everyone interprets it the same way. A major faultline runs through Tibetan Buddhism around the interpretation of what are called the two truths-the deceptive truth of conventional appearances and the ultimate truth of emptiness. An understanding of this faultline illuminates the beliefs that separate the Gelug descendents of Tsongkhapa from contemporary (...)
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  24.  22
    Miriam Galston, The Middle Way: What Contemporary Liberal Legal Theorists Can Learn From Aristotle.
    American legal theorists frequently ask whether and how theorists, citizens, lawmakers, judges, and other public officials can attain truth, correctness, or certainty in their legal and moral views. This essay discusses the views of contemporary liberal legal theorists who have attempted to answer these questions in a way that is neither objectivist nor formalist, on the one hand, nor subjectivist or relativist, on the other, referring to authors that make up this group as theorists of the "middle way." The (...)
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  25. Garth L. Hallett (2000). A Middle Way to God. Oxford University Press Usa.
    Charting a "middle way" between the extremes represented by Alvin Plantinga and Richard Swinburne, Garth Hallett explores the thesis that if belief in other minds is rational and true, so too is belief in God. He makes a strong case that when this parity claim is appropriately restricted to a single, sound other-minds belief, belief in God and belief in other minds do prove epistemically comparable. This result, and the distinctive path that leads to it, will interest students and (...)
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  26.  57
    Robert M. Ellis (2011). A Theory of Moral Objectivity. Lulu.Com.
    An inter-disciplinary philosophical treatise (written as an accredited Ph.D. thesis) that attempts to establish a new approach to moral objectivity. Inspired by the Buddha's Middle Way, but arguing from first premises, it challenges widespread and interlinked assumptions in both analytic and continental philosophy, whilst drawing on both these traditions together with psychological, religious and historical evidence. The first section of the book provides a detailed critique of existing approaches to ethics in the Western tradition. The second half then (...)
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  27. Roy W. Perrett (2000). Buddhism, Abortion and the Middle Way. Asian Philosophy 10 (2):101 – 114.
    What have modern Buddhist ethicists to say about abortion and is there anything to be learned from it? A number of writers have suggested that Buddhism (particularly Japanese Buddhism) does indeed have something important to offer here: a response to the dilemma of abortion that is a 'middle way' between the pro-choice and pro-life extremes that have polarised the western debate. I discuss what this suggestion might amount to and present a defence of its plausibility.
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  28. Gregory Bassham & Eric Bronson (eds.) (2012). The Hobbit and Philosophy: For When You've Lost Your Dwarves, Your Wizard, and Your Way. Wiley.
     
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  29. Nicolas Berggruen (2013). Intelligent Governance for the 21st Century: A Middle Way Between West and East. Polity.
    For decades, liberal democracy has been extolled as the best system of governance to have emerged out of the long experience of history. Today, such a confident assertion is far from self-evident. Democracy, in crisis across the West, must prove itself. In the West today, the authors argue, we no longer live in "industrial democracies," but "consumer democracies" in which the governing ethos has ended up drowning households and governments in debt and resulted in paralyzing partisanship. In contrast, the long-term (...)
     
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  30.  59
    Peter Vernezze (2008). Moderation or the Middle Way: Two Approaches to Anger. Philosophy East and West 58 (1):2-16.
    : Most of us tend to be Aristotelians when it comes to anger. While admitting that uncontrolled anger is harmful and ought to be avoided, we reject as undesirable a state of being that would not allow us to express legitimate outrage. Hence, we seem to find a compelling moral attitude in Aristotle’s belief that we should get angry at the right time and for the right reasons and in the right way. Buddhism and Stoicism, however, carve out a position (...)
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  31.  48
    D. S. Duckworth (2010). Mipam's Middle Way Through Yogācāra and Prāsaṅgika. Journal of Indian Philosophy 38 (4):431-439.
    In Tibet, the negative dialectics of Madhyamaka are typically identified with Candrakīrti’s interpretation of Nāgārjuna, and systematic epistemology is associated with Dharmakīrti. These two figures are also held to be authoritative commentators on a univocal doctrine of Buddhism. Despite Candrakīrti’s explicit criticism of Buddhist epistemologists in his Prasannapadā, Buddhists in Tibet have integrated the theories of Candrakīrti and Dharmakīrti in unique ways. Within this integration, there is a tension between the epistemological system-building on the one hand, and “deconstructive” negative dialectics (...)
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  32.  11
    Stefano Gandolfo (2016). The Positionless Middle Way: Weak Philosophical Deflationism in Madhyamaka. Journal of Indian Philosophy 44 (2):207-228.
    In this paper, I explore the connections between meta-ontological and meta-philosophical issues in two of Nāgārjuna’s primary works, the Mūlamadhyamakārikā and the Vigrahavyāvartanī. I argue for an interpretative framework that places Nāgārjuna’s Madhyamaka as a meta- and ultimately non-philosophical evaluation of philosophy. The paper’s primary argument is that an interpretative framework which makes explicit the meta-ontological and meta-philosophical links in Nāgārjuna’s thought is both viable and informative. Following Nāgārjuna, I start my analysis by looking at the positions that exist (...)
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  33.  8
    James Blumenthal (2004). The Ornament of the Middle Way: A Study of the Madhyamaka Thought of Śāntarakṣita: Including Translations of Śāntarakṣita's Madhyamakālamkāra (the Ornament of the Middle Way) and Gyel-Tsab's Dbu Ma Rgyan Gyi Brjed Byang (Remembering "the Ornament of the Middle Way"). Snow Lion Publications.
    This is the first book length study of the Madhyamaka thought of Shantaralshita in any Western language.
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  34.  36
    Robert M. Ellis (2011). A New Buddhist Ethics. Lulu.Com.
    This book is a survey of practical moral issues applying the Middle Way (as developed in 'A Theory of Moral Objectivity') as the basis of 'Buddhist' Ethics. No appeal is made to Buddhist traditions or scriptures, but instead the Middle Way is applied consistently as a universal philosophical and practical principle to suggest the direction of resolutions to moral debates. Practical ethics topics covered include sexual ethics, medical ethics, environmental ethics, animals, violence, the arts, scientific issues and political (...)
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  35.  74
    Robert M. Ellis (2011). The Trouble with Buddhism. Lulu.Com.
    This book is a philosophical critique of the Buddhist tradition (not a scholarly work about the Buddhist tradition), applying the standards of judgement developed in 'A Theory of Moral Objectivity'. It is argued that although the Buddhist tradition provides access to the insights of the Middle Way, many other aspects of Buddhist tradition are inconsistent with this central insight. The sources of justified belief in Buddhism, karma, conditionality, concepts of reality, monasticism and Buddhist ethics are all subjected to the (...)
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  36. Jay L. Garfield (2009). Nagarjuna's Mulamadhyamakakarika (Fundamental Verses of the Middle Way): Chapter 24: Examination of the Four Noble Truths. In Jay Garfield & William Edelgass (eds.), Buddhist Philosophy: Essential Readings. OUP Usa 26--34.
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  37.  5
    Richard Smith (1987). Skills: The Middle Way. Journal of Philosophy of Education 21 (2):197–201.
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  38.  21
    Jonas Olson (2012). Skorupski's Middle Way in Metaethics. [REVIEW] Philosophy and Phenomenological Research 85 (1):192-200.
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  39.  25
    Louis A. Sass (1986). The Middle Way: Charles Taylor on Knowledge and the Self. Theoretical and Philosophical Psychology 6 (1):49-54.
    Reviews the books, Philosophical papers, volume I: Human agency and language by Charles Taylor and Philosophical papers, volume II: Philosophy and the human sciences by Charles Taylor . Professor Taylor of McGill University is one of a number of thinkers who are attempting the difficult and important task of taking the social sciences "beyond objectivism and relativism." One of the foremost philosophers of his generation, Taylor has long devoted himself to study of the foundations of the social sciences, especially (...)
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  40.  12
    Charles Taliaferro (2003). A Middle Way to God. Philosophy and Phenomenological Research 67 (1):242-244.
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  41.  17
    John M. Koller (2000). Syādvāda as the Epistemological Key to the Jaina Middle Way Metaphysics of Anekāntavāda. Philosophy East and West 50 (3):400-407.
    An analysis of the Jain metaphysics of non-absolutism (anekāntavāda) shows how the epistemological theory of points of view (nayavāda) and the sevenfold schema of predication (saptabhaṅgī) provide a foundation for the central Jain principle of nonviolence (ahiṃsā).
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  42.  2
    Dan Arnold (1999). Review of The Fundamental Wisdom of the Middle Way: Nāgārjuna's Mūlamadhyamakakārikā by Jay L. Garfield. [REVIEW] Philosophy East and West 49 (1):88-92.
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  43.  1
    Dan Arnold (1999). The Fundamental Wisdom of the Middle Way: Naagaarjuna's Muulamadhyamakakaarikaa. Translation and Commentary by Jay L. Garfield. New York: Oxford University Press, 1995. Pp. Xix+ 372. [REVIEW] Philosophy East and West 49 (1):88-92.
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  44. D. Prithipaul (1982). Candrakïrti, Lucid Exposition of the Middle Way Reviewed By. Philosophy in Review 2 (6):268-270.
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  45. Thomas Doctor (2013). Reason and Experience in Tibetan Buddhism: Mabja Jangchub Tsöndrü and the Traditions of the Middle Way. Routledge.
    Based on newly discovered texts, this book explores the barely known but tremendously influential thought of the Tibetan Buddhist teacher, Mabja Jangchub Tsöndrü.This Tibetan Buddhist master exercised significant influence on the interpretation of Madhyamaka thinking in Tibet during the formative phase of Tibetan Buddhism and plays a key role in the religious thought of his day and beyond. The book studies the framework of Mabja’s philosophical project, holding it up against the works of both his own Madhyamaka teachers as well (...)
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  46. Jay L. Garfield & D. Arnold (1999). The Fundamental Wisdom of the Middle Way: Nagarjuna's Mulamadhyamakakarika, Translation and Commentary. Philosophy East and West 49:88-91.
     
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  47.  6
    John Sellars (2015). Shaftesbury, Stoicism, and Philosophy as a Way of Life. Sophia:1-14.
    This paper examines Shaftesbury’s reflections on the nature of philosophy in his Askêmata notebooks, which draw heavily on the Roman Stoics Epictetus and Marcus Aurelius. In what follows, I introduce the notebooks, outline Shaftesbury’s account of philosophy therein, compare it with his discussions of the nature of philosophy in his published works, and conclude by suggesting that Pierre Hadot’s conception of ‘philosophy as a way of life’ offers a helpful framework for thinking about Shaftesbury’s account of (...)
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  48.  50
    Matthew Lamb (2011). Philosophy as a Way of Life: Albert Camus and Pierre Hadot. Sophia 50 (4):561-576.
    This paper compares Pierre Hadot’s work on the history of philosophy as a way of life to the work of Albert Camus. I will argue that in the early work of Camus, up to and including the publication of The Myth of Sisyphus, there is evidence to support the notions that, firstly, Camus also identified these historical moments as obstacles to the practice of ascesis, and secondly, that he proceeded by orienting his own work toward overcoming these obstacles, (...)
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  49.  33
    J. R. N. Chiappin (2014). The Dynamical Theory of Knowledge in Duhem: A Middle Way Between the Classical Conception of Science and the Conventionalist/Pragmatist Conception. Trans/Form/Ação 37 (2):57-90.
    O objetivo é propor uma reconstrução racional da concepção da ciência de Duhem, por meio do recurso da metodologia da teoria da ciência, como uma teoria normativa da dinâmica do conhecimento. Essa reconstrução ajuda a estabelecer que Duhem não pode ser classificado como um convencionalista/pragmatista, como sugere a interpretação-padrão, e, além disso, que Duhem almeja construir uma concepção que seja um termo médio entre a concepção metafísica clássica e a concepção do convencionalismo/pragmatismo. A estratégia metodológica para construir esse termo médio (...)
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  50.  58
    Ernan McMullin (1990). Comment: Duhem's Middle Way. Synthese 83 (3):421 - 430.
    Duhem attempted to find a middle way between two positions he regarded as extremes, the conventionalism of Poincaré and the scientific realism of the majority of his scientific colleagues. He argued that conventionalism exaggerated the arbitrariness of scientific formulations, but that belief in atoms and electrons erred in the opposite direction by attributing too much logical force to explanatory theories. The instrumentalist sympathies so apparent in Duhem's writings on the history of astronomy are only partially counterbalanced by his view (...)
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