Search results for 'Mihael Rudes' (try it on Scholar)

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  1. Rajna Golubic, Mihael Rudes, Natasa Kovacic, Matko Marusic & Ana Marusic (2008). Calculating Impact Factor: How Bibliographical Classification of Journal Items Affects the Impact Factor of Large and Small Journals. Science and Engineering Ethics 14 (1):41-49.score: 120.0
    As bibliographical classification of published journal items affects the denominator in this equation, we investigated how the numerator and denominator of the impact factor (IF) equation were generated for representative journals in two categories of the Journal Citation Reports (JCR). We performed a full text search of the 1st-ranked journal in 2004 JCR category “Medicine, General and Internal” (New England Journal of Medicine, NEJM, IF = 38.570) and 61st-ranked journal (Croatian Medical Journal, CMJ, IF = 0.690), 1st-ranked journal in (...)
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  2. Mihael Rudes Rajna Golubic, Matko Marusic Natasa Kovacic & Ana Marusic (2008). Calculating Impact Factor: How Bibliographical Classification of Journal Items Affects the Impact Factor of Large and Small Journals. Science and Engineering Ethics 14 (1).score: 15.0
    As bibliographical classification of published journal items affects the denominator in this equation, we investigated how the numerator and denominator of the impact factor (IF) equation were generated for representative journals in two categories of the Journal Citation Reports (JCR). We performed a full text search of the 1st-ranked journal in 2004 JCR category “Medicine, General and Internal” ( New England Journal of Medicine , NEJM , IF = 38.570) and 61st-ranked journal ( Croatian Medical Journal , CMJ , (...)
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  3. Maurizio Costa (2004). È ancora attuale per la Compagnia di Gesù l'insegnamento della dottrina cristiana ai pueri ac rudes? Gregorianum 85 (1):88-112.score: 9.0
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  4. S. J. V. Malloch (2001). Who Were the Rudes Nepotes at Tacitus, Ann. 4.8.3? Classical Quarterly 51 (2):628-631.score: 9.0
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  5. Pekka Väyrynen (2013). The Lewd, the Rude and the Nasty: A Study of Thick Concepts in Ethics. Oxford University Press.score: 4.0
    In addition to thin concepts like the good, the bad and the ugly, our evaluative thought and talk appeals to thick concepts like the lewd and the rude, the selfish and the cruel, the courageous and the kind -- concepts that somehow combine evaluation and non-evaluative description. Thick concepts are almost universally assumed to be inherently evaluative in content, and many philosophers claimed them to have deep and distinctive significance in ethics and metaethics. In this first book-length treatment of thick (...)
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  6. Emrys Westacott (2006). The Rights and Wrongs of Rudeness. International Journal of Applied Philosophy 20 (1):1-22.score: 4.0
    Rudeness is normally viewed as a moral failing, but there are times when it is excusable or even justified. In this article I propose a definition of the concept that helps us ascertain whether, why, and to what extent a rude action is blameworthy or excusable. I consider the most common sorts of circumstance in which rudeness is morally acceptable, and I argue that the perceived increase in rudeness is, in large part, a consequence of our living in a dynamic (...)
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  7. James W. Heisig & John C. Maraldo (eds.) (1995). Rude Awakenings: Zen, the Kyoto School, & the Question of Nationalism. University of Hawai'i Press.score: 3.0
    Zen Buddhist Attitudes to War HIRATA Seiko IN ORDER FULLY TO UNDERSTAND the standpoint of Zen on the question of nationalism, one must first consider the ...
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  8. Mihael Woods (1984). Sellars on Kantian Intuitions. Philosophia 14 (1-2):137-143.score: 3.0
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  9. Anne Lloyd Thomas (1965). Facts and Rudeness. Mind 74 (295):399-410.score: 3.0
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  10. Mary Ducey (2012). "The Virtue of Our Vices: A Modest Defense of Gossip, Rudeness, and Other Bad Habits," by Emrys Westacott. Teaching Philosophy 35 (4):425-426.score: 3.0
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  11. Peter Suber, Logical Rudeness.score: 3.0
    Consider the following exchanges: 1. Gerda: So you believe that all belief is the product of custom and circumstance (or: childhood buffets, class struggle...). Isn't that position self-limiting? Mustn't you see yourself as reflecting only a single complex of circumstances? Grobian: Your objection is inapplicable, for it is merely the product of blind forces. Moreover, your childhood buffets were pernicious and regrettable, for they have set you against this truth.
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  12. Samuel Gorovitz (1992). Rude Logic. Hastings Center Report 22 (3):42-43.score: 3.0
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  13. Thomas H. Murray (1985). The Final, Anticlimactic Rude on Baby Doe. Hastings Center Report 15 (3):5-9.score: 3.0
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  14. Paul Siwek (1969). L'Unité die l'Organisme du Point de vue philosophique. Revista Portuguesa de Filosofia 25 (3/4):223 - 233.score: 3.0
    Un des problèmes les plus controversés en bioiogie philosophique, c'est l'unité de l'être vivant. Cette unité est tout à fait sui generis. En effet, nous nen trouvons aucun analogon dans la Nature inorganique. L'unite de l'eau, par exemple, c'est sa molécule dont nous connaissons bien la formule essentielle (H₂O). L'eau contenue dans un récipient, c'est une foule d'individus. Au contraire, l'être vivant, malgré le nombre immense de molécules dont il se compose, constitue un être parfaitement un. La preuve? C'est l'unité (...)
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  15. Mihael Balošić (2011). Molitvenik. Kairos: Evanđeoski Teološki Časopis 5 (1):159-164.score: 3.0
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  16. A. Ule (2002). Logik Und Kalkül. Zur Kritik France Vebers an der Mathematischen Logik. Grazer Philosophische Studien 64 (1):119-135.score: 3.0
    In this paper I present and discuss the main objections of France Veber (1890- 1975) against mathematical logic in general and the work of Mihael Marki (1864-1939), the first modern logician in Slovenia, in particular. Marki tried to develop an algebra of logic in the spirit of Boole and Schröder, and thereby to provide an axiomatic system of syllogistics with the least number of axioms. Veber's general objection to this project was that it tries to represent the essential qualitative (...)
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  17. Richard M. Wenzlaff, Bryce Gibbs, Jennifer Vane & Tavia Whitney (2002). Negative Processing Biases Predict Subsequent Depressive Symptoms Stephanie S. Rude. Cognition and Emotion: May 2002 6 (3):423-440.score: 3.0
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  18. Matti Eklund (2011). What Are Thick Concepts? Canadian Journal of Philosophy 41 (1):25-49.score: 1.0
    Many theorists hold that there is, among value concepts, a fundamental distinction between thin ones and thick ones. Among thin ones are concepts like good and right. Among concepts that have been regarded as thick are discretion, caution, enterprise, industry, assiduity, frugality, economy, good sense, prudence, discernment, treachery, promise, brutality, courage, coward, lie, gratitude, lewd, perverted, rude, glorious, graceful, exploited, and, of course, many others. Roughly speaking, thick concepts are value concepts with significant descriptive content. I will discuss a number (...)
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  19. Linda Zagzebski (2003). Emotion and Moral Judgment. Philosophy and Phenomenological Research 66 (1):104–124.score: 1.0
    This paper argues that an emotion is a state of affectively perceiving its intentional object as falling under a "thick affective concept" A, a concept that combines cognitive and affective aspects in a way that cannot be pulled apart. For example, in a state of pity an object is seen as pitiful, where to see something as pitiful is to be in a state that is both cognitive and affective. One way of expressing an emotion is to assert that the (...)
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  20. Theodore Sider (2003). Reductive Theories of Modality. In Michael J. Loux & Dean W. Zimmerman (eds.), The Oxford Handbook of Metaphysics. Oxford University Press. 180-208.score: 1.0
    Logic begins but does not end with the study of truth and falsity. Within truth there are the modes of truth, ways of being true: necessary truth and contingent truth. When a proposition is true, we may ask whether it could have been false. If so, then it is contingently true. If not, then it is necessarily true; it must be true; it could not have been false. Falsity has modes as well: a false proposition that could not have been (...)
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  21. Graham Harman (2011). Meillassoux's Virtual Future. Continent 1 (2):78-91.score: 1.0
    continent. 1.2 (2011): 78-91. This article consists of three parts. First, I will review the major themes of Quentin Meillassoux’s After Finitude . Since some of my readers will have read this book and others not, I will try to strike a balance between clear summary and fresh critique. Second, I discuss an unpublished book by Meillassoux unfamiliar to all readers of this article, except those scant few that may have gone digging in the microfilm archives of the École normale (...)
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  22. Abraham Sesshu Roth, Shared Agency. Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy.score: 1.0
    Sometimes individuals act together, and sometimes each acts on his or her own. It's a distinction that often matters to us. Undertaking a difficult task collectively can be comforting, even if only for the solidarity it may engender. Or, to take a very different case, the realization (or delusion) that the many bits of rudeness one has been suffering of late are part of a concerted effort can be of significance in identifying what one is up against: the accumulation of (...)
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  23. Brent Adkins (2009). True Freedom: Spinoza's Practical Philosophy. Lexington Books.score: 1.0
    Introduction -- Spinoza : a user's guide -- The curious incident of the rude driver in the SUV -- What's love got to do with it? -- On not being oneself or the shmoopy effect -- The big picture -- What is mind? : no matter : what is matter? : never mind -- True freedom -- Bodies in motion -- The body politic -- Religion -- The environment -- Conclusion: How to be a Spinozist in three easy steps.
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  24. William H. Freivogel & Laura Hlavach (2011). Ethical Implications of Anonymous Comments Posted to Online News Stories. Journal of Mass Media Ethics 26 (1):21-37.score: 1.0
    Many news organizations invite readers to post online comments to news stories. Comments may get posted automatically and most are signed with pseudonyms. Many are insensitive, even rude, and use speculation and language that would be rejected if written by a staff member or in a letter to the editor. Are news organizations holding true to their ethical guidelines when they publish anonymous reader comments on their Web sites while rejecting them for their hard-copy editions?
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  25. Paul Vincent Spade, Thoughts, Words and Things: An Introduction to Late Mediaeval Logic and Semantic Theory.score: 1.0
    The “dragon” that graces the cover of this volume has a story that goes with it. In the summer of 1980, I was on the teaching staff of the Summer Institute on Medieval Philosophy held at Cornell University under the direction of Norman Kretzmann and the auspices of the Council for Philosophical Studies and the National Endowment for the Humanities. While I was giving a series of lectures there (lectures that contribute to this volume, as it turns out), I went (...)
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  26. Pier Jaarsma, Petra Gelhaus & Stellan Welin (2012). Living the Categorical Imperative: Autistic Perspectives on Lying and Truth Telling–Between Kant and Care Ethics. [REVIEW] Medicine, Health Care and Philosophy 15 (3):271-277.score: 1.0
    Lying is a common phenomenon amongst human beings. It seems to play a role in making social interactions run more smoothly. Too much honesty can be regarded as impolite or downright rude. Remarkably, lying is not a common phenomenon amongst normally intelligent human beings who are on the autism spectrum. They appear to be ‘attractively morally innocent’ and seem to have an above average moral conscientious objection against deception. In this paper, the behavior of persons with autism with regard to (...)
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  27. David Mazella (2007). The Making of Modern Cynicism. University of Virginia Press.score: 1.0
    Initroduction : From the man of reason to the cynical insider -- Diogenes of Sinope and philosophy as a way of life -- Diogenes the cynic as "counsellor" and malcontent in early modern England -- From rude cynics to "cynical revilers" -- The cynic unveiled : innocence, disenchantment, and rationalization in Rousseau -- Edmund Burke and the counter-enlightenment attack on the "philosopher of vanity" -- Cynicism and dandyism -- Epilogue : How not to talk about cynicism : a conclusion, and (...)
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  28. Paul Vincent Spade, A Note on the "Supposition Dragon".score: 1.0
    In the summer of 1980, I was privileged to be on the teaching staff of the Summer Institute on Medieval Philosophy held at Cornell University under the direction of Norman Kretzmann and the auspices of the Council for Philosophical Studies and the National Endowment for the Humanities. While I was giving a series of lectures on supposition theory, I went to my office one morning, and there under the door some anonymous wag from the Institute had slid the pen and (...)
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  29. Michael Wreen (2013). A P.S. On B.S.: Some Remarks on Humbug and Bullshit. Metaphilosophy 44 (1-2):105-115.score: 1.0
    While lies have attracted philosophical attention since antiquity, phenomena in the near area have generated considerably less interest. Lately, however, Max Black and Harry Frankfurt have visited a close relative: humbug or bullshit, as it's either more politely or more rudely called. In this article their views on humbug and bullshit are exposed, explained, critiqued, and, ultimately, rejected. An alternative view is then proposed and defended.
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  30. Amy Olberding (2014). Subclinical Bias, Manners, and Moral Harm. Hypatia 29 (2):287-302.score: 1.0
    Mundane and often subtle forms of bias generate harms that can be fruitfully understood as akin to the harms evident in rudeness. Although subclinical expressions of bias are not mere rudeness, like rudeness they often manifest through the breach of mannerly norms for social cooperation and collaboration. At a basic level, the perceived harm of mundane forms of bias often has much to do with feeling oneself unjustly or arbitrarily cut out of a group, a group that cooperates and collaborates (...)
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  31. Michael A. Peters (2011). In Vino Veritas : In Wine the Truth. Journal of Aesthetic Education 45 (3):114-117.score: 1.0
    For sensible men I prepare only three kraters: one for health (which they drink first), the second for love and pleasure, and the third for sleep. After the third one is drained, wise men go home. The fourth krater is not mine any more—it belongs to bad behaviour; the fifth is for shouting; the sixth is for rudeness and insults; the seventh is for fights; the eighth is for breaking the furniture; the ninth is for depression; the tenth is for (...)
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  32. J. R. Lucas, An Academy for Non-Academics.score: 1.0
    One of the great virtues of Oxford is that most of its members are not academics, nor ever supposed that they sould be. They come to Oxford for three or four years and then go on their way to other occupations in "the service of God in Church and State". It is not that they were not good enough to become dons: it is simply that they had other fish to fry, and would rather be a barrister, a Member of (...)
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  33. Maja Mil (1997). The Notion of Feminine in Asian Philosophical Traditions. Asian Philosophy 7 (3):195 – 205.score: 1.0
    The abstract notion of “the feminine”, (womanliness, feminine nature)—in French, le f minin, and in German, das Weibliche —as substantivum neutrum, remains together with its opposite, the masculine, connotative of an inherent disparity. It is meant neither as the biological affiliation of sex, nor as gender, the social response, or echo, of this biological affiliation. Rather, it is the spiritual attitude (psychic, spiritual being, mind) which is the norm for psychic manifestations in general, and is its subtle psychosomatic background. (...)
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  34. Stephen David Ross (2010). Counter-Memory. International Studies in Philosophy Monograph Series:139-158.score: 1.0
    there is something else to which we are witness, and which we might describe as an insurrection of subjugated knowledges. (Foucault, 2L, 81)a whole set of knowledges that have been disqualified as inadequate to their task or insufficiently elaborated: naive knowledges, . . . . (82)What emerges out of this is something one might call a genealogy, or rather a multiplicity of genealogical researches, a painstaking rediscovery of struggles together with the rude memory of their conflicts. (83)Let us give the (...)
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  35. W. F. Bynum (1984). Charles Lyell's "Antiquity of Man" and Its Critics. Journal of the History of Biology 17 (2):153 - 187.score: 1.0
    It should be clear that Lyell's scientific contemporaries would hardly have agreed with Robert Munro's remark that Antiquity of Man created a full-fledged discipline. Only later historians have judged the work a synthesis; those closer to the discoveries and events saw it as a compilation — perhaps a “capital compilation,”95 but a compilation none the less. Its heterogeneity made it difficult to judge as a unity, and most reviewers, like Forbes, concentrated on the first part of Lyell's trilogy. The chapters (...)
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  36. Rory J. Conces (2008). Coming to Grips with the Queer Festival and Deeper Concerns. Bosnia Daily (September 8):9.score: 1.0
    There has been a great deal of talk about the upcoming Queer Festival in Sarajevo. However, the discussion has taken on a bitter tone because some have made much of the fact that the organizers plan to hold the festival during the month of Ramadan. To hold the festival during that time, according to some pious Muslims, is a blasphemous act, one that is rude and disrespectful towards those of the faith. Of course, we must not forget that this festival (...)
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  37. Thomas M. Osborne Jr (2014). Human Action in Thomas Aquinas, John Duns Scotus, and William of Ockham. The Catholic University of America Press.score: 1.0
    Thomas M. Osborne Jr. ... Vivarium 32 (1994): 62–71. te Velde, Rude A. “Natura in se ipsa recurva est: Duns Scotus and Aquinas on the Relationship between Nature and Will.” In John Duns Scotus: ... “William of Ockham's Theological Ethics .
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  38. António Tomas Ana & Patrício Batsîkama (2008). Etonian Jusphilosophy. Proceedings of the Xxii World Congress of Philosophy 28:13-28.score: 1.0
    The term etonism is from «Etona» that means flag, marks, evidence, and reason in Kikôngo. The variants in Umbûndu: etonolo or etonuilo means, allegations, reasons, indulgence (tolerance). The Nyaneka form is etŏnya: 1) reasons, 2) allegations, 3) indulgence and 5) the justice and the tolerance. Etona is Angolan artist (sculptor/painter). In his sculpture they are morphologically evidenced three treatments in the surface of the matter, namely 1) flat treatment; 2) rude treatment and finally 3) accidental treatment. Each one is a (...)
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  39. Simon Kirchin (ed.) (2013). Thick Concepts. OUP Oxford.score: 1.0
    An international team of experts explores the distinction between 'thin' concepts (general, evaluative terms like 'good' and 'bad') and 'thick' concepts (more specific concepts, such as 'brave', or 'rude'). Their essays touch on key debates in metaethics about the evaluative and normative, and raise fascinating questions about how language works.
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  40. L. de Heuscb & R. Blohm (1972). Myths and the Convulsions of History. Diogenes 20 (78):64-86.score: 1.0
    Some original forms of state emerge from the clan structures in central Africa in the 16th and 17th centuries, beyond the reach of any European influence. The oral epic traditions which echo these events draw from the founts of Bantu mythic thought. The Luba national epic recounts the dramatic origin of its sacred royalty and describes the passage from a primitive culture to a refined civilization, from an uneventful history to one full of movement; but above all it abandons itself (...)
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  41. Torill Strand (2014). 'Experience is Our Great and Only Teacher': A Peircean Reading of Wim Wenders' Wings of Desire. Journal of Philosophy of Education 48 (2):n/a-n/a.score: 1.0
    Wim Wenders' film Wings of Desire tells the story of an angel who wishes to become mortal in order to know the simple joy of human life. Told from the angel's point of view, the film is shot in black and white. But at the very instant the angel perceives the realities of human experience, the film blossoms into colour. In this article, I use this film to illustrate and explore Peirce's notion of experience and his claim that ‘experience is (...)
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  42. Timothy Boggs, Charles B. Keely, John P. Sikula, Elliott S. M. Gatner, Dwight W. Allen, Frederick H. Stutz, Dan Landis, David A. Potter, Joseph M. Scandura, Larry S. Bowen, Jay M. Smith, Gerald Kulm, Barak Rosenshine, Lawrence M. Knolle, Jacquelin A. Stitt, Joan K. Smith, Nicholas F. Rayder, B. R. Bugelski, Karen F. Swoope, Joan Duff Kise, Robert S. Means, Gladys H. Means, Stanley H. Rude & James E. Ysseldyke (2011). Book Review Section 4. [REVIEW] Educational Studies 5 (1-2):78-97.score: 1.0
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  43. Jan Van Bragt (1995). Kyoto Philosophy—Intrinsically Nationalistic? In James W. Heisig & John C. Maraldo (eds.), Rude Awakenings: Zen, the Kyoto School, & the Question of Nationalism. University of Hawai'i Press.score: 1.0
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  44. Kevin Doak (1995). Nationalism as Dialectics: Ethnicity, Moralism, and the State in Early Twentieth-Century Japan. In James W. Heisig & John C. Maraldo (eds.), Rude Awakenings: Zen, the Kyoto School, & the Question of Nationalism. University of Hawai'i Press. 174--96.score: 1.0
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  45. Jeremy Fernando (2011). On Love and Poetry. Or, Where Philosophers Fear to Tread. Continent 1 (1):27-32.score: 1.0
    continent. 1.1 (2011): 27-32. “My”—what does this word designate? Not what belongs to me, but what I belong to,what contains my whole being, which is mine insofar as I belong to it. Søren Kierkegaard. The Seducer’s Diary . I can’t sleep till I devour you / And I’ll love you, if you let me… Marilyn Manson “Devour” The role of poetry in the relationalities between people has a long history—from epic poetry recounting tales of yore; to emotive lyric poetry; to (...)
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  46. Mary Midgley (2007). Owl of Minerva: A Memoir. Routledge.score: 1.0
    One of the UK’s foremost living moral philosophers, Mary Midgley recounts her remarkable story in this elegiac and moving account of friendships found and lost, bitter philosophical battles and of a profound love of teaching. In spite of her many books and public profile, little is known about Mary’s life. Part of a famous generation of women philosophers that includes Elizabeth Anscombe, Philippa Foot, Mary Warnock and Iris Murdoch, Midgley tells us in vivid and humorous fashion how they cut a (...)
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  47. Mary Midgley (2005). The Owl of Minerva: A Memoir. Routledge.score: 1.0
    "Charming, interesting, thought-provoking and a great read." Rosalind Hursthouse The daughter of a pacifist rector who answered "No!" when his congregation asked him "Is everything in the bible true?", perhaps Mary Midgley was destined to become a philosopher. Yet few would have thought this inquisitive, untidy, nature-loving child would become "one of the sharpest critical pens in the west." This is her remarkable story. Probably the only philosopher to have been in Vienna on the eve of its invasion by Nazi (...)
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  48. Ryoen Minamoto (1995). The Symposium on 'Overcoming Modemity. In James W. Heisig & John C. Maraldo (eds.), Rude Awakenings: Zen, the Kyoto School, & the Question of Nationalism. University of Hawai'i Press.score: 1.0
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  49. Remi Rajani (2008). Religion for Practical Affairs. Proceedings of the Xxii World Congress of Philosophy 45:299-304.score: 1.0
    Unlike majority of classical and contemporary Indian philosophers, Gandhi was a practical philosopher, an experimentalist and a laboratiorian who developed practical instruments and carried out experiments for the existing life problems without bothering to build a consistent structure of philosophy. For this very reason there seems an ambiguity to call Gandhi as a philosopher. However, it seems to me that Gandhi was a practical philosopher who laid a pragmatic approach and method to his new insights for social and political action (...)
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  50. Stephanie Rude & Christopher McCarthy (2003). Brief Report. Cognition and Emotion 17 (5):799-806.score: 1.0
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