Search results for 'Mike Barber' (try it on Scholar)

990 found
Sort by:
  1. Mike Barber (1999). Philip Blosser: Scheler's Critique of Kant's Ethics. [REVIEW] Continental Philosophy Review 32 (1):105-110.score: 240.0
  2. Michael D. Barber (1998). Ethical Hermeneutics: Rationality in Enrique Dussel's Philosophy of Liberation. Fordham University Press.score: 60.0
    The essence of Dussel's thought is presented through the concept of "ethical hermeneutics" which seeks to interpret reality from the viewpoint of what Emmanuel Levinas presents as the "other" - those who are vanquished, forgotten, or excluded from existent socio-political or cultural systems. Barber traces Dussel's development toward Levinas' philosophy through his discussion of the Hegelian dialectic and through the stages of Dussel's own ethical theory.
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  3. Michael D. Barber (2008). Holism and Horizon: Husserl and McDowell on Non-Conceptual Content. [REVIEW] Husserl Studies 24 (2):79-97.score: 30.0
    John McDowell rejects the idea that non-conceptual content can rationally justify empirical claims—a task for which it is ill-fitted by its non-conceptual nature. This paper considers three possible objections to his views: he cannot distinguish empty conception from the perceptual experience of an object; perceptual discrimination outstrips the capacity of concepts to keep pace; and experience of the empirical world is more extensive than the conceptual focusing within it. While endorsing McDowell’s rejection of what he means by non-conceptual content, and (...)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  4. Michael D. Barber (2008). Autonomy, Reciprocity, and Responsibility: Darwall and Levinas on the Second Person. International Journal of Philosophical Studies 16 (5):629 – 644.score: 30.0
    Stephen Darwall's The Second-Person Standpoint converges with Emmanuel Levinas's concern about the role of the second-person relationship in ethics. This paper contrasts their methodologies (regressive analysis of presuppositions versus phenomenology) to explain Darwall's narrower view of ethical experience in terms of expressed reactive attitudes. It delineates Darwall's overall justificatory strategy and the centrality of autonomy and reciprocity within it, in contrast to Levinas's emphasis on the experience of responsibility. Asymmetrical responsibility plays a more foundational role as a critical counterpoint to (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  5. Alex Barber (ed.) (2003). Epistemology of Language. Oxford University Press.score: 30.0
    What must linguistic knowledge be like if it is to explain our capacity to use language? All linguists and philosophers of language presuppose some answer to this critical question, but all too often the presupposition is tacit. In this collection of sixteen previously unpublished essays, a distinguished international line-up of philosophers and linguists address a variety of interconnected themes concerning our knowledge of language.
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  6. Alex Barber, Idiolects. Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy.score: 30.0
    An idiolect, if there is such a thing, is a language that can be characterised exhaustively in terms of intrinsic properties of some single person at a time, a person whose idiolect it is at that time. The force of ‘intrinsic’ is that the characterisation ought not to turn on features of the person's wider linguistic community. Some think that this notion of an idiolect is unstable, and instead use ‘idiolect’ to describe a person's incomplete or erroneous grasp of their (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  7. Alex Barber (2011). Hedonism and the Experience Machine. Philosophical Papers 40 (2):257 - 278.score: 30.0
    Philosophical Papers, Volume 40, Issue 2, Page 257-278, July 2011.
    No categories
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  8. Bernard Barber (1994). Talcott Parsons on the Social System: An Essay in Clarification and Elaboration. Sociological Theory 12 (1):101-105.score: 30.0
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  9. Kenneth Barber (1968). A Note on a Paradox of Analysis. Philosophical Studies 19 (3):37 - 43.score: 30.0
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  10. Alex Barber & Robert Stainton, Concise Encyclopedia of Philosophy of Language and Linguistics.score: 30.0
  11. Alex Barber (2006). Testimony and Illusion. Croatian Journal of Philosophy 6 (3):401-429.score: 30.0
    This paper considers a form of scepticism according to which sentences, along with other linguistic entities such as verbs and phonemes, etc., are never realized. If, whenever a conversational participant produces some noise or other, they and all other participants assume that a specific sentence has been realized (or, more colloquially, spoken), communication will be fluent whether or not the shared assumption is correct. That communication takes place is therefore, one might think, no ground for assuming that sentences are realized (...)
    Direct download (7 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  12. Alex Barber (1998). The Pleonasticity of Talk About Concepts. Philosophical Studies 89 (1):53-86.score: 30.0
    The paper aims to disarm arguments, prevalent in diverse philosophical contexts, that deny the legitimacy of attributions of propositional attitudes on the grounds that the putative subject lacks one or more of the requite concepts. Its strategy is to offer and defend an extremely minimal account on concept possession. The agenda of the paper broadens into a defence of the thesis that concepts are a linguistic epiphenomenon: talk about them emerges as the result of certain contingently available and pleonastic ways (...)
    Direct download (7 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  13. Alex Barber (2001). Idiolectal Error. Mind and Language 16 (3):263–283.score: 30.0
    A linguistic theory is correct exactly to the extent that it is the explicit statement of a body of knowledge possessed by a designated language-user. This popular psychological conception of the goal of linguistic theorizing is commonly paired with a preference for idiolectal over social languages, where it seems to be in the nature of idiolects that the beliefs one holds about one’s own are ipso facto correct. Unfortunately, it is also plausible that the correctness of a genuine belief cannot (...)
    Direct download (8 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  14. Alex Barber (2013). Understanding as Knowledge of Meaning. Philosophy Compass 8 (10):964-977.score: 30.0
    Testimony, the transmission of knowledge through communication, requires a shared understanding of linguistic expressions and utterances of them. Is this understanding itself a kind of knowledge, knowledge of meaning? The intuitive answer is ‘yes’, but the nature of such knowledge is controversial, as is the assumption that understanding is a kind of knowledge at all. This article is a critical examination of recent work on the nature and role of semantic knowledge in the generation of the linguistic understanding needed for (...)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  15. Michael Barber (2006). Philosophy and Reflection: A Critique of Frank Welz's Sociological and “Processual” Criticism of Husserl and Schutz. [REVIEW] Human Studies 29 (2):141 - 157.score: 30.0
    Frank Welz’s Kritik der Lebenswelt undertakes a sociology of knowledge criticism of the work of Edmund Husserl and Alfred Schutz that construes them as developing absolutist, egological systems opposed to the “processual” worldview prominent since the modern rise of natural science. Welz, though, misunderstands the work of Schutz and Husserl and neglects how their focus on consciousness and eidetic features pertains to the kind of reflection that one must undertake if one would avoid succumbing to absolutism, that uncovers the presuppositions (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  16. Michael D. Barber (2004). A Moment of Unconditional Validity? Schutz and the Habermas/Rorty Debate. Human Studies 27 (1):51-67.score: 30.0
    Richard Rorty challenges Jurgen Habermas's belief that validity-claims raised within context-bound discussions contain a moment of universality validity. Rorty argues that immersion within contingent languages prohibits any neutral, context-independent ground, that one cannot predict the defense of one's assertions before any audience, and that philosophy can no more escape its contextual limitations than strategic counterparts. Alfred Schutz's phenomenological account of motivation, the reciprocity of perspectives, and the theoretical province of meaning can articulate Habermas's intuitions.Since any claim can be analyzed from (...)
    Direct download (7 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  17. Michael D. Barber (2001). Sartre, Phenomenology and the Subjective Approach to Race and Ethnicity in Black Orpheus. Philosophy and Social Criticism 27 (3):91-103.score: 30.0
    While Appiah and Soyinka criticize racial essentializing in Sartre and the Negritude poets, Sartre in Black Orpheus interprets the Negritudinists as employing a phenomenological, anamnestic retrieval of subjective experience. This retrieval uncovers two ethical attitudes: a less exploitative approach toward nature, and a conversion of slavery’s suffering into a stimulus for universal liberation. These attitudes spring from peasant cultural traditions and ethical responses to others’ race-based cruelty, rather than emanating from mystified ‘blackness’. Alfred Schutz’s because-motive analysis, a process of narrative (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  18. Daniel Colucciello Barber (2009). On Post-Heideggerean Difference: Derrida and Deleuze. Southern Journal of Philosophy 47 (2):113-129.score: 30.0
    This paper takes up the Heideggerean question of difference. I argue that while Heidegger raises this question, his response to the question remains ambiguous and that this ambiguity pivots around the question of time. The bulk of the paper then looks at how Derrida and Deleuze respectively attempt to advance beyond Heidegger’s ambiguity regarding the questions of difference and time. Derrida is able to demonstrate the manner in which time—as delay—is constitutive of any attempt to think difference. I argue, however, (...)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  19. Kenneth Barber (1970). Meinong's Hume Studies: Part I: Meinong's Nominalism. Philosophy and Phenomenological Research 30 (4):550-567.score: 30.0
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  20. Alex Barber (2009). John Searle's Philosophy of Language: Force, Meaning and Mind • by Savas L. Tsohatzidis. Analysis 69 (2):368-369.score: 30.0
    Direct download (8 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  21. Michael D. Barber (2001). Rudi Visker, Truth and Singularity: Taking Foucault Into Phenomenology. [REVIEW] Continental Philosophy Review 34 (3):353-358.score: 30.0
    Direct download (7 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  22. Kenneth Barber (1971). Meinong's Hume Studies: Part II. Meinong's Analysis of Relations. Philosophy and Phenomenological Research 31 (4):564-584.score: 30.0
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  23. Benjamin R. Barber (1997). The New Telecommunications Technology: Endless Frontier or the End of Democracy? Constellations 4 (2):208-228.score: 30.0
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  24. Benjamin R. Barber (1985). How Swiss is Rousseau? Political Theory 13 (4):475-495.score: 30.0
  25. Michael D. Barber (2006). Phenomenology and Rigid Dualisms: Joachim Renn's Critique of Alfred Schutz. [REVIEW] Human Studies 29 (1):269 - 282.score: 30.0
    Joachim Renn argues that Schutz fails to integrate two fundamental strands in his work: phenomenology and pragmatism. Gaps between separated consciousnesses block synchronization and access to others, and objective symbol schemes, absorbed within the egological outlook, cannot bridge these gaps. Renn, however, construes phenomenology as practicing a solipsistic withdrawal of a self cut off from its environs, denies that contents correlative to individual intentional acts can be objective and common, and overlooks the intricacies of Schutz's descriptive methodology. Furthermore, for Renn, (...)
    No categories
    Direct download (9 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  26. N. W. Barber (2004). Must Legalistic Conceptions of the Rule of Law Have a Social Dimension? Ratio Juris 17 (4):474-488.score: 30.0
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  27. Sotirios A. Barber (2007). Liberalism and the Constitution. Social Philosophy and Policy 24 (1):234-265.score: 30.0
    If the U.S. Constitution is a liberal Constitution, liberal governments can have a constitutional obligation to secure positive benefits or welfare rights. The original constitutional text describes a government instrumental to the Preamble's abstract ends or goods. Constitutional rights can be reconciled to the text's instrumentalist logic by viewing them as functional to better conceptions of abstract ends among actors who would compensate for their fallibility. The Federalist confirms the instrumentalism of the constitutional text. Conservative writers who treat negative liberties (...)
    Direct download (7 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  28. Alex Barber (2007). Linguistic Structure and the Brain. Croatian Journal of Philosophy 7 (3):317-341.score: 30.0
    A popular interpretation of linguistic theories has it that they should describe the brain at a high level of abstraction. One way this has been understood is as the requirement that the theory’s derivational structure reflect (by being isomorphic to) relevant structural properties of the language user’s brain. An important criticisrn of this idea, made originally by Crispin Wright against Gareth Evans in the 1980s, still has purchase, notwithstanding attempts to reply to it, notably by Martin Davies and, indirectly, Christopher (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  29. Daniel Colucciello Barber (2011). The Power of Nothingness: Negative Thought in Agamben. Symposium: The Canadian Journal of Continental Philosophy 15 (1):49-71.score: 30.0
    This paper addresses the nature and value of Giorgio Agamben’s negative thought, which revolves around the theme of nothingness. I begin by observing the validity of negative thinking, and thus oppose those affirmative philosophies that reject Agamben’s thought simply on the basis of its negativity. Indeed, the importance of negative thought is set forth by Agamben’s attention to the specific biopolitical logic that governs the present. If we are to understand the present, then we must begin by understanding the nothingness (...)
    Direct download (7 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  30. Alex Barber (2003). Truth Conditions and Their Recognition. In , Epistemology of Language. Oxford University Press.score: 30.0
    This paper offers and defends a particular version of the view that it is the intentions with which it is performed that determine the truth conditions of an utterance. A competing version, implied by Grice's work on meaning, is rejected as inadequate. This latter is incompatible with the phenomenon of anti-lying: performing a true utterance with the intention that one's audience believe it to be false. In place of the quasi-Gricean version, the paper maintains that an utterance is true-iff-p just (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  31. Michael Barber (1991). The Cogito and Hermeneutics: The Question of the Subject in Ricoeur. By Domenico Jervolino. Modern Schoolman 68 (3):270-271.score: 30.0
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  32. Alex Barber (2000). A Pragmatic Treatment of Simple Sentences. Analysis 60 (4):300–308.score: 30.0
    Semanticists face substitution challenges even outside of contexts commonly recognized as opaque. Jennifer M. Saul has drawn attention to pairs of simple sentences - her term for sentences lacking a that-clause operator - of which the following are typical: (1) Clark Kent went into the phone booth, and Superman came out. (1*) Clark Kent went into the phone booth, and Clark Kent came out. (2) Superman is more successful with women than Clark Kent. (2*) Superman is more successful with women (...)
    No categories
    Direct download (12 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  33. Michael D. Barber (2006). Rorty's Ethical de-Divinization of the Moralist Self. Philosophy and Social Criticism 32 (1):135-147.score: 30.0
    This article examines Richard Rorty's approach to the self in Contingency, Irony, and Solidarity . In spite of their differing philosophical bases, Rorty and Emmanuel Levinas converge methodologically in their treatments of the self by avoiding paradigmatic notions of human nature and a philosophical project of justification. Although Rorty refuses to prioritize a moralist account of the self over its romanticist rivals, his presentation relies on the reader's response to the ethical appeal of the other as depicted by Levinas: Rorty (...)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  34. E. A. Barber (1951). The Fragments of Callimachus R. Pfeiffer: Callimachus. Volumen I: Fragmenta. Pp.Xiv + 520. Oxford: Clarendon Press, 1949. Cloth, 50s. Net. [REVIEW] The Classical Review 1 (02):78-80.score: 30.0
    No categories
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  35. Kenneth Barber (1975). Symposium: Metaphysical Explanation. Metaphilosophy 6 (3-4):259-260.score: 30.0
    No categories
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  36. Benjamin R. Barber (1996). An American Civic Forum: Civil Society Between Market Individuals and the Political Community. Social Philosophy and Policy 13 (01):269-.score: 30.0
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  37. Michael D. Barber (1987). Constitution and the Sedimentation of the Social in Alfred Schutz's Theory of Typification. Modern Schoolman 64 (2):111-120.score: 30.0
    No categories
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  38. Benjamin Barber (2013). Expositions of Sacrificial Logic: Girard, Žižek, and Cormac McCarthy's No Country for Old Men. Contagion 20 (1):163-179.score: 30.0
    Cormac McCarthy’s No Country for Old Men, and Joel and Ethan Coen’s film adaptation of the same name, deliver two separate critiques of sacrificial violence through their particular renderings of Carla Jean Moss’s death scene, as they correspond, respectively, to the theories of René Girard and Slavoj Žižek. In both film and novel, the chase narrative offers a concrete representation of runaway acquisitive mimesis engendering resentment and cathartic violence. This violence is symbolically manifest in the character of Anton Chigurh. An (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  39. Benjamin R. Barber (2007). Patrick J. Deneen, Democratic Faith:Democratic Faith. Ethics 117 (2):343-348.score: 30.0
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  40. John Barber (2005). Consciousness and Teleportation 6th Swiss Biennial on Science, Technics + Aesthetics Lucerne, Switzerland, January 22-23, 2005. [REVIEW] Journal of Consciousness Studies 12 (3):83-86.score: 30.0
    Every two years Rene Stettler, owner and director of the Neue Galerie in Luzerne, organizes and hosts the Swiss Biennial on Science, Technics + Aesthetics, an international gathering of scientists, philosophers, and artists for the purpose of discussing their views on a topic of general interest. Stettler has done this since 1995, with each conference centred on a thought-provoking topic. The topic of this year's conference focused on consciousness and teleportation. The conference publicity material posited some interesting discussion points: Are (...)
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  41. Michael Barber (2008). Epistemic and Ethical Intersubjectivity in Brandom and Levinas. Levinas Studies 3:35-60.score: 30.0
    As the first part of this essay will show, Robert Brandom has developed an impressive epistemological position that explains the structures of discourse in terms of an inferential semantics and a normative pragmatics, and that implies a version of epistemic intersubjectivity centered around the figure of the scorekeeper. The second part of this paper will show via a consideration of the Brandom/McDowell debate on perception how this version of intersubjectivity emphasizes a theoretical-critical, externalist stance toward the other whose claims are (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  42. Alex Barber (2013). Science's Immunity to Moral Refutation. Australasian Journal of Philosophy 91 (4):633-653.score: 30.0
    Our moral convictions cannot, on the face of it, count in evidence against scientific claims with which they happen to conflict. Moral anti-realists of whatever stripe can explain this easily: science is immune to moral refutation because moral discourse is defective as a trustworthy source of true and objective judgments. Moral realists, they can add, are unable to explain this immunity. After describing how anti-realists might implement this reasoning, the paper argues that the only plausible realist comeback turns on the (...)
    No categories
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  43. Benjamin R. Barber (1988). Spirit's Phoenix and History's Owl or the Incoherence of Dialectics in Hegel's Account of Women. Political Theory 16 (1):5-28.score: 30.0
  44. Michael Barber (1989). The Possibility of Transcendental Philosophy. By J. N. Mohanty. Modern Schoolman 67 (1):78-80.score: 30.0
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  45. R. L. N. Barber (1992). Aegean Civilizations René Treuil, Pascal Darcque, Jean-Claude Poursat, Gilles Touchais: Les Civilisations Égéennes du Néolithique Et de l'Âge du Bronze. (Nouvelle Clio, l'Histoire Et Ses Problèmes, 1.) Pp. Iv + 633; 64 Figs., 8 Maps. Paris: Presses Universitaires de France, 1989. Paper, Frs. 198. [REVIEW] The Classical Review 42 (01):132-135.score: 30.0
    No categories
    Translate to English
    | Direct download (2 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  46. E. A. Barber (1925). Knox's Cercidas The First Greek Anthologist. By A. D. Knox. One Vol. Pp. Xiv + 37. Cambridge: University Press, 1923. 3s. 6d. Net. [REVIEW] The Classical Review 39 (1-2):28-29.score: 30.0
    No categories
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  47. A. Barber, Co-Extensive Theories and Unembedded Definite Descriptions.score: 30.0
    Russell argued, famously, that definite descriptions are not logical constituents of the sentences in which they appear. In neither of the following should we suppose that the definite description picks anything out: The King of France is bald The Prince of Wales is bald Since France is a republic, nothing could be picked out by the first; and if the semantic structures of each are the same, it cannot be the function of the second to pick anything out either. On (...)
    No categories
    Translate to English
    | Direct download (2 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  48. Michael Barber (1994). Power and Control in Education 1944-2004. British Journal of Educational Studies 42 (4):348 - 362.score: 30.0
    This article examines the prospects for education over the next decade in the context of an analysis of the last fifty years of conflict and consensus over education policy. It begins with a look into the future and then turns back to 1944 to study the distribution of power under the Butler settlement. It then examines the pressures which broke up the Butler settlement and created the conditions for the market revolution of 1988 to 1994. It argues that in (...)
    No categories
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  49. Michael Barber (2010). Somatic Apprehension and Imaginative Abstraction: Cairns's Criticisms of Schutz's Criticisms of Husserl's Fifth Meditation. [REVIEW] Human Studies 33 (1):1-21.score: 30.0
    Dorion Cairns correctly interprets the preconstituted stratum of Edmund Husserl’s Fifth Cartesian Meditation to be the primordial ego and not the social world, as was thought by Alfred Schutz, who considered Husserl to be insufficiently attentive to the social world’s hold upon us. Following Cairns’s interpretation, which involves recovering and reconstructing strata that may never exist independently, one better understands how the transfer of sense animate organism involves automatic association, or somatic apprehension. This sense-transfer extends to any animate organism, not (...)
    Direct download (7 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
1 — 50 / 990