Search results for 'Mike Barber' (try it on Scholar)

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  1.  34
    Mike Barber (1999). Philip Blosser: Scheler's Critique of Kant's Ethics. [REVIEW] Continental Philosophy Review 32 (1):105-110.
  2. Michael D. Barber (1998). Ethical Hermeneutics: Rationality in Enrique Dussel's Philosophy of Liberation. Fordham University Press.
    The essence of Dussel's thought is presented through the concept of "ethical hermeneutics" which seeks to interpret reality from the viewpoint of what Emmanuel Levinas presents as the "other" - those who are vanquished, forgotten, or excluded from existent socio-political or cultural systems. Barber traces Dussel's development toward Levinas' philosophy through his discussion of the Hegelian dialectic and through the stages of Dussel's own ethical theory.
     
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  3. B. R. Barber (1997). Civil Society. De hernieuwde opbouw van een sterke democratie. Nexus 18:72-87.
    Met illustratie van citaten uit vele auteurs wordt een poging ondernomen om het begrip 'civil society' te definiëren. De voorkeur van Barber gaat uit naar een civil socity, dat als een derde kracht tussen regering en markt opereert, met als basis een sterk democratisch gehalte.
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  4. Bernard Barber (1998). Intellectual Pursuits: Toward an Understanding of Culture. Rowman & Littlefield Publishers.
    This book is a venture in constructive clarification of several basic topics in current humanities and social science discourses that are badly muddled. The heart of the clarification is contained in Barber's definition of culture, derived from social system theory, that provides us with a better understanding of today's debate on intellectuals and the pursuit of science. Barber examines the ways in which intellectual culture is defined, the construction of ideologies and ideologists, and the structure of cultural sub-systems.
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  5.  1
    Michael D. Barber (2011). The Intentional Spectrum and Intersubjectivity: Phenomenology and the Pittsburgh Neo-Hegelians. Ohio University Press.
    In The Intentional Spectrum and Intersubjectivity Michael D. Barber is the first to bring phenomenology to bear not just on the perspectives of McDowell or Brandom alone, but on their intersection.
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  6. Michael D. Barber (2008). Holism and Horizon: Husserl and McDowell on Non-Conceptual Content. Husserl Studies 24 (2):79-97.
    John McDowell rejects the idea that non-conceptual content can rationally justify empirical claims—a task for which it is ill-fitted by its non-conceptual nature. This paper considers three possible objections to his views: he cannot distinguish empty conception from the perceptual experience of an object; perceptual discrimination outstrips the capacity of concepts to keep pace; and experience of the empirical world is more extensive than the conceptual focusing within it. While endorsing McDowell’s rejection of what he means by non-conceptual content, and (...)
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  7. Benjamin Barber (2013). Expositions of Sacrificial Logic: Girard, Žižek, and Cormac McCarthy's No Country for Old Men. Contagion: Journal of Violence, Mimesis, and Culture 20 (1):163-179.
    Cormac McCarthy’s No Country for Old Men, and Joel and Ethan Coen’s film adaptation of the same name, deliver two separate critiques of sacrificial violence through their particular renderings of Carla Jean Moss’s death scene, as they correspond, respectively, to the theories of René Girard and Slavoj Žižek. In both film and novel, the chase narrative offers a concrete representation of runaway acquisitive mimesis engendering resentment and cathartic violence. This violence is symbolically manifest in the character of Anton Chigurh. An (...)
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  8.  13
    Peter W. Schuhmann, Robert T. Burrus, Preston D. Barber, J. Edward Graham & M. Fara Elikai (2013). Using the Scenario Method to Analyze Cheating Behaviors. Journal of Academic Ethics 11 (1):17-33.
    Using student self-reported cheating admissions and answers from a hypothetical cheating scenario, this paper analyzes the effects of individual and situational factors on potential cheating behavior. Results confirm several conclusions about student factors that are related to cheating. The probability of cheating is associated with younger students, lower GPAs, alcohol consumption, fraternity/sorority membership, and having cheated in high school. Student perceptions of the certainty and severity of punishment appear to have a negative and significant impact on the probability of cheating (...)
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  9.  44
    Alex Barber (2013). Science's Immunity to Moral Refutation. Australasian Journal of Philosophy 91 (4):633-653.
    Our moral convictions cannot, on the face of it, count in evidence against scientific claims with which they happen to conflict. Moral anti-realists of whatever stripe can explain this easily: science is immune to moral refutation because moral discourse is defective as a trustworthy source of true and objective judgments. Moral realists, they can add, are unable to explain this immunity. After describing how anti-realists might implement this reasoning, the paper argues that the only plausible realist comeback turns on the (...)
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  10. Alex Barber (2008). Sentence Realization Again. Croatian Journal of Philosophy 8 (2):233-240.
    Against criticism from Georges Rey I defend both my earlier account of sentence realization and my objection to his own ‘folie-a-deux’ account. The latter has two components, one sceptical (sentences and other standard linguistic entities are rarely if ever realized [‘produced’, ‘tokened’, ‘uttered’]) and the other optimistic (this is a benign outcome since communication is unaffected by our being mistaken in assuming that they are realized). Both components are flawed, notwithstanding Rey’s defence. My non-sceptical account of sentence realization avoids the (...)
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  11. Alex Barber (2000). A Pragmatic Treatment of Simple Sentences. Analysis 60 (4):300–308.
    Semanticists face substitution challenges even outside of contexts commonly recognized as opaque. Jennifer M. Saul has drawn attention to pairs of simple sentences - her term for sentences lacking a that-clause operator - of which the following are typical: -/- (1) Clark Kent went into the phone booth, and Superman came out. (1*) Clark Kent went into the phone booth, and Clark Kent came out. -/- (2) Superman is more successful with women than Clark Kent. (2*) Superman is more successful (...)
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  12. Alex Barber (2013). Understanding as Knowledge of Meaning. Philosophy Compass 8 (10):964-977.
    Testimony, the transmission of knowledge through communication, requires a shared understanding of linguistic expressions and utterances of them. Is this understanding itself a kind of knowledge, knowledge of meaning? The intuitive answer is ‘yes’, but the nature of such knowledge is controversial, as is the assumption that understanding is a kind of knowledge at all. This article is a critical examination of recent work on the nature and role of semantic knowledge in the generation of the linguistic understanding needed for (...)
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  13. Bernard Barber (1978). Science and the Social Order. Greenwood Press.
     
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  14. Kenneth Barber (1970). Meinong's Hume Studies: Part I: Meinong's Nominalism. Philosophy and Phenomenological Research 30 (4):550-567.
  15.  71
    Richard L. Barber (1958). Philosophic Disagreement and the Study of Philosophy. Tulane Studies in Philosophy 7:27-33.
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  16.  88
    Alex Barber (2011). Hedonism and the Experience Machine. Philosophical Papers 40 (2):257 - 278.
    Money isn’t everything, so what is? Many government leaders, social policy theorists, and members of the general public have a ready answer: happiness. This paper examines an opposing view due to Robert Nozick, which centres on his experience-machine thought experiment. Despite the example's influence among philosophers, the argument behind it is riddled with difficulties. Dropping the example allows us to re-version Nozick's argument in a way that makes it far more forceful - and less dependent on people's often divergent intutions (...)
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  17.  77
    Alex Barber (2001). Idiolectal Error. Mind and Language 16 (3):263–283.
    A linguistic theory is correct exactly to the extent that it is the explicit statement of a body of knowledge possessed by a designated language-user. This popular psychological conception of the goal of linguistic theorizing is commonly paired with a preference for idiolectal over social languages, where it seems to be in the nature of idiolects that the beliefs one holds about one’s own are ipso facto correct. Unfortunately, it is also plausible that the correctness of a genuine belief cannot (...)
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  18.  83
    Alex Barber (2008). Idiolects. Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy.
    An idiolect, if there is such a thing, is a language that can be characterised exhaustively in terms of intrinsic properties of some single person at a time, a person whose idiolect it is at that time. The force of ‘intrinsic’ is that the characterisation ought not to turn on features of the person's wider linguistic community. Some think that this notion of an idiolect is unstable, and instead use ‘idiolect’ to describe a person's incomplete or erroneous grasp of their (...)
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  19. D. Barber (2006). Book Review: Kierkegaard's Ethic of Love: Divine Commands and Moral Obligations. [REVIEW] Studies in Christian Ethics 19 (2):244-247.
  20.  3
    Michael D. Barber (2001). Equality and Diversity: Phenomenological Investigations of Prejudice and Discrimination. Humanity Books.
  21. Michael D. Barber (2008). Autonomy, Reciprocity, and Responsibility: Darwall and Levinas on the Second Person. International Journal of Philosophical Studies 16 (5):629 – 644.
    Stephen Darwall's The Second-Person Standpoint converges with Emmanuel Levinas's concern about the role of the second-person relationship in ethics. This paper contrasts their methodologies (regressive analysis of presuppositions versus phenomenology) to explain Darwall's narrower view of ethical experience in terms of expressed reactive attitudes. It delineates Darwall's overall justificatory strategy and the centrality of autonomy and reciprocity within it, in contrast to Levinas's emphasis on the experience of responsibility. Asymmetrical responsibility plays a more foundational role as a critical counterpoint to (...)
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  22.  32
    Richard L. Barber (1957). The Special Significance of the History of Moral Philosophy. Tulane Studies in Philosophy 6:43-51.
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  23.  49
    G. Winston Barber (1980). Homocystinuria and the Passing of the One Gene— One Enzyme Concept of Disease. Journal of Medicine and Philosophy 5 (1):8-21.
  24.  48
    Richard L. Barber (1955). A Right to Believe. Tulane Studies in Philosophy 4:19-30.
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  25.  48
    Michael Barber (2006). Philosophy and Reflection: A Critique of Frank Welz's Sociological and “Processual” Criticism of Husserl and Schutz. [REVIEW] Human Studies 29 (2):141 - 157.
    Frank Welz’s Kritik der Lebenswelt undertakes a sociology of knowledge criticism of the work of Edmund Husserl and Alfred Schutz that construes them as developing absolutist, egological systems opposed to the “processual” worldview prominent since the modern rise of natural science. Welz, though, misunderstands the work of Schutz and Husserl and neglects how their focus on consciousness and eidetic features pertains to the kind of reflection that one must undertake if one would avoid succumbing to absolutism, that uncovers the presuppositions (...)
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  26.  47
    Richard L. Barber (1953). Experience, Reason and Faith. Tulane Studies in Philosophy 2:25-37.
  27.  18
    Veronika Wirtz, Alan Cribb & Nick Barber (2003). Understanding the Role of “the Hidden Curriculum” in Resource Allocation—The Case of the UK NHS. Health Care Analysis 11 (4):295-300.
    In this paper we want to briefly illustrate the ways in which technical, ethical and political judgements of various kinds are interwoven in the processes of healthcare decision-making in the UK. Drawing upon the research for the “Choices in Health Care” project we will borrow the notion of the hidden curriculum from education to illuminate the nature of resource allocation decision processes. In particular we will indicate some of the fundamental but largely hidden political factors in play in these processes (...)
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  28.  88
    Michael Barber (2009). Understanding, Self-Reflection, and Equality. Schutzian Research 1:273-291.
    This text includes the interventions of Alfred Schutz at the 1955 Conference on Science, Philosophy, and Religion, entitled “Aspects of Human Equality,” to which his paper, later published as “Equality and the Meaning Structure of the Social World,” had been submitted. In Schutz’s reactions to the comments of other conference participants, one can see his views on: the “secularization” of more theoretical philosophical and theological ideas, the need to distinguish levels of abstraction, the importance of self-reflection on one’s own viewpoint, (...)
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  29.  30
    Richard L. Barber (1976). Feibleman, Toynbee and The Future of Freedom. Tulane Studies in Philosophy 25:1-7.
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  30.  25
    G. L. Spaeth & G. W. Barber (1980). Homocystinuria and the Passing of the One Gene-- One Enzyme Concept of Disease. Journal of Medicine and Philosophy 5 (1):8-21.
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  31.  27
    Richard L. Barber (1954). Two Logics of Modality. Tulane Studies in Philosophy 3:41-54.
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  32.  31
    Michael D. Barber (2006). Phenomenology and Rigid Dualisms: Joachim Renn's Critique of Alfred Schutz. [REVIEW] Human Studies 29 (1):269 - 282.
    Joachim Renn argues that Schutz fails to integrate two fundamental strands in his work: phenomenology and pragmatism. Gaps between separated consciousnesses block synchronization and access to others, and objective symbol schemes, absorbed within the egological outlook, cannot bridge these gaps. Renn, however, construes phenomenology as practicing a solipsistic withdrawal of a self cut off from its environs, denies that contents correlative to individual intentional acts can be objective and common, and overlooks the intricacies of Schutz's descriptive methodology. Furthermore, for Renn, (...)
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  33. Alex Barber (ed.) (2003). Epistemology of Language. Oxford University Press.
    What must linguistic knowledge be like if it is to explain our capacity to use language? All linguists and philosophers of language presuppose some answer to this critical question, but all too often the presupposition is tacit. In this collection of sixteen previously unpublished essays, a distinguished international line-up of philosophers and linguists address a variety of interconnected themes concerning our knowledge of language.
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  34.  79
    Alex Barber (2006). Testimony and Illusion. Croatian Journal of Philosophy 6 (3):401-429.
    This paper considers a form of scepticism according to which sentences, along with other linguistic entities such as verbs and phonemes, etc., are never realized. If, whenever a conversational participant produces some noise or other, they and all other participants assume that a specific sentence has been realized (or, more colloquially, spoken), communication will be fluent whether or not the shared assumption is correct. That communication takes place is therefore, one might think, no ground for assuming that sentences are realized (...)
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  35.  5
    Geoffrey M. Lairumbi, Michael Parker, Raymond Fitzpatrick & English C. Mike (2011). Stakeholders Understanding of the Concept of Benefit Sharing in Health Research in Kenya: A Qualitative Study. BMC Medical Ethics 12 (1):20.
    BackgroundThe concept of benefit sharing to enhance the social value of global health research in resource poor settings is now a key strategy for addressing moral issues of relevance to individuals, communities and host countries in resource poor settings when they participate in international collaborative health research.The influence of benefit sharing framework on the conduct of collaborative health research is for instance evidenced by the number of publications and research ethics guidelines that require prior engagement between stakeholders to determine the (...)
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  36.  36
    Michael D. Barber (2004). A Moment of Unconditional Validity? Schutz and the Habermas/Rorty Debate. Human Studies 27 (1):51-67.
    Richard Rorty challenges Jurgen Habermas's belief that validity-claims raised within context-bound discussions contain a moment of universality validity. Rorty argues that immersion within contingent languages prohibits any neutral, context-independent ground, that one cannot predict the defense of one's assertions before any audience, and that philosophy can no more escape its contextual limitations than strategic counterparts. Alfred Schutz's phenomenological account of motivation, the reciprocity of perspectives, and the theoretical province of meaning can articulate Habermas's intuitions.Since any claim can be analyzed from (...)
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  37.  32
    Richard L. Barber (1956). Contingency, Causality and Common Sense. Tulane Studies in Philosophy 5:17-23.
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  38.  13
    Bernard Barber (1995). All Economies Are "Embedded": The Career of a Concept, and Beyond. Social Research 62.
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  39.  39
    Alex Barber (2011). Hedonism and the Experience Machine: Re-Reading of Robert Nozick,'The Experience Machine', in His Anarchy, State, and Utopia, New York: Basic Books, 1974, Pages 42–5. [REVIEW] Philosophical Papers 40 (2):257-278.
    Money isn’t everything, so what is? Many government leaders, social policy theorists, and members of the general public have a ready answer: happiness. This paper examines an opposing view due to Robert Nozick, which centres on his experience-machine thought experiment. Despite the example's influence among philosophers, the argument behind it is riddled with difficulties. Dropping the example allows us to re-version Nozick's argument in a way that makes it far more forceful - and less dependent on people's often divergent intutions (...)
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  40.  61
    Daniel Colucciello Barber (2011). The Power of Nothingness: Negative Thought in Agamben. Symposium: Canadian Journal of Continental Philosophy/Revue canadienne de philosophie continentale 15 (1):49-71.
    This paper addresses the nature and value of Giorgio Agamben’s negative thought, which revolves around the theme of nothingness. I begin by observing the validity of negative thinking, and thus oppose those affirmative philosophies that reject Agamben’s thought simply on the basis of its negativity. Indeed, the importance of negative thought is set forth by Agamben’s attention to the specific biopolitical logic that governs the present. If we are to understand the present, then we must begin by understanding the nothingness (...)
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  41.  29
    E. A. Barber (1929). Pamprepios von Panopolis. Eidyllion auf die Tageszeiten und Enkomion auf den Archon Theagenes von Athen nebst Bruchstticken anderer epischer Dichtungen und zwei Briefe des Gregorios von Nazianz im Pap. Gr. Vindob. 29788 A-C. Edited by Hans Gerstinger. Pp. 102; one plate. Vienna and Leipzig: Hölder - Pichler - Tempsky, 1928. M.5. [REVIEW] The Classical Review 43 (06):237-238.
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  42.  25
    Michael D. Barber (1991). Rationality, Relativism and the Human Sciences. Edited by J. Margolis Et Al. Modern Schoolman 68 (2):185-187.
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  43.  6
    Bernard Barber (1987). Trust in Science. Minerva 25 (1-2):123-134.
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  44.  35
    N. W. Barber (2004). Must Legalistic Conceptions of the Rule of Law Have a Social Dimension? Ratio Juris 17 (4):474-488.
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  45.  17
    Michael D. Barber (1996). Critique, Action, and Liberation. By James L. Marsh. Modern Schoolman 73 (2):189-191.
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  46.  59
    Alex Barber (1998). The Pleonasticity of Talk About Concepts. Philosophical Studies 89 (1):53-86.
    The paper aims to disarm arguments, prevalent in diverse philosophical contexts, that deny the legitimacy of attributions of propositional attitudes on the grounds that the putative subject lacks one or more of the requite concepts. Its strategy is to offer and defend an extremely minimal account on concept possession. The agenda of the paper broadens into a defence of the thesis that concepts are a linguistic epiphenomenon: talk about them emerges as the result of certain contingently available and pleonastic ways (...)
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  47.  46
    Richard L. Barber (1952). Universality and Meaning. Tulane Studies in Philosophy 1:43-70.
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  48.  15
    V. Wirtz, A. Cribb & N. Barber (2007). The Use of Informed Consent for Medication Treatment in Hospital: A Qualitative Study of the Views of Doctors and Nurses. Clinical Ethics 2 (1):36-41.
    The use of informed consent for surgery or research has been widely studied; however, its use in other areas of clinical practice has received less attention. This study investigates how doctors and nurses understand informed consent in relation to the prescription and administration of medicines in secondary care. It uses a qualitative analysis of semi-structured in-depth interviews with 19 doctors and 6 nurses recruited from various specialties in a teaching hospital. The results indicate a striking gap between official and actual (...)
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  49.  10
    Helen Allan & Debbie Barber (2005). Emotional Boundary Work in Advanced Fertility Nursing Roles. Nursing Ethics 12 (4):391-400.
    In this article we examine the nature of intimacy and knowing in the nurse-patient relationship in the context of advanced nursing roles in fertility care. We suggest that psychoanalytical approaches to emotions may contribute to an increased understanding of how emotions are managed in advanced nursing roles. These roles include nurses undertaking tasks that were formerly performed by doctors. Rather than limiting the potential for intimacy between nurses and fertility patients, we argue that such roles allow nurses to provide increased (...)
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  50.  15
    Melvin W. Barber (2006). Abandoned Communities: The Malignant Social Consequences of Modern Technology on Communities. Journal of Evolution and Technology 15 (1):37-50.
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