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Profile: Mike Martin (University College London)
  1. Mike W. Martin (forthcoming). Psychotherapy as Cultivating Character. Philosophy, Psychiatry, and Psychology 19 (1):37-39.
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  2. Mike W. Martin (2014). Love, Sex and Relationships. In Stan van Hooft & Nafsika Athanassoulis (eds.), The Handbook of Virtue Ethics. Acumen Publishing Ltd..
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  3. Mike W. Martin (2012). Happiness and the Good Life. OUP USA.
    What is happiness? How is it related to morality and virtue? Does living with illusion promote or diminish happiness? Is it better to pursue happiness with a partner than alone? Philosopher Mike W. Martin addresses these and other questions as he connects the meaning of happiness with the philosophical notion of "the good life." Defining happiness as loving one's life and valuing it in ways manifested by ample enjoyment and a deep sense of meaning, Martin explores the ways in which (...)
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  4. Mike W. Martin (2012). Of Mottos and Morals: Simple Words for Complex Virtues. Rowman & Littlefield Publishers.
    In Of Mottos and Morals: Simple Words for Complex Virtues, Martin explores the possibility that mottos themselves are worthy of serious thought, examining how they contribute to moral guidance and help us grapple with complexity.
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  5. Mike W. Martin (2011). Of Mottos and Morals. International Journal of Applied Philosophy 25 (1):49-60.
    At their best, mottos help us cope by crystallizing attitudes, eliciting resolve, and guiding conduct. Mottos have moral significance when they allude to the virtues and reflect the character of individuals and groups. As such, they function in the moral space between abstract ethical theory and contextual moral judgment. I discuss personal mottos such as those of Isak Dinesen (“I will answer”) and group mottos such as found in social movements (“Think globally, act locally”), professions (“Above all, do no harm”), (...)
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  6. Kevin Aho, Robert Audi, Peter A. French, Al Gini, Charles Guignon, Annette Holba, Marcia Homiak, Mike W. Martin & Valerie Tiberius (2010). The Value of Time and Leisure in a World of Work. Lexington Books.
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  7. Mike W. Martin (2010). Personality Disorders and Moral Responsibility. Philosophy, Psychiatry, and Psychology 17 (2):127-129.
    In “Personality Disorders: Moral or Medical Kinds—or Both?” Peter Zachar and Nancy Nyquist Potter (2010) reject any general dichotomy between morality and mental health, and specifically between character vices and personality disorders. In doing so, they provide a nuanced and illuminating discussion that connects Aristotelian virtue ethics to a multidimensional understanding of personality disorders. I share their conviction that dissolving morality–health dichotomies is the starting point for any plausible understanding of human beings (Martin 2006), but I register some qualms about (...)
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  8. Mike W. Martin (2009). Happily Self-Deceived. Social Theory and Practice 35 (1):29-44.
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  9. Mike W. Martin (2009). Suffering in Happy Lives. In Lisa Bortolotti (ed.), Philosophy and Happiness. Palgrave Macmillan. 100--115.
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  10. Mike W. Martin (2009). Truth and Healing a Veteran's Depression. Philosophy, Psychiatry, and Psychology 16 (3):229-231.
  11. Mike W. Martin (2007). Creativity: Ethics and Excellence in Science. Lexington Books.
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  12. Mike W. Martin (2007). Happiness and Virtue in Positive Psychology. Journal for the Theory of Social Behaviour 37 (1):89–103.
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  13. Mike W. Martin (2007). Happiness, Virtue, and Truth in Cohen's Logic-Based Therapy. International Journal of Applied Philosophy 21 (1):129-133.
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  14. Mike W. Martin (2006). From Morality to Mental Health: Virtue and Vice in a Therapeutic Culture. OUP USA.
    Morality and mental health are now inseparably linked in our view of character. Alcoholics are sick, yet they are punished for drunk driving. Drug addicts are criminals, but their punishment can be court ordered therapy. The line between character flaws and personality disorders has become fuzzy, with even the seven deadly sins seen as mental disorders. In addition to pathologizing wrong-doing, we also psychologize virtue; self-respect becomes self-esteem, integrity becomes psychological integration, and responsibility becomes maturity. Moral advice is now sought (...)
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  15. Mike W. Martin (2006). Moral Creativity in Science and Engineering. Science and Engineering Ethics 12 (3):421-433.
    Creativity in science and engineering has moral significance and deserves attention within professional ethics, in at least three areas. First, much scientific and technological creativity constitutes moral creativity because it generates moral benefits, is motivated by moral concern, and manifests virtues such as beneficence, courage, and perseverance. Second, creativity contributes to the meaning that scientists and engineers derive from their work, thereby connecting with virtues such as authenticity and also faults arising from Faustian trade-offs. Third, morally creative leadership is important (...)
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  16. Mike W. Martin (2006). Moral Creativity. International Journal of Applied Philosophy 20 (1):55-66.
    Moral creativity consists in identifying, interpreting, and implementing moral values in ways that bring about new and morally valuable results, often in response to an unprecedented situation. It does not mean inventing values subjectively, as Sartre and Nietzsche suggested. Moral creativity plays a significant role in meeting role responsibilities, exercising leadership, developing social policies, and living authentically in light of moral ideals. Kenneth R. Feinberg’s service in compensating the victims of 9/11 provides a paradigm instance.
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  17. Mike W. Martin (2005). Paradoxes of Moral Motivation. Journal of Value Inquiry 39 (3-4):299-308.
    In suggesting that “philanthropy is almost the only virtuewhich is sufficiently appreciated by mankind,” Thoreau did not wish to denigrate charity, but he took offense when even minor Christian leaders were ranked above Newton, Shakespeare, and other creative individuals “who by their lives and works are a blessing to mankind.”1 Such individuals might be motivated primarily by caring for nonmoral goods, such as scientific truth, aesthetic appreciation, or creative achievement. Yet, paradoxically, they often benefit humanity far more than they could (...)
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  18. Haavard Koppang & Mike W. Martin (2004). On Moralizing in Business Ethics. Business and Professional Ethics Journal 23 (3):107-114.
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  19. Mike W. Martin (2004). On Moralizing in Business Ethics. Business and Professional Ethics Journal 23 (3):107-114.
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  20. Mike W. Martin (2002). Meaningful Work and Professional Ethics. Professional Ethics, a Multidisciplinary Journal 10 (1):89-100.
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  21. Mike W. Martin (2002). Personal Meaning and Ethics in Engineering. Science and Engineering Ethics 8 (4):545-560.
    The study of engineering ethics tends to emphasize professional codes of ethics and, to lesser degrees, business ethics and technology studies. These are all important vantage points, but they neglect personal moral commitments, as well as personal aesthetic, religious, and other values that are not mandatory for all members of engineering. This paper illustrates how personal moral commitments motivate, guide, and give meaning to the work of engineers, contributing to both self-fulfillment and public goods. It also explores some general frameworks (...)
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  22. Mike W. Martin (2002). Provoking Thoughts on Professionalism. International Journal of Applied Philosophy 16 (2):279-283.
    In this book, Michael Davis, one of the most insightful writers on professional ethics, substantially revises and integrates fifteen of his previously published articles, making them available to a wider audience. Several professions are emphasized: law, engineering, and police work (including international law enforcement). Yet the topics discussed have relevance to all areas of professional ethics: defining professions, the moral authority of professional codes, intelligently interpreting codes, professional autonomy and discretion, dirty hands, and goals in teaching professional ethics.
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  23. Mike W. Martin (2002). On the Evolution of Depression. Philosophy, Psychiatry, and Psychology 9 (3):255-259.
  24. Mike W. Martin (2001). Responsibility for Health and Blaming Victims. Journal of Medical Humanities 22 (2):95-114.
    If we are responsible for taking care of our health, are we blameworthy when we become sick because we failed to meet that responsibility? Or is it immoral to blame the victim of sickness? A moral perspective that is sensitive to therapeutic concerns will downplay blame, but banishing all blame is neither feasible nor desirable. We need to understand the ambiguities surrounding moral responsibility in four contexts: (1) preventing sickness, (2) assigning financial liabilities for health care costs, (3) giving meaning (...)
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  25. Mike W. Martin & Donald L. Gabard (2001). Conflict of Interest and Physical Therapy. In Michael Davis & Andrew Stark (eds.), Conflict of Interest in the Professions. Oxford University Press. 314--332.
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  26. Mike W. Martin (2000). Meaningful Work: Rethinking Professional Ethics. Oxford University Press.
    As commonly understood, professional ethics consists of shared duties and episodic dilemmas--the responsibilities incumbent on all members of specific professions joined together with the dilemmas that arise when these responsibilities conflict. Martin challenges this "consensus paradigm" as he rethinks professional ethics to include personal commitments and ideals, of which many are not mandatory. Using specific examples from a wide range of professions, including medicine, law, high school teaching, journalism, engineering, and ministry, he explores how personal commitments motivate, guide, and give (...)
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  27. Mike W. Martin (1999). Alcoholism as Sickness and Wrongdoing. Journal for the Theory of Social Behaviour 29 (2):109–131.
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  28. Mike W. Martin (1999). Depression and Moral Health: A Response to the Commentary. Philosophy, Psychiatry, and Psychology 6 (4):295-298.
  29. Mike W. Martin (1999). Depression: Illness, Insight, and Identity. Philosophy, Psychiatry, and Psychology 6 (4):271-286.
  30. Mike W. Martin (1999). Explaining Wrongdoing in Professions. Journal of Social Philosophy 30 (2):236–250.
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  31. Mike W. Martin (1999). Good Fortune Obligates: Gratitude, Philanthropy, and Colonialism. Southern Journal of Philosophy 37 (1):57-75.
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  32. Mike W. Martin (1997). Advocating Values. Teaching Philosophy 20 (1):19-34.
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  33. Mike W. Martin (1997). Caring About Clients. Professional Ethics 6 (1/2):55-75.
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  34. Mike W. Martin (1997). Professional Distance. International Journal of Applied Philosophy 11 (2):39-50.
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  35. Mike W. Martin (1997). Self-Deceiving Intentions. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 20 (1):122-123.
    Contrary to Mele's suggestion, not all garden-variety self-deception reduces to bias-generated false beliefs (usually held contrary to the evidence). Many cases center around self-deceiving intentions to avoid painful topics, escape unpleasant truths, seek comfortable attitudes, and evade self-acknowledgment. These intentions do not imply paradoxical projects or contradictory belief states.
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  36. Mike W. Martin (1996). Personal Ideals in Professional Ethics. Professional Ethics 5 (1/2):3-27.
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  37. Mike W. Martin (1994). Religion Ethics and Professionalism. Professional Ethics, a Multidisciplinary Journal 3 (2):17-35.
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  38. Mike W. Martin (1994). Teaching Philanthropy Ethics. Teaching Philosophy 17 (3):245-260.
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  39. Mike W. Martin (1994). Adultery and Fidelity. Journal of Social Philosophy 25 (3):76-91.
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  40. Mike W. Martin (1993). Honesty in Love. Journal of Value Inquiry 27 (3-4):497-507.
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  41. Mike W. Martin (1993). Kevin R. Murphy, Honesty in the Workplace Reviewed By. Philosophy in Review 13 (5):251-252.
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  42. Mike W. Martin (1993). Rethinking Reverence for Life. Between the Species 9 (4):6.
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  43. Mike W. Martin (1993). What's Fair in Love? Southern Journal of Philosophy 31 (4):393-407.
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  44. Mike W. Martin (1993). Love's Constancy. Philosophy 68 (263):63 - 77.
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  45. Mike W. Martin (1992). Whistleblowing: Professionalism, Personal Life, and Shared Responsibility for Safety in Engineering. Business and Professional Ethics Journal 11 (2):21-40.
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  46. Mike W. Martin (1992). Rationalization and Responsibility: A Reply to Whisner. Journal of Social Philosophy 23 (2):176-184.
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  47. Mike W. Martin (1988). John King-Farlow and Sean O'Connell, Self-Conflict and Self Healing Reviewed By. Philosophy in Review 8 (6):223-225.
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  48. Mike W. Martin (1986). Terence Penelhum, Butler (The Arguments of the Philosophers) Reviewed By. Philosophy in Review 6 (10):521-524.
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  49. Mike W. Martin (1984). Demystifying Doublethink. Social Theory and Practice 10 (3):319-331.
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  50. Mike W. Martin (1983). Applied and General Ethics. Bowling Green Studies in Applied Philosophy 5:34-44.
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