25 found
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  1.  1
    Maureen Kelley, Cyan James, Stephanie Alessi Kraft, Diane Korngiebel, Isabelle Wijangco, Emily Rosenthal, Steven Joffe, Mildred K. Cho, Benjamin Wilfond & Sandra Soo-Jin Lee (2015). Patient Perspectives on the Learning Health System: The Importance of Trust and Shared Decision Making. American Journal of Bioethics 15 (9):4-17.
    We conducted focus groups to assess patient attitudes toward research on medical practices in the context of usual care. We found that patients focus on the implications of this research for their relationship with and trust in their physicians. Patients view research on medical practices as separate from usual care, demanding dissemination of information and in most cases, individual consent. Patients expect information about this research to come through their physician, whom they rely on to identify and filter associated risks. (...)
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  2.  5
    Susan M. Wolf, Frances P. Lawrenz, Charles A. Nelson, Jeffrey P. Kahn, Mildred K. Cho, Ellen Wright Clayton, Joel G. Fletcher, Michael K. Georgieff, Dale Hammerschmidt, Kathy Hudson, Judy Illes, Vivek Kapur, Moira A. Keane, Barbara A. Koenig, Bonnie S. LeRoy, Elizabeth G. McFarland, Jordan Paradise, Lisa S. Parker, Sharon F. Terry, Brian van Ness & Benjamin S. Wilfond (2008). Managing Incidental Findings in Human Subjects Research: Analysis and Recommendations. Journal of Law, Medicine & Ethics 36 (2):219-248.
    No consensus yet exists on how to handle incidental fnd-ings in human subjects research. Yet empirical studies document IFs in a wide range of research studies, where IFs are fndings beyond the aims of the study that are of potential health or reproductive importance to the individual research participant. This paper reports recommendations of a two-year project group funded by NIH to study how to manage IFs in genetic and genomic research, as well as imaging research. We conclude that researchers (...)
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  3.  10
    Pamela L. Sankar & Mildred K. Cho (2015). Engineering Values Into Genetic Engineering: A Proposed Analytic Framework for Scientific Social Responsibility. American Journal of Bioethics 15 (12):18-24.
    Recent experiments have been used to “edit” genomes of various plant, animal and other species, including humans, with unprecedented precision. Furthermore, editing the Cas9 endonuclease gene with a gene encoding the desired guide RNA into an organism, adjacent to an altered gene, could create a “gene drive” that could spread a trait through an entire population of organisms. These experiments represent advances along a spectrum of technological abilities that genetic engineers have been working on since the advent of recombinant DNA (...)
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  4.  12
    Henry T. Greely, Mildred K. Cho, Linda F. Hogle & Debra M. Satz (2007). Thinking About the Human Neuron Mouse. American Journal of Bioethics 7 (5):27 – 40.
  5. Susan M. Wolf, Frances P. Lawrenz, Charles A. Nelson, Jeffrey P. Kahn, Mildred K. Cho, Ellen Wright Clayton, Joel G. Fletcher, Michael K. Georgieff, Dale Hammerschmidt, Kathy Hudson, Judy Illes, Vivek Kapur, Moira A. Keane, Barbara A. Koenig, Bonnie S. LeRoy, Elizabeth G. McFarland, Jordan Paradise, Lisa S. Parker, Sharon F. Terry, Brian Van Ness & Benjamin S. Wilfond (2008). Managing Incidental Findings in Human Subjects Research: Analysis and Recommendations. Journal of Law, Medicine and Ethics 36 (2):219-248.
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  6.  6
    Megan Allyse, Lauren Carter Sayres, Taylor Goodspeed, Marsha Michie & Mildred K. Cho (2015). “Don't Want No Risk and Don't Want No Problems”: Public Understandings of the Risks and Benefits of Noninvasive Prenatal Testing in the United States. Ajob Empirical Bioethics 6 (1):5-20.
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  7.  8
    Mildred K. Cho (2006). Racial and Ethnic Categories in Biomedical Research: There is No Baby in the Bathwater. Journal of Law, Medicine & Ethics 34 (3):497-499.
    The use of racial categories in biomedicine has had a long history in the United States. However, social hierarchy and discrimination, justified by purported scientific differences, has also plagued the history of racial categories. Because “race” has some correlation with biological and genetic characteristics, there has been a call not to “throw the baby out with the bathwater” by eliminating race as a research or clinical category. I argue that race is too undefined and fluid to be useful as a (...)
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  8.  6
    Mildred K. Cho (2008). Understanding Incidental Findings in the Context of Genetics and Genomics. Journal of Law, Medicine & Ethics 36 (2):280-285.
    Human genetic and genomic research can yield information that may be of clinical relevance to the individuals who participate as subjects of the research. It has been common practice among researchers to notify participants during the informed consent process that no individual results will be disclosed, “incidental” or otherwise. However, as genetic information obtained in research becomes orders of magnitude more voluminous, increasingly accessible online, and more informative, this precedent may no longer be appropriate. There is not yet consensus on (...)
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  9.  12
    Mildred K. Cho, Sara L. Tobin, Henry T. Greely, Jennifer McCormick, Angie Boyce & David Magnus (2008). Strangers at the Benchside: Research Ethics Consultation. American Journal of Bioethics 8 (3):4 – 13.
    Institutional ethics consultation services for biomedical scientists have begun to proliferate, especially for clinical researchers. We discuss several models of ethics consultation and describe a team-based approach used at Stanford University in the context of these models. As research ethics consultation services expand, there are many unresolved questions that need to be addressed, including what the scope, composition, and purpose of such services should be, whether core competencies for consultants can and should be defined, and how conflicts of interest should (...)
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  10. Mildred K. Cho (2008). Understanding Incidental Findings in the Context of Genetics and Genomics. Journal of Law, Medicine and Ethics 36 (2):280-285.
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  11.  1
    Mildred K. Cho (2006). Racial and Ethnic Categories in Biomedical Research: There is No Baby in the Bathwater. Journal of Law, Medicine and Ethics 34 (3):497-499.
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  12.  1
    Hayden Harvey, Molly Havard, David Magnus, Mildred K. Cho & Ingmar H. Riedel-Kruse (2014). Innocent Fun or “Microslavery”? Hastings Center Report 44 (6):38-46.
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  13.  9
    Henry T. Greely, Mildred K. Cho, Linda F. Hogle & Debra M. Satz (2007). Response to Open Peer Commentaries on "Thinking About the Human Neuron Mouse". American Journal of Bioethics 7 (5):W4 – W6.
  14.  7
    David Magnus & Mildred K. Cho (2006). A Commentary on Oocyte Donation for Stem Cell Research in South Korea. American Journal of Bioethics 6 (1):W23-W24.
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  15.  8
    Michelle R. Henry, Mildred K. Cho, Meredith A. Weaver & Jon F. Merz (2003). A Pilot Survey on the Licensing of DNA Inventions. Journal of Law, Medicine & Ethics 31 (3):442-449.
  16.  4
    Lauren C. Milner & Mildred K. Cho (2014). Focusing on Cause or Cure? Priorities and Stakeholder Presence in Childhood Psychiatry Research. Ajob Empirical Bioethics 5 (1):44-55.
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  17.  3
    Jon F. Merz & Mildred K. Cho (1998). Disease Genes Are Not Patentable: A Rebuttal of McGee. Cambridge Quarterly of Healthcare Ethics 7 (4):425-428.
    Dr. McGee presents a cogent argument for the patentability of the diagnosis of gene forms that are found to be associated with disease or other phenotypic manifestations. We're convinced he's wrong. An analogy will help explain why.
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  18.  1
    Maureen Kelley, Cyan James, Stephanie Alessi Kraft, Diane Korngiebel, Isabelle Wijangco, Steven Joffe, Mildred K. Cho, Benjamin Wilfond & Sandra Soo-Jin Lee (2016). The Role of Patient Perspectives in Clinical Research Ethics and Policy: Response to Open Peer Commentaries on “Patient Perspectives on the Learning Health System”. American Journal of Bioethics 16 (2):7-9.
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  19.  4
    Pamela Sankar, Mildred K. Cho, Keri Monahan & Kamila Nowak (2015). Reporting Race and Ethnicity in Genetics Research: Do Journal Recommendations or Resources Matter? Science and Engineering Ethics 21 (5):1353-1366.
    Appeals to scrutinize the use of race and ethnicity as variables in genetics research notwithstanding, these variables continue to be inadequately explained and inconsistently used in research publications. In previous research, we found that published genetic research fails to follow suggestions offered for addressing this problem, such as explaining the basis on which these labels are assigned to populations. This study, an analysis of genetic research articles using race or ethnicity terms, explores possible features of journals that are associated with (...)
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  20.  2
    Mildred K. Cho (2015). Preventive Genomic Sequencing in the General Population: Do PGS Fly? American Journal of Bioethics 15 (7):1-2.
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  21.  2
    Arthur L. Caplan, Thomas A. Cavanaugh, Mildred K. Cho, Steve Heilig, John Hubert, Kenneth V. Iserson, Tom Koch & Mark G. Kuczewski (1998). David Buehler, M. Div., MA, is Founder of Bioethika Online Publishers and Also Serves as Chaplain to the University Lutheran Ministry of Providence, Rhode Island. Michael M. Burgess, Ph. D., is Chair in Biomedical Ethics, Centre for Applied Ethics at The University of British Columbia, Vancouver, Canada. [REVIEW] Cambridge Quarterly of Healthcare Ethics 7:335-336.
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  22.  2
    Mildred K. Cho (2014). Ethics and Empiricism in the Formation of Professional Guidelines. American Journal of Bioethics 14 (3):1-2.
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  23.  1
    Mildred K. Cho (1993). Are Clinical Trials of Cell Transplantation for Duchenne Muscular Dystrophy Ethical? IRB: Ethics & Human Research 16 (1-2):12-15.
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  24. Mildred K. Cho (2014). Open-Label Extension Studies: Are They Really Research? American Journal of Bioethics 14 (3):1-2.
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  25. Michelle R. Henry, Mildred K. Cho, Meredith A. Weaver & Jon F. Merz (2003). A Pilot Survey on the Licensing of DNA Inventions. Journal of Law, Medicine and Ethics 31 (3):442-449.
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