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  1. Miles Little (2014). Perhaps Medicine Is One of the Humanities? Journal of Bioethical Inquiry 11 (2):265-266.
    Why on earth should literary skills, or even a love of literature, make for a better doctor? Gribble (1992) has argued that encouraging literary critical skills sharpens those specific skills but has no benefits that flow into other cognitive areas. Nussbaum (1995), per contra, has claimed that literature does indeed allow imaginative participation in situations that are ethically challenging and therefore encourages the development of phronesis, or practical wisdom. Robin Downie (1994) taught an immensely popular course on medicine and the (...)
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  2. Kimberly Strong, Ian Kerridge & Miles Little (2014). Savior Siblings, Parenting and the Moral Valorization of Children. Bioethics 28 (4):187-193.
    Philosophy has long been concerned with ‘moral status’. Discussions about the moral status of children, however, seem often to promote confusion rather than clarity. Using the creation of ‘savior siblings’ as an example, this paper provides a philosophical critique of the moral status of children and the moral relevance of parenting and the role that formative experience, regret and relational autonomy play in parental decisions. We suggest that parents make moral decisions that are guided by the moral significance they attach (...)
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  3. Narcyz Ghinea, Wendy Lipworth, Miles Little, Ian Kerridge & Richard Day (2013). Overcoming Entrenched Disagreements: The Case of Misoprostol for Post‐Partum Haemorrhage. Developing World Bioethics 14 (3).
    The debate about whether misoprostol should be distributed to low resource communities to prevent post-partum haemorrhage (PPH), recognised as a major cause of maternal mortality, is deeply polarised. This is in spite of stakeholders having access to the same evidence about the risks and benefits of misoprostol. To understand the disagreement, we conducted a qualitative analysis of the values underpinning debates surrounding community distribution of misoprostol. We found that different moral priorities, epistemic values, and attitudes towards uncertainty were the main (...)
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  4. Wendy Lipworth, Miles Little, Pippa Markham, Jill Gordon & Ian Kerridge (2013). Doctors on Status and Respect: A Qualitative Study. [REVIEW] Journal of Bioethical Inquiry 10 (2):205-217.
    While doctors generally enjoy considerable status, some believe that this is increasingly threatened by consumerism, managerialism, and competition from other health professions. Research into doctors’ perceptions of the changes occurring in medicine has provided some insights into how they perceive and respond to these changes but has generally failed to distinguish clearly between concerns about “status,” related to the entitlements associated with one’s position in a social hierarchy, and concerns about “respect,” related to being held in high regard for one’s (...)
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  5. Wendy Lipworth, Kathleen Montgomery & Miles Little (2013). How Pharmaceutical Industry Employees Manage Competing Commitments in the Face of Public Criticism. Journal of Bioethical Inquiry 10 (3):355-367.
    The pharmaceutical industry has been criticised for pervasive misconduct. These concerns have generally resulted in increasing regulation. While such regulation is no doubt necessary, it tends to assume that everyone working for pharmaceutical companies is equally motivated by commerce, without much understanding of the specific views and experiences of those who work in different parts of the industry. In order to gain a more nuanced picture of the work that goes on in the “medical affairs” departments of pharmaceutical companies, we (...)
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  6. Miles Little (2013). A Better Grounding for Person-Centered Medicine? American Journal of Bioethics 13 (8):40-42.
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  7. Miles Little (2013). Ex Nihilo Nihil Fit? Medicine Rests on Solid Foundations. Journal of Evaluation in Clinical Practice 19 (3):467-470.
    There seem to be some misunderstandings abroad in the literature about medical epistemology and person-centered medicine concerning the nature of 'modest' or aetiological foundationalism, and some vagueness about 'emergence'. This paper urges a greater tolerance for a modest, Humean variety of foundationalism, not least because it seems to offer significant support for person-centred medicine. It also suggests a closer examination of emergence as an explanation or justification for medicine, since emergence is a complex concept that does nothing to rule out (...)
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  8. Miles Little (2013). In Memory of Gavin Mooney. Journal of Bioethical Inquiry 10 (2):133-134.
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  9. Wendy Lipworth, Ian Kerridge, Miles Little, Jill Gordon & Pippa Markham (2012). Meaning and Value in Medical School Curricula. Journal of Evaluation in Clinical Practice 18 (5):1027-1035.
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  10. Miles Little, Wendy Lipworth, Jill Gordon, Pippa Markham & Ian Kerridge (2012). Values‐Based Medicine and Modest Foundationalism. Journal of Evaluation in Clinical Practice 18 (5):1020-1026.
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  11. Wendy Lipworth, Ian Kerridge, Stacy Carter & Miles Little (2011). Should Biomedical Publishing Be “Opened Up”? Toward a Values-Based Peer-Review Process. Journal of Bioethical Inquiry 8 (3):267-280.
    Peer review of manuscripts for biomedical journals has become a subject of intense ethical debate. One of the most contentious issues is whether or not peer review should be anonymous. This study aimed to generate a rich, empirically-grounded understanding of the values held by journal editors and peer reviewers with a view to informing journal policy. Qualitative methods were used to carry out an inductive analysis of biomedical reviewers’ and editors’ values. Data was derived from in-depth, open-ended interviews with journal (...)
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  12. Miles Little, Jill Gordon, Pippa Markham, Lucie Rychetnik & Ian Kerridge (2011). Virtuous Acts as Practical Medical Ethics: An Empirical Study. Journal of Evaluation in Clinical Practice 17 (5):948-953.
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  13. Miles Little (2009). The Role of Regret in Informed Consent. Journal of Bioethical Inquiry 6 (1):49-59.
    Informed consent to medical procedures tends to be construed in terms of principle-based ethics and one or other form of expected utility theory. These constructions leave problems created by imperfect communication; subjective distress and other emotions; imperfect knowledge and incomplete understanding; complexity, and previous experience or the lack of it. There is evidence that people giving consent to therapy or to research participation act intuitively and assess consequences holistically, being influenced more by the magnitude of outcomes than their probability. People (...)
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  14. Miles Little (2002). The Fivefold Root of an Ethics of Surgery. Bioethics 16 (3):183–201.
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  15. Miles Little (2000). Conflict of Interests, Vested Interests and Health Research. Journal of Evaluation in Clinical Practice 6 (4):413-420.
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  16. Miles Little, Christopher F. C. Jordens, Kim Paul, Emma Sayers & Dhananjayan Sriskandarajah (2000). Face, Honor and Dignity in the Context of Colon Cancer. Journal of Medical Humanities 21 (4):229-243.
    Illness narratives from patients with colorectal cancer commonly record patterns of change in social relationships that follow the diagnosis and treatment of the condition. We believe that these changes are best explained as a process of facework, which reflects losses of face on the part of the patient, and which assists in the creation of new faces that convey new senses of identity. Facework is familiar in the work by E. Goffman (1955) and has been extensively reworked since his time. (...)
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  17. Miles Little (1999). Assisted Suicide, Suffering and the Meaning of a Life. Theoretical Medicine and Bioethics 20 (3):287-298.
    The ethical problems surrounding voluntary assisted suicide remain formidable, and are unlikely to be resolved in pluralist societies. An examination of historical attitudes to suicide suggests that modernity has inherited a formidable complex of religious and moral attitudes to suicide, whether assisted or not. Advocates usually invoke the ending of intolerable suffering as one justification for euthanasia of this kind. This does not provide an adequate justification by itself, because there are (at least theoretically) methods which would relieve suffering without (...)
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  18. Carole Ulanowsky, Miles Little, Andrew Grubb, Maxwell J. Mehlman, Lennart Nordenfelt, David Lamb & Becky Cox White (1997). Тип: Статья в журнале-научная статья язык: Английский том: 11 номер: 1 год: 1997 страницы: 75-89 цит. В ринц®: 0. Bioethics 11 (1):75-89.
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