Search results for 'Milton Kramer' (try it on Scholar)

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  1. Milton Kramer (2000). Dreaming has Content and Meaning Not Just Form. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 23 (6):959-961.score: 240.0
    The biological theories of dreaming provide no explanation for the transduction from neuronal discharge to dreaming or waking consciousness. They cannot account for the variability in dream content between individuals or within individuals. Mind-brain isomorphism is poorly supported, as is dreaming's link to REM sleep. Biological theories of dreaming do not provide a function for dreaming nor a meaning for dreams. Evolutionary views of dreaming do not relate dream content to the current concerns of the dreamer and using the nightmare (...)
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  2. Dagmar Mirbach & Hans Joachim Krämer (eds.) (2009). Hermeneutik Und Geschichte der Philosophie: Festschrift für Hans Krämer Zum 80. Geburtstag. Olms.score: 180.0
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  3. Matthew H. Kramer (1997). John Locke and the Origins of Private Property: Philosophical Explorations of Individualism, Community, and Equality. Cambridge University Press.score: 60.0
    John Locke's labor theory of property is one of the seminal ideas of political philosophy and served to establish its author's reputation as one of the leading social and political thinkers of all time. Through it Locke addressed many of his most pressing concerns, and earned a reputation as an outstanding spokesman for political individualism - a reputation that lingers widely despite some partial challenges that have been raised in recent years. In this major new study Matthew Kramer offers (...)
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  4. Matthew H. Kramer (2007). Objectivity and the Rule of Law. Cambridge University Press.score: 60.0
    What is objectivity? What is the rule of law? Are the operations of legal systems objective? If so, in what ways and to what degrees are they objective? Does anything of importance depend on the objectivity of law? These are some of the principal questions addressed by Matthew H. Kramer in this lucid and wide-ranging study that introduces readers to vital areas of philosophical enquiry.
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  5. Matthew H. Kramer (1999). In Defense of Legal Positivism: Law Without Trimmings. Oxford University Press.score: 60.0
    This book is an uncompromising defense of legal positivism that insists on the separability of law and morality. After distinguishing among three facets of morality, Kramer explores a variety of ways in which law has been perceived as integrally connected to each of those facets. The book concludes with a detailed discussion of the obligation to obey the law--a discussion that highlights the strengths of legal positivism in the domain of political philosophy as much as in the domain of (...)
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  6. Matthew H. Kramer (2009). Moral Realism as a Moral Doctrine. Wiley-Blackwell.score: 60.0
    In this major new book, Matthew Kramer seeks to establish two main conclusions.
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  7. Eric Mark Kramer (1997). Modern/Postmodern: Off the Beaten Path of Antimodernism. Praeger.score: 60.0
    In this book Eric Kramer introduces his theory of dimensional accrual/dissociation to explain the difference between modernity and postmodernity..
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  8. Matthew H. Kramer (2008). The Quality of Freedom. OUP Oxford.score: 60.0
    At least since the publication of Isaiah Berlin's famous essay "Two Concepts of Liberty" nearly half a century ago, political philosophers have argued vigorously over the relative merits of "positive" and "negative" accounts of freedom. Matthew Kramer writes squarely within the negative-liberty tradition, but he incorporates a number of ideas that are quite often associated with theories of positive liberty. Much of The Quality of Freedom is devoted to elaborating the necessary and sufficient conditions for the existence of particular (...)
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  9. Matthew H. Kramer (2008). Where Law and Morality Meet. Oxford University Press.score: 60.0
    How are law and morality connected, how do they interact, and in what ways are they distinct? In Part I of this book, Matthew Kramer argues that moral principles can enter into the law of any jurisdiction. He contends that legal officials can invoke moral principles as laws for resolving disputes, and that they can also invoke them as threshold tests which ordinary laws must satisfy. In opposition to many other theorists, Kramer argues that these functions of moral (...)
     
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  10. Matthew H. Kramer (2001). Dogmas and Distortions: Legal Positivism Defended. Oxford Journal of Legal Studies 21 (4):673-701.score: 60.0
    In a recent full‐length review of Matthew Kramer's In Defense of Legal Positivism, David Dyzenhaus has attacked legal positivists' accounts of adjudication and their views of the relationship between law and morality. The present essay defends legal positivism against his strictures, by arguing that he has misunderstood specific texts and the general lines of enquiry which the positivists pursue.
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  11. Matthew H. Kramer (2011). The Ethics of Capital Punishment: A Philosophical Investigation of Evil and its Consequences. OUP Oxford.score: 60.0
    Debate has long been waged over the morality of capital punishment, with standard arguments in its favour being marshalled against familiar arguments that oppose the practice. In The Ethics of Capital Punishment, Matthew Kramer takes a fresh look at the philosophical arguments on which the legitimacy of the death penalty stands or falls, and he develops a novel justification of that penalty for a limited range of cases. -/- The book pursues both a project of critical debunking of the (...)
     
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  12. J. R. Milton & Philip Milton (eds.) (2010). John Locke: An Essay Concerning Toleration: And Other Writings on Law and Politics, 1667-1683. OUP Oxford.score: 60.0
    J. R. and Philip Milton present the first critical edition of John Locke's Essay concerning Toleration and a number of other writings on law and politics composed between 1667 and 1683. Although Locke never published any of these works himself they are of very great interest for students of his intellectual development because they are markedly different from the early works he wrote while at Oxford and show him working out ideas that were to appear in his mature political (...)
     
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  13. John Milton (1991). Political Writings. Cambridge University Press.score: 60.0
    John Milton was not only the greatest English Renaissance poet but also devoted twenty years to prose writing in the advancement of religious, civil and political liberties. The height of his public career was as chief propagandist to the Commonwealth regime which came into being following the execution of King Charles I in 1649. The first of the two complete texts in this volume, The Tenure of Kings and Magistrates, was easily the most radical justification of the regicide at (...)
     
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  14. Chris A. Kramer (2012). As If: Connecting Phenomenology, Mirror Neurons, Empathy, and Laughter. Phaenex 7 (1):275-308.score: 30.0
    The discovery of mirror neurons in both primates and humans has led to an enormous amount of research and speculation as to how conscious beings are able to interact so effortlessly among one another. Mirror neurons might provide an embodied basis for passive synthesis and the eventual process of further communalization through empathy, as envisioned by Edmund Husserl. I consider the possibility of a phenomenological and scientific investigation of laughter as a point of connection that might in the future bridge (...)
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  15. Matthew H. Kramer (2013). In Defense of Hart. In Wil Waluchow & Stefan Sciaraffa (eds.), Philosophical Foundations of the Nature of Law. Oup Oxford. 22.score: 30.0
    In Legality Scott Shapiro seeks to provide the motivation for the development of his own elaborate account of law by undertaking a critique of H.L.A. Hart's jurisprudential theory. Hart maintained that every legal system is underlain by a rule of recognition through which officials of the system identify the norms that belong to the system as laws. Shapiro argues that Hart's remarks on the rule of recognition are confused and that his model of lawis consequently untenable. Shapiro contends that a (...)
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  16. Matthew H. Kramer (2005). Moral Rights and the Limits of the Ought-Implies-Can Principle: Why Impeccable Precautions Are No Excuse. Inquiry 48 (4):307 – 355.score: 30.0
    This essay argues against the commonly held view that "ought" implies "can" in the domain of morality. More specifically, I contest the notion that nobody should ever be held morally responsible for failing to avoid the infliction of any harm that he or she has not been able to avoid through all reasonably feasible precautions in the carrying out of some worthwhile activity. The article explicates the concept of a moral right in order to show why violations of moral rights (...)
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  17. Juli B. Kramer (2006). Ethical Analysis and Recommended Action in Response to the Dangers Associated with Youth Consumerism. Ethics and Behavior 16 (4):291 – 303.score: 30.0
    Research shows that a culture of consumerism and materialism has a dramatic and negative impact on children's physical and psychological health. Psychologists have a duty to act to reverse this trend. Information on why and how to act is the key. This article explores the use of psychology to improve the effectiveness of advertising to youth and details the harm suffered by children as a result of some of this advertising. A discussion of ethical considerations related to specific guiding principles (...)
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  18. Matthew H. Kramer (2009). Moral Principles and Legal Validity. Ratio Juris 22 (1):44-61.score: 30.0
    Two recent high-quality articles, including one in this journal, have challenged the Inclusivist and Incorporationist varieties of legal positivism. David Lefkowitz and Michael Giudice, writing from perspectives heavily influenced by the work of Joseph Raz, have endeavored—in sophisticated and interestingly distinct ways—to vindicate Raz's contention that moral principles are never among the law-validating criteria in any legal system nor among the laws that are applied as binding bases for adjudicative and administrative decisions in such a system. The present article (...)
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  19. Ian Carter, Matthew H. Kramer & Hillel Steiner (eds.) (2007). Freedom: A Philosophical Anthology. Blackwell Pub..score: 30.0
    Edited by leading contributors to the literature, Freedom: An Anthology is the most complete anthology on social, political and economic freedom ever compiled. Offers a broad guide to the vast literature on social, political and economic freedom. Contains selections from the best scholarship of recent decades as well as classic writings from Hobbes, Locke, Rousseau and Kant among others. General and sectional introductions help to orient the reader. Compiled and edited by three important contributors to the field.
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  20. Stephan Krämer (2010). How Not to Defend Ontological Cheats. Analysis 70 (2):290-296.score: 30.0
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  21. Matthew H. Kramer (2012). What Is Legal Philosophy? Metaphilosophy 43 (1-2):125-134.score: 30.0
    This article delineates some of the main issues that are debated by philosophers of law. It explores the connections between legal philosophy and other areas of philosophy, while also seeking to specify the distinctiveness of many of the concerns that have preoccupied philosophers of law. It illustrates its abstract points with examples focused on the separability of law and morality, the nature of the rule of law, the nature of rights, justifications for the imposition of punishment, and the identification of (...)
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  22. Matthew H. Kramer (2001). On the Unavoidability of Actions: Quentin Skinner, Thomas Hobbes, and the Modern Doctrine of Negative Liberty. Inquiry 44 (3):315 – 330.score: 30.0
    During the past few decades, Quentin Skinner has been one of the most prominent critics of the ideas about negative liberty that have developed out of the writings of Isaiah Berlin. Among Skinner?s principal charges against the contemporary doctrine of negative liberty is the claim that the proponents of that doctrine have overlooked the putative fact that people can be made unfree to refrain from undertaking particular actions. In connection with this matter, Skinner contrasts the present-day theories with the prototypical (...)
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  23. Matthew H. Kramer (1999). Requirements, Reasons, and Raz: Legal Positivism and Legal Duties. Ethics 109 (2):375-407.score: 30.0
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  24. Jagdish Mehra, Kimball A. Milton & Peter Rembiesa (1999). The Young Julian Schwinger. IV. During the Second World War. Foundations of Physics 29 (6):967-1010.score: 30.0
    In this series of articles the early life and work of the young Julian Schwinger are explored. In the present article, Schwinger's work at the MIT Radiation Laboratory during the Second World War is described.
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  25. Jagdish Mehra, Kimball A. Milton & Peter Rembiesa (1999). The Young Julian Schwinger. V. Winding Up at the Radiation Lab, Going to Harvard, and Marriage. Foundations of Physics 29 (7):1119-1162.score: 30.0
    In this series of articles the early life and work of the young Julian Schwinger are explored. In the present article, we discuss Schwinger's winding up his work at the MIT Radiation Laboratory, being offered a tenured professorship at Harvard University, getting married, and settling down into a highly productive teaching and research career.
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  26. Jagdish Mehra, Kimball A. Milton & Peter Rembiesa (1999). The Young Julian Schwinger. III. Schwinger Goes to Berkeley. Foundations of Physics 29 (6):931-966.score: 30.0
    In this series of articles the early life and work of the young Julian Schwinger is explored. After a brilliant beginning at Columbia University, where he received his Ph.D., Schwinger went to work with J. Robert Oppenheimer in Berkeley. His stay, work, and interactions with Oppenheimer are discussed.
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  27. Jagdish Mehra, Kimball A. Milton & Peter Rembiesa (1999). The Young Julian Schwinger. I. A New York City Childhood. Foundations of Physics 29 (5):767-786.score: 30.0
    In this series of articles the early life and work of the young Julian Schwinger are explored. In this first article, Schwinger's childhood, growing-up, and early education are discussed.
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  28. Kenneth Kramer (2003). Martin Buber's I and Thou: Practicing Living Dialogue. Paulist Press.score: 30.0
    The twofold world -- Three relational realms -- What is "genuine community" -- Who is the "real I"? -- Glimpsing the "eternal thou" -- The way of "turning" -- Postscript -- Frequently asked questions -- The way of "inclusion".
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  29. Jagdish Mehra, Kimball A. Milton & Peter Rembiesa (1999). The Young Julian Schwinger. II. Julian Schwinger at Columbia University. Foundations of Physics 29 (5):787-817.score: 30.0
    In this series of articles the life and work of the young Julian Schwinger are explored. In this second article in the series, Schwinger's work at Columbia University, up to the completion of his doctorate and a little after, is discussed. Schwinger soon matured into a brilliant theoretical physicist.
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  30. K. P. Rankin, E. Baldwin, C. Pace-Savitsky, J. H. Kramer & B. L. Miller (2005). Self Awareness and Personality Change in Dementia. Journal of Neurology, Neurosurgery and Psychiatry 76 (5):632-639.score: 30.0
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  31. Francis Bacon & J. R. Milton (1996). Novum Organum. British Journal for the Philosophy of Science 47 (1):125-128.score: 30.0
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  32. Leonard Gamberg, George R. Kalbfleisch & Kimball A. Milton (2000). Direct and Indirect Searches for Low-Mass Magnetic Monopoles. Foundations of Physics 30 (4):543-565.score: 30.0
    Recently, there has been renewed interest in the search for low-mass magnetic monopoles. At the University of Oklahoma we are performing an experiment (Fermilab E882) using material from the old D0 and CDF detectors to set limits on the existence of Dirac monopoles of masses of the order of 500 GeV. To set such limits, estimates must be made of the production rate of such monopoles at the Tevatron collider, and of the binding strength of any such produced monopoles to (...)
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  33. Stephan Krämer (2013). A Simpler Puzzle of Ground. Thought: A Journal of Philosophy 2 (2):85-89.score: 30.0
    Metaphysical grounding is standardly taken to be irreflexive: nothing grounds itself. Kit Fine has presented some puzzles that appear to contradict this principle. I construct a particularly simple variant of those puzzles that is independent of several of the assumptions required by Fine, instead employing quantification into sentence position. Various possible responses to Fine's puzzles thus turn out to apply only in a restricted range of cases.
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  34. Matthew H. Kramer (2009). Brian Leiter: Naturalizing Jurisprudence: Essays on American Legal Realism and Naturalism in Legal Philosophy. Criminal Law and Philosophy 3 (1):107-110.score: 30.0
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  35. Ian Carter & Matthew H. Kramer (2008). How Changes in One's Preferences Can Affect One's Freedom (and How They Cannot): A Reply to Dowding and Van Hees. Economics and Philosophy 24 (1):81-96.score: 30.0
  36. David A. Ralston, Carolyn P. Egri, Emmanuelle Reynaud, Narasimhan Srinivasan, Olivier Furrer, David Brock, Ruth Alas, Florian Wangenheim, Fidel León Darder, Christine Kuo, Vojko Potocan, Audra I. Mockaitis, Erna Szabo, Jaime Ruiz Gutiérrez, Andre Pekerti, Arif Butt, Ian Palmer, Irina Naoumova, Tomasz Lenartowicz, Arunas Starkus, Vu Thanh Hung, Tevfik Dalgic, Mario Molteni, María Teresa Garza Carranza, Isabelle Maignan, Francisco B. Castro, Yong-Lin Moon, Jane Terpstra-Tong, Marina Dabic, Yongjuan Li, Wade Danis, Maria Kangasniemi, Mahfooz Ansari, Liesl Riddle, Laurie Milton, Philip Hallinger, Detelin Elenkov, Ilya Girson, Modesta Gelbuda, Prem Ramburuth, Tania Casado, Ana Maria Rossi, Malika Richards, Cheryl Deusen, Ping-Ping Fu, Paulina Man Kei Wan, Moureen Tang, Chay-Hoon Lee, Ho-Beng Chia, Yongquin Fan & Alan Wallace (2011). A Twenty-First Century Assessment of Values Across the Global Workforce. Journal of Business Ethics 104 (1):1-31.score: 30.0
    This article provides current Schwartz Values Survey (SVS) data from samples of business managers and professionals across 50 societies that are culturally and socioeconomically diverse. We report the society scores for SVS values dimensions for both individual- and societal-level analyses. At the individual-level, we report on the ten circumplex values sub-dimensions and two sets of values dimensions (collectivism and individualism; openness to change, conservation, self-enhancement, and self-transcendence). At the societal-level, we report on the values dimensions of embeddedness, hierarchy, mastery, affective (...)
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  37. Lloyd S. Kramer & Sarah C. Maza (eds.) (2002). A Companion to Western Historical Thought. Blackwell Publishers.score: 30.0
    The volume comprises 24 chapters by leading historians who discuss conceptions of and approaches to the human past in the ancient, medieval, early modern and ...
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  38. Matthew H. Kramer (2008). Is Law's Conventionality Consistent with Law's Objectivity? Res Publica 14 (4):241-252.score: 30.0
    Legal positivism’s multi-faceted insistence on the separability of law and morality includes an insistence on the thoroughly conventional status of legal norms as legal norms. Yet the positivist affirmation of the conventionality of law may initially seem at odds with the mind-independence of the existence and contents and implications of legal norms. Mind-independence, a central aspect of legal objectivity, has been seen by some theorists as incompatible with the mind-dependence of conventions. Such a perception of incompatibility has led some anti-positivist (...)
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  39. Matthew H. Kramer & Nigel E. Simmonds (1998). No Better Reasons: A Reply to Alan Gewirth. Southern Journal of Philosophy 36 (1):131-139.score: 30.0
    Alan Gewirth has propounded a moral theory which commits him to the view that prescriptions can appropriately be addressed to people who have neither any moral reasons nor any prudential reasons to follow the prescriptions. We highlight the strangeness of Gewirth's position and then show that it undermines his attempt to come up with a supreme moral principle.
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  40. Liesbeth Flobbe, Rineke Verbrugge, Petra Hendriks & Irene Krämer (2008). Children's Application of Theory of Mind in Reasoning and Language. Journal of Logic, Language and Information 17 (4):417-442.score: 30.0
    Many social situations require a mental model of the knowledge, beliefs, goals, and intentions of others: a Theory of Mind (ToM). If a person can reason about other people’s beliefs about his own beliefs or intentions, he is demonstrating second-order ToM reasoning. A standard task to test second-order ToM reasoning is the second-order false belief task. A different approach to investigating ToM reasoning is through its application in a strategic game. Another task that is believed to involve the application of (...)
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  41. Matthew H. Kramer (2003). On the Counterfactual Dimension of Negative Liberty. Politics, Philosophy and Economics 2 (1):63-92.score: 30.0
    This article explores some implications of the counterfactual aspect of freedom and unfreedom. Because actions can be unprevented even if they are not undertaken, and conversely because actions can be prevented even if they are not attempted and are thus not overtly thwarted, any adequate account of negative liberty must ponder numerous counterfactual chains of events. Each person's freedom or unfreedom is affected not only by what others in fact do, but also by what they are disposed to do. Their (...)
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  42. Matthew H. Kramer (2008). Wilfrid E. Rumble, Doing Austin Justice: The Reception of John Austin's Philosophy of Law in Nineteenth-Century England (London and New York: Continuum, 2005), Pp. XI + 270. [REVIEW] Utilitas 20 (2):252-254.score: 30.0
  43. J. R. Milton (1987). Induction Before Hume. British Journal for the Philosophy of Science 38 (1):49-74.score: 30.0
  44. Matthew H. Kramer (2001). Freedom, Unfreedom and Skinner's Hobbes. Journal of Political Philosophy 9 (2):204–216.score: 30.0
  45. Matthew H. Kramer (1996). How Not to Oppugn Consequentialism. Philosophical Quarterly 46 (183):213-220.score: 30.0
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  46. Martin Kramer (1962). Malcolm on Dreaming. Mind 71 (January):81-86.score: 30.0
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  47. Jonathan Matusitz & Eric Kramer (2011). A Critique of Bernstein's Beyond Objectivism and Relativism: Science, Hermeneutics, and Praxis. [REVIEW] Poiesis and Praxis 7 (4):291-303.score: 30.0
    This analysis comments on Bernstein’s lack of clear understanding of subjectivity, based on his book, Beyond Objectivism and Relativism: Science, Hermeneutics, and Praxis. Bernstein limits his interpretation of subjectivity to thinkers such as Gadamer and Habermas. The authors analyze the ideas of classic scholars such as Edmund Husserl and Friedrich Nietzsche. Husserl put forward his notion of transcendental subjectivity and phenomenological ramifications of the relationship between subjectivity and objectivity. Nietzsche referred to subjectivity as perspectivism, the inescapable fact that any and (...)
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  48. Matthew H. Kramer (1989). G. A. Cohen's Conception of Law: A Critique. Ratio Juris 2 (3):283-298.score: 30.0
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  49. Lloyd S. Kramer (1997). Historical Narratives and the Meaning of Nationalism. Journal of the History of Ideas 58 (3):525-545.score: 30.0
  50. Lloyd Kramer (2001). On How to Kick the History Habit and Discover That Every Day in Every Way, Things Are Getting Meta and Meta and Meta . . [REVIEW] History and Theory 40 (1):104–116.score: 30.0
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