Search results for 'Mind and body History' (try it on Scholar)

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  1. Tim Crane & Sarah Patterson (eds.) (2000). History of the Mind-Body Problem. New York: Routledge.
    This collection of new essays put the debates on the mind-body problem into historical context.
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  2.  44
    J. N. Wright & P. Potter (eds.) (2003). Psyche and Soma: Physicians and Metaphysicians on the Mind-Body Problem From Antiquity to Enlightenment. Oxford University Press University Press.
    This is a multi-disciplinary exploration of the history of understanding of the human mind or soul and its relationship to the body, through the course of more than two thousand years. Thirteen specially commissioned chapters, each written by a recognized expert, discuss such figures as the doctors Hippocrates and Galen, the theologians St Paul, Augustine, and Aquinas, and philosophers from Plato to Leibniz.
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  3. J. S. Mackenzie (1912). MCDOUGALL, W. - Body and Mind: A History and a Defence of Animism. [REVIEW] Mind 21:104.
     
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    Roger Smith (2010). The Cure Within: A History of MindBody Medicine. [REVIEW] British Journal for the History of Science 43 (2):320-322.
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  5.  6
    Erling Skorpen (1973). Pin-Pricks to the Body and Pains to the Mind: A Natural History and Philosophy. Philosophy Forum 14 (September):53-79.
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  6.  5
    J. Yoo (2005). History of the Mind-Body Problem, Edited by Tim Crane and Sarah Patterson. Teaching Philosophy 1:80-82.
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  7.  14
    Julie Yoo (2005). History of the Mind-Body Problem. Teaching Philosophy 28 (1):80-83.
  8.  10
    Sam S. Rakover (1992). Outflanking the Mind-Body Problem: Scientific Progress in the History of Psychology. Journal for the Theory of Social Behaviour 22 (2):145–173.
  9. W. Brown (1911). William McDougall, Body and Mind; A History and Defence of Animism. [REVIEW] Hibbert Journal 10:960.
     
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  10. William Mc Dougall (1912). Body and Mind. A history and a defense of animism. Revue Philosophique de la France Et de l'Etranger 73 (4):654-658.
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  11.  0
    William Mcdougall (1912). Body and Mind: A History and a Defense of Animism. Philosophical Review 21 (5):585-592.
  12. M. Mcgann (2002). Tim Crane and Sarah Patterson , History of the Mind-Body Problem. International Journal of Philosophical Studies 10 (1):103-105.
     
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  13.  0
    W. B. Pillsbury (1912). McDougall's Body and Mind: A History and Defense of Animism. [REVIEW] Journal of Philosophy 9 (17):469.
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  14.  66
    Michael Della Rocca (1996). Representation and the Mind-Body Problem in Spinoza. Oxford University Press.
    This first extensive study of Spinoza's philosophy of mind concentrates on two problems crucial to the philosopher's thoughts on the matter: the requirements for having a thought about a particular object, and the problem of the mind's relation to the body. Della Rocca contends that Spinoza's positions are systematically connected with each other and with a principle at the heart of his metaphysical system: his denial of causal or explanatory relations between the mental and the physical. In (...)
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  15.  78
    Carol A. Rovane (2000). Not Mind-Body but Mind-Mind. Journal of Consciousness Studies 7 (4):82-92.
    [opening paragraph]: My comment will focus on the following five claims of Humphrey's. At some points I will be drawing on his book A History of the Mind as well as the target article in this issue.
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  16.  11
    John Elias Nale (2015). Kant’s Racial MindBody Unions. Continental Philosophy Review 48 (1):41-58.
    Eric Voegelin’s writings on the historical development of the concept of race in the early 1930s are important to philosophy today in part because they provide a model upon which scholars can further integrate modern philosophy with the critical philosophy of race. In constructing his history, Voegelin’s methodological orientation depends on the centrality of both Kant’s work and the problem of the mindbody union to the concept of race. This essay asks how one might hold these premises (...)
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  17.  26
    N. Humphrey (1992/1999). A History of the Mind: Evolution and the Birth of Consciousness. Simon and Schuster.
    This book is a tour-de-force on how human consciousness may have evolved. From the "phantom pain" experienced by people who have lost their limbs to the uncanny faculty of "blindsight," Humphrey argues that raw sensations are central to all conscious states and that consciousness must have evolved, just like all other mental faculties, over time from our ancestorsodily responses to pain and pleasure. '.
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  18.  15
    Don Garrett (2000). Representation and the Mind-Body Problem in Spinoza. [REVIEW] Philosophy and Phenomenological Research 61 (1):223-226.
  19. Michael G. F. Martin (2000). Beyond Dispute: Sense-Data, Intentionality, and the Mind-Body Problem. In Tim Crane & Sarah A. Patterson (eds.), The History of the Mind-Body Problem. Routledge
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  20. Erik Nis Ostenfeld (1987). Ancient Greek Psychology and the Modern Mind-Body Debate. Aarhus University Press.
  21.  3
    Karen Carnabucci (2012). Integrating Psychodrama and Systemic Constellation Work: New Directions for Action Methods, Mind-Body Therapies, and Energy Healing. Jessica Kingsley Publishers.
    Systemic Constellation Work is a rapidly growing experiential healing process that is being embraced by a variety of helping professionals, both traditional and alternative, worldwide. This book explores the history, principles and methodology of this approach, and offers a detailed comparison with psychodrama - the original mind-body therapy - explaining how each method can enhance the other. Constellation work is based on the notion that people are connected by unseen energetic forces and suggests that the psychological, traumatic (...)
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  22.  11
    Liam P. Dempsey (2006). Written in the Flesh: Isaac Newton on the MindBody Relation. Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part A 37 (3):420-441.
    Isaac Newton’s views on the mindbody relation are of interest not only because of their somewhat unique departure from popular early modern conceptions of mind and its relation to body, but also because of their connections with other aspects of Newton’s thought. In this paper I argue that (1) Newton accepted an interesting sort of mindbody monism, one which defies neat categorization, but which clearly departs from Cartesian substance dualism, and (2) Newton took the (...)
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  23. Marleen Rozemond (1999). Descartes on Mind-Body Interaction: What's the Problem? Journal of the History of Philosophy 37 (3):435-467.
    I argue that Descartes treated the action of body on mind differently from the action of mind on body, as was common in the period. Descartes explicitly denied that there is a problem for interaction but his descriptions of interaction seem to suggest that he thought there was a problem. I argue that these descriptions are motivated by a different issue, the seemingly arbitrary connections between particular physical states and the particular mental states they produce. Within (...)
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  24.  4
    Howard Evans Kiefer & Milton Karl Munitz (eds.) (1970). Mind, Science, and History. Albany,State University of New York Press.
    THE LIMITS OF NATURALISM Brand Blanshard I The Issue The purpose of this paper is to consider whether science, as currently conceived, is adequate to the ...
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  25.  13
    Stuart Kauffman (2014). Beyond the Stalemate: Conscious MInd -Body - Quantum Mechanics - Free Will - Possible Panpsychism - Possible Interpretation of Quantum Enigma. Cosmos and History: The Journal of Natural and Social Philosophy 10 (1):149-169.
    I wish to discuss a large, interwoven set of topics pointed at in the title above. Much of what I say is highly speculative, some is testable, some is, at present, surely not. It is, I hope, useful, to set these ideas forth for our consideration. What I shall say assumes quantum measurement is real, and that Bohm's interpretation of Quantum Mechanics is not true. The Stalemate: In our contemporary neurobiology and much of the philosophy of mind post Descartes (...)
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  26. Colin R. Marshall (2009). The Mind and the Body as 'One and the Same Thing' in Spinoza. British Journal for the History of Philosophy 17 (5):897-919.
    I argue that, contrary to how he is often read, Spinoza did not believe that the mind and the body were numerically identical. This means that we must find some alternative reading for his claims that they are 'one and the same thing' (I describe three such alternative readings).
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  27.  35
    David Yandell (1997). What Descartes Really Told Elisabeth: Mind-Body Union as a Primitive Notion. British Journal for the History of Philosophy 5 (2):249 – 273.
    (1997). What Descartes really told Elisabeth: Mindbody union as a primitive notion. British Journal for the History of Philosophy: Vol. 5, No. 2, pp. 249-273. doi: 10.1080/09608789708570966.
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  28.  24
    Harald Walach (2007). Mind -- Body -- Spirituality. Mind and Matter 5 (2):215-240.
    The argument of this paper is that the modern brain-consciousness debate has left out one important element: the question of a transpersonal or spirit-like element of consciousness. Thus the problem really is not a mind-body-problem or brain-consciousness problem, but a mind-body-spirit or brain-consciousness-soul problem. Looking at the history of the debate it can be seen that, explicitly or implicitly, this aspect has always been part of the philosophical debate. Most notably, this can be seen in (...)
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  29.  17
    Kevin White (2009). Forming the Mind: Essays on the Internal Senses and the Mind/Body Problem From Avicenna to the Medical Enlightenment (Review). Journal of the History of Philosophy 47 (1):pp. 137-138.
    This collection grew out of a conference held in Uppsala in 2002, at which an international group of scholars met to discuss several texts from between 1100 and 1700 dealing with questions of philosophical psychology. The conference was motivated by the thesis that the history of philosophy in these six centuries should not be divided into a medieval and a modern period, but rather seen as a continuous tradition .Henrik Lagerlund’s introduction traces the origin of issues in contemporary philosophy (...)
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  30.  1
    Justin E. H. Smith (2008). Language, Bipedalism and the MindBody Problem in Edward Tyson's Orang‐Outang (1699). Intellectual History Review 17 (3):291-304.
    (2007). Language, Bipedalism and the MindBody Problem in Edward Tyson’s Orang‐Outang (1699) Intellectual History Review: Vol. 17, No. 3, pp. 291-304.
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  31. John Sutton (2010). Exograms and Interdisciplinarity: History, the Extended Mind, and the Civilizing Process. In Richard Menary (ed.), The Extended Mind. MIT Press 189--225.
    On the extended mind hypothesis (EM), many of our cognitive states and processes are hybrids, unevenly distributed across biological and nonbiological realms. In certain circumstances, things - artifacts, media, or technologies - can have a cognitive life, with histories often as idiosyncratic as those of the embodied brains with which they couple. The realm of the mental can spread across the physical, social, and cultural environments as well as bodies and brains. My independent aims in this chapter are: first, (...)
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  32.  49
    Grant Duncan (2000). Mind-Body Dualism and the Biopsychosocial Model of Pain: What Did Descartes Really Say? Journal of Medicine and Philosophy 25 (4):485 – 513.
    In the last two decades there have been many critics of western biomedicine's poor integration of social and psychological factors in questions of human health. Such critiques frequently begin with a rejection of Descartes' mind-body dualism, viewing this as the decisive philosophical moment, radically separating the two realms in both theory and practice. It is argued here, however, that many such readings of Descartes have been selective and misleading. Contrary to the assumptions of many recent authors, Descartes' dualism (...)
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  33.  2
    Susan Pearson (2013). Speaking Bodies, Speaking Minds: Animals, Language, History. History and Theory 52 (4):91-108.
    This essay explores a nineteenth-century debate over the linguistic capacity of animals in order to consider the links among language, reason, and history. Taking the American animal-protection movement as a point of departure, I show how protectionists, linguists, anthropologists, and advocates of deaf education were divided about the origins and nature of language. Was language a product of the soul and thus unique to humans, or was it a function of the body, a complex form of the corporeal (...)
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  34. John P. Wright & Paul Potter (eds.) (2000). Psyche and Soma: Physicians and Metaphysicians on the Mind-Body Problem From Antiquity to Enlightenment. Clarendon Press.
    Psyche and Soma is a multi-disciplinary exploration of the history of understanding of the human mind or soul and its relationship to the body, through the course of more than two thousand years. Thirteen specially commissioned chapters, each written by a recognized expert, discuss such figures as the doctors Hippocrates and Galen, the theologians St Paul, Augustine, and Aquinas, and philosophers from Plato to Leibniz.
     
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  35. Hilary Putnam (1981). Reason, Truth, and History. Cambridge University Press.
    Hilary Putnam deals in this book with some of the most fundamental persistent problems in philosophy: the nature of truth, knowledge and rationality. His aim is to break down the fixed categories of thought which have always appeared to define and constrain the permissible solutions to these problems.
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  36.  2
    Sorin Calin (2010). Corpul, o metaforã a mintii/ The Body, A Metaphor of Mind. Journal for the Study of Religions and Ideologies 2 (5):143-157.
    This paper attempts to explain the theory of the body as seen by I.P. Culianu. Thus, starting from the idea that the soul is full of body – which is motivated by theories in the domain of fashion – through which the body is that which assumes the defining symbolic charge of the spirit which inhabits it. Reversing the order of things, if one looks in the latter portions of the vast work of I.P. Culianu the perspective (...)
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  37. Shaun Gallagher (2005). How the Body Shapes the Mind. Oxford: Clarendon Press.
    How the Body Shapes the Mind is an interdisciplinary work that addresses philosophical questions by appealing to evidence found in experimental psychology, neuroscience, studies of pathologies, and developmental psychology. There is a growing consensus across these disciplines that the contribution of embodiment to cognition is inescapable. Because this insight has been developed across a variety of disciplines, however, there is still a need to develop a common vocabulary that is capable of integrating discussions of brain mechanisms in neuroscience, (...)
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  38. Steve Matthews (2010). A History of Philosophy of Mind in Australasia. In N. N. Trakakis (ed.), A Companion to Philosophy in Australia and New Zealand. Monash University Publishing
  39. Henrik Lagerlund (2011). The Unity of Efficient and Final Causality: The Mind/Body Problem Reconsidered. British Journal for the History of Philosophy 19 (4):587 - 603.
    In this paper, I argue that it is in the fourteenth century that the problem of the compatibility or unity of efficient and final causality emerges. William Ockham and John Buridan start to flirt with a mechanized view of nature solely explainable by efficient causality, and they hence push final causality into the human mind and use it to explain for example action, morality and the good. Their argumentation introduces the problem of how to give a unified account of (...)
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  40.  5
    Liam P. Dempsey (2009). Thinking-Matter Then and Now: The Evolution of Mind-Body Dualism. History of Philosophy Quarterly 26 (1):43 - 61.
    Since the seventeenth century, mind-body dualism has undergone an evolution, both in its metaphysics and its supporting arguments. In particular, debates in seventeenth- and eighteenth-century England prepared the way for the fall of substance dualism—the view that the human mind is an immaterial substance capable of independent existence—and the rise of a much less radical property dualism. The evolution from the faltering plausibility of substance dualism to the growing appeal of property dualism depended on at least two (...)
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  41.  39
    Tad M. Schmaltz (1994). Malebranche on Descartes on Mind-Body Distinctness. Journal of the History of Philosophy 32 (4):573-603.
    This article considers Descartes's famous claim that mind and body are distinct substances from the unusual perspective of Nicolas Malebranche. In particular, it focuses on Malebranche's argument that since Cartesians feel compelled to support such a claim by appealing to their clear idea of body, they must lack access to a clear idea of soul. The main conclusion is that while such an argument does not apply directly to Descartes's discussion in the "Meditations" of mind- (...) distinctness, this discussion nonetheless renders Descartes vulnerable to Malebranche's central charge that the nature of body is for Cartesians better known than the nature of the soul. (shrink)
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  42.  63
    Fred Ablondi (2008). François Lamy, Occasionalism, and the Mind-Body Problem. Journal of the History of Philosophy 46 (4):pp. 619-629.
    There is a long-standing view that Malebranche and his fellow occasionalists accepted occasionalism to solve the problem of interaction between immaterial souls and extended bodies. Recently, however, scholars have shown this story to be a myth. Malebranche, Geulincx, La Forge, and Cordemoy adopted occasionalism for a variety of reasons, but none did so because of a need to provide a solution to a perceived mind-body problem. Yet there is one Cartesian for whom the “traditional” reading is largely on (...)
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  43.  3
    G. Gorham (1994). Mind-Body Dualism and the Harvey-Descartes Controversy. Journal of the History of Ideas 55 (2):211-234.
    Descartes and William Harvey engaged in a polite dispute about the cause of the heart's motion. Descartes saw the heart's motion of passive; Harvey saw it as active. I criticize three prominent explanations for Descartes' opposition to Harvey's theory. I argue that Descartes found Harvey's model to be inconsistent with mind-body dualism and this was the reason he opposed it.
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  44.  5
    Justin M. Riddle (2014). Mind/Body/Spirit Complex in Quantum Mechanics. Cosmos and History: The Journal of Natural and Social Philosophy 10 (1):61-77.
    Prevailing theories of consciousness may be characterized as either a physicalist view of mind with material building blocks that grow in complexity unto an emergent conscious experience, or as a dualistic model in which mind-body interaction is taken as the interface of conscious intent and unconscious bodily processing. Roger Penrose supports a model of consciousness that goes beyond dualism by adding a third domain [19]. The Three World model describes interconnected yet independent aspects of consciousness: Physical, Mental (...)
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  45. Gordon Rattray Taylor (1979/1981). The Natural History of the Mind. Penguin Books.
     
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  46.  0
    Alan Charles Kors (2010). Mind, Body, and Soul: Ideas in Context. Modern Intellectual History 7 (3):643-652.
    Ann Thomson's Bodies of Thought is simultaneously an outgrowth of her prior work and a new direction in her scholarship. She has done rigorous and original study of the mid-eighteenth-century French materialist Julien Offray de La Mettrie, offering important critical editions and major articles. She also has done fruitful studies of broader issues of eighteenth-century medicine, vitalism, Epicureanism, and clandestine literature. These endeavors immersed her in precisely the consequences—both intended and unintended, in France, above all—of the sorts of debates that (...)
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  47.  67
    Nicholas Humphrey (2000). In Reply [Reply to Commentaries on "How to Solve the Mind-Body Problem"]. Humphrey, Nicholas (2000) in Reply [Reply to Commentaries on "How to Solve the Mind-Body Problem"]. [Journal (Paginated)] 7 (4):98-112.
    Response to commentaries on ‘How to Solve the Mind Body Problem’ by Andy Clark, Daniel Dennett, Naomi Elian, Ralph Ellis, Valerie Gray Hardcastle, Stevan Harnad, Natika Newton, Christian de Quincey, Carol Rovane and Robert van Gulick.
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  48. Nicholas Humphrey (1993). A History of the Mind. Monograph Collection (Matt - Pseudo).
     
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  49.  90
    Elling Ulvestad (2008). Chronic Fatigue Syndrome Defies the Mind-Body-Schism of Medicine. Medicine, Health Care and Philosophy 11 (3):285-292.
    The article maintains that chronic fatigue syndrome can be properly understood only by taking an integrated perspective in which evolutionary, developmental and ecological aspects are considered. The integrative approach, supplemented by a complexity theory and psychoneuroimmunological research, is capable of explaining why there are so few structural aberrations to be found in chronic fatigue syndrome and why specific treatment is so difficult to establish. A major outcome of the investigation, that all individuals with chronic fatigue syndrome are diseased in their (...)
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  50.  64
    Lilli Alanen (2003). Descartes's Concept of Mind. Harvard University Press.
    This is the first book to give an analysis of Descartes's pivotal concept that deals with all the functions of the mind, cognitive as well as volitional, ...
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