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Profile: Miranda Fricker (Birkbeck College)
  1.  99
    Miranda Fricker (2007). Epistemic Injustice: Power and the Ethics of Knowing. Oxford University Press.
    Fricker shows that virtue epistemology provides a general epistemological idiom in which these issues can be forcefully discussed.
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  2.  29
    Miranda Fricker & Jennifer Hornsby (eds.) (2000). Cambridge Companion to Feminism in Philosophy. Cambridge University Press.
    The thirteen specially-commissioned essays in this volume are designed to provide an accessible and stimulating guide through an area of philosophical thought ...
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  3. Miranda Fricker (2003). Epistemic Injustice and a Role for Virtue in the Politics of Knowing. Metaphilosophy 34 (1/2):154-173.
    The dual aim of this article is to reveal and explain a certain phenomenon of epistemic injustice as manifested in testimonial practice, and to arrive at a characterisation of the anti–prejudicial intellectual virtue that is such as to counteract it. This sort of injustice occurs when prejudice on the part of the hearer leads to the speaker receiving less credibility than he or she deserves. It is suggested that where this phenomenon is systematic it constitutes an important form of oppression. (...)
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  4. Miranda Fricker (2014). What's the Point of Blame? A Paradigm Based Explanation. Noûs 49 (3).
    When we hope to explain and perhaps vindicate a practice that is internally diverse, philosophy faces a methodological challenge. Such subject matters are likely to have explanatorily basic features that are not necessary conditions. This prompts a move away from analysis to some other kind of philosophical explanation. This paper proposes a paradigm based explanation of one such subject matter: blame. First, a paradigm form of blame is identified—‘Communicative Blame’—where this is understood as a candidate for an explanatorily basic form (...)
  5.  36
    Miranda Fricker (2010). 10. Can There Be Institutional Virtues? In T. Szabo Gendler & J. Hawthorne (eds.), Oxford Studies in Epistemology. Oxford University Press 3--235.
  6.  70
    Miranda Fricker (2008). Scepticism and the Genealogy of Knowledge: Situating Epistemology in Time. Philosophical Papers 37 (1):27-50.
    My overarching purpose is to illustrate the philosophical fruitfulness of expanding epistemology not only laterally across the social space of other epistemic subjects, but at the same time vertically in the temporal dimension. I set about this by first presenting central strands of Michael Williams' diagnostic engagement with scepticism, in which he crucially employs a Default and Challenge model of justification. I then develop three key aspects of Edward Craig's ‘practical explication' of the concept of knowledge so that they may (...)
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  7.  83
    Miranda Fricker (2006). Powerlessness and Social Interpretation. Episteme 3 (1-2):96-108.
    Our understanding of social experiences is central to our social understanding more generally. But this sphere of epistemic practice can be structurally prejudiced by unequal relations of power, so that some groups suffer a distinctive kind of epistemic injustice—hermeneutical injustice. I aim to achieve a clear conception of this epistemicethical phenomenon, so that we have a workable definition and a proper understanding of the wrong that it inflicts.
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  8. Miranda Fricker (1998). Rational Authority and Social Power: Towards a Truly Social Epistemology. Proceedings of the Aristotelian Society 98 (2):159–177.
    This paper explores the relation between rational authority and social power, proceeding by way of a philosophical genealogy derived from Edward Craig's Knowledge and the State of Nature. The position advocated avoids the errors both of the 'traditionalist' (who regards the socio-political as irrelevant to epistemology) and of the 'reductivist' (who regards reason as just another form of social power). The argument is that a norm of credibility governs epistemic practice in the state of nature, which, when socially manifested, is (...)
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  9. Miranda Fricker (2010). Replies to Alcoff, Goldberg, and Hookway on Epistemic Injustice. Episteme 7 (2):164-178.
    In this paper I respond to three commentaries on Epistemic Injustice: Power and the Ethics of Knowing. In response to Alcoff, I primarily defend my conception of how an individual hearer might develop virtues of epistemic justice. I do this partly by drawing on empirical social psychological evidence supporting the possibility of reflective self-regulation for prejudice in our judgements. I also emphasize the fact that individual virtue is only part of the solution – structural mechanisms also have an essential role (...)
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  10.  61
    Miranda Fricker (2009). The Value of Knowledge and The Test of Time. Royal Institute of Philosophy Supplement 84 (64):121-.
    The current literature on the value of knowledge is marred by two unwarranted presumptions, which together distort the debate and conceal what is perhaps the most basic value of knowledge, as distinct from mere true belief. These presumptions are the Synchronic Presumption, which confines philosophical attention to the present snapshot in time; and the Analytical Presumption, which has people look for the value of knowledge in some kind of warrant. Together these presumptions conceal that the value of knowledge might inhere (...)
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  11.  95
    Miranda Fricker (2012). Group Testimony? The Making of A Collective Good Informant. Philosophy and Phenomenological Research 84 (2):249-276.
  12. Miranda Fricker (2013). Epistemic Justice as a Condition of Political Freedom? Synthese 190 (7):1317-1332.
    I shall first briefly revisit the broad idea of ‘epistemic injustice’, explaining how it can take either distributive or discriminatory form, in order to put the concepts of ‘testimonial injustice’ and ‘hermeneutical injustice’ in place. In previous work I have explored how the wrong of both kinds of epistemic injustice has both an ethical and an epistemic significance—someone is wronged in their capacity as a knower. But my present aim is to show that this wrong can also have a political (...)
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  13.  76
    Miranda Fricker (2010). Beyond Moral Judgment, by Alice Crary. European Journal of Philosophy 18 (2):311-315.
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  14.  66
    Miranda Fricker (1999). Epistemic Oppression and Epistemic Privilege. Canadian Journal of Philosophy 29 (Supplement):191-210.
    (1999). Epistemic Oppression and Epistemic Privilege. Canadian Journal of Philosophy: Vol. 29, Supplementary Volume 25: Civilization and Oppression, pp. 191-210.
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  15.  89
    Miranda Fricker (2008). On Miranda Fricker's Epistemic Injustice: Power and the Ethics of Knowing. Theoria 23 (1):69-71.
    This paper summarizes key themes from my Epistemic Injustice: Power and the Ethics of Knowing (OUP, 2007); and it gives replies to commentators.
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  16. Miranda Fricker (2010). The Relativism of Blame and Williams's Relativism of Distance. Aristotelian Society Supplementary Volume 84 (1):151-177.
    Bernard Williams is a sceptic about the objectivity of moral value, embracing instead a qualified moral relativism—the ‘relativism of distance’. His attitude to blame too is in part sceptical (he thought it often involved a certain ‘fantasy’). I will argue that the relativism of distance is unconvincing, even incoherent; but also that it is detachable from the rest of Williams's moral philosophy. I will then go on to propose an entirely localized thesis I call the relativism of blame, which says (...)
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  17.  70
    Miranda Fricker (1995). Intuition and Reason. Philosophical Quarterly 45 (179):181-189.
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  18. Miranda Fricker (1991). Reason and Emotion. Radical Philosophy 57 (Spring):14-19.
     
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  19.  18
    Miranda Fricker (forthcoming). Linda Martín Alcoff. Episteme.
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  20.  41
    Simon Blackburn, Miranda Fricker, A. C. Grayling, Anthony O'Hear & Bhikhu Parekh (2005). Whose Morality is It Anyway? The Philosophers' Magazine 30 (30):41-49.
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  21.  16
    Miranda Fricker (2008). "Forum on Miranda FRICKER's" Epistemic Injustice: Power and the Ethics of Knowing / Précis. Theoria: Revista de Teoría, Historia y Fundamentos de la Ciencia 23 (61):69-72.
    This paper summarizes key themes from my Epistemic Injustice: Power and the Ethics of Knowing ; and it gives replies to commentators.
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  22.  63
    Alan Saunders & Miranda Fricker, Philosopher's Zone.
    In London in 1993, a black teenager named Stephen Lawrence was fatally stabbed by a small gang of white teenagers. His friend Duwayne Brooks was a witness but the police failed to take his testimony seriously. When someone speaks but is not heard because of accent, sex, or colour, that person is undermined as a knower. This week, we look at was it means to do justice to someone's status as a knower.
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  23.  38
    Miranda Fricker (1997). Review of Feminism and Science. [REVIEW] British Journal for the Philosophy of Science 48 (4):618-620.
  24. Miranda Fricker (2000). Confidence and Irony. In Edward Harcourt (ed.), Morality, Reflection, and Ideology. Oxford University Press
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  25.  42
    Miranda Fricker (2001). Justice for Here and Now. James P. Sterba. Mind 110 (439):854-857.
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  26.  20
    Miranda Fricker (2008). Replies to Critics. Theoria 23 (1):81-86.
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  27.  18
    Miranda Fricker (2000). Sex and Social Justice. Journal of Philosophy 97 (8):471-475.
  28.  3
    Miranda Fricker (1994). Knowledge as Construct. In Kathleen Lennon & Margaret Whitford (eds.), Knowing the Difference: Feminist Perspectives in Epistemology. Routledge 95.
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  29.  2
    Miranda Fricker (2003). 10 Life-Story in Beauvoir's Memoirs. In Claudia Card (ed.), The Cambridge Companion to Simone de Beauvoir. Cambridge University Press 208.
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  30. Miranda Fricker (2010). 1. Institutionalized Groups—Three Aspects. In T. Szabo Gendler & J. Hawthorne (eds.), Oxford Studies in Epistemology. Oxford University Press 3--235.
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  31. Miranda Fricker (2013). Styles of Moral Relativism : A Critical Family Tree. In Roger Crisp (ed.), The Oxford Handbook of the History of Ethics. Oxford University Press
     
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  32.  2
    Miranda Fricker (1997). Review. [REVIEW] British Journal for the Philosophy of Science 48 (4):618-620.
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  33. Michael Brady & Miranda Fricker (eds.) (forthcoming). The Epistemic Life of Groups.
     
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  34. Miranda Fricker (2000). Legitimate Differences: Interpretation in the Abortion Controversy and Other Public Debates. [REVIEW] Radical Philosophy 103.
     
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  35. Miranda Fricker (2002). Power Knowledge and Injustice. In Julian Baggini & Jeremy Stangroom (eds.), New British Philosophy. Routledge
     
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  36. Miranda Fricker & Samuel Guttenplan (eds.) (2008). Reading Ethics. Wiley-Blackwell.
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  37. Miranda Fricker & Samuel D. Guttenplan (eds.) (2009). Reading Ethics: Selected Texts with Interactive Commentary. Wiley-Blackwell.
    This introductory text encourages students to engage with key problems and arguments in ethics through a series of classic and contemporary readings. The text will inspire students to think about the distinctive nature of moral philosophy, and to draw comparisons between different traditions of thought, between ancient and modern philosophies, and between theoretical and literary writing about the place of value in human life. Each of the book's six chapters focuses on a particular theme: the nature of goodness, subjectivity and (...)
     
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  38.  0
    Miranda Fricker & Jennifer Hornsby (2004). The Cambridge Companion to Feminism in Philosophy. Hypatia 19 (4):232-234.
    The thirteen specially-commissioned essays in this volume are written by philosophers at the forefront of feminist scholarship, and are designed to provide an accessible and stimulating guide to a philosophical literature that has seen massive expansion in recent years. Ranging from history of philosophy through metaphysics to philosophy of science, they encompass all the core subject areas commonly taught in anglophone undergraduate and graduate philosophy courses, offering both an overview of and a contribution to the relevant debates. Together they testify (...)
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