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Profile: Miri Albahari (University of Western Australia)
  1. Miri Albahari (2014). Alief or Belief? A Contextual Approach to Belief Ascription. Philosophical Studies 167 (3):701-720.
    There has been a surge of interest over cases where a subject sincerely endorses P while displaying discordant strains of not-P in her behaviour and emotion. Cases like this are telling because they bear directly upon conditions under which belief should be ascribed. Are beliefs to be aligned with what we sincerely endorse or with what we do and feel? If belief doesn’t explain the discordant strains, what does? T.S. Gendler has recently attempted to explain all the discordances by introducing (...)
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  2. Miri Albahari (2014). Insight Knowledge of No Self in Buddhism: An Epistemic Analysis. Philosophers' Imprint 14 (21).
    Imagine a character, Mary Analogue, who has a complete theoretical knowledge of her subject matter: the illusory nature of self. Suppose that when presenting her paper on no self at a conference she suffers stage-fright – a reaction that implies she is under an illusion of the very self whose existence she denies. Might there be something defective about her knowledge of no self? The Buddhist tradition would claim that Mary Analogue, despite her theoretical omniscience, lacks deep ‘insight knowledge’ into (...)
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  3. Miri Albahari (2010). Nirvana and Ownerless Consciousness. In Mark Siderits, Evan Thompson & Dan Zahavi (eds.), Self, No Self?: Perspectives From Analytical, Phenomenological, and Indian Traditions. Oup Oxford.
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  4. Miri Albahari (2009). Witness-Consciousness: Its Definition, Appearance and Reality. Journal of Consciousness Studies 16 (1):62-84.
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  5. Miri Albahari (2008). Buddhism as Philosophy: An Introduction. [REVIEW] Australasian Journal of Philosophy 86 (4):690 – 693.
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  6. Miri Albahari (2006). Analytical Buddhism: The Two-Tiered Illusion of Self. Palgrave Macmillan.
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  7. Miri Albahari (2004). Bernard Faure, Double Exposure: Cutting Across Buddhist and Western Discourses Reviewed By. Philosophy in Review 24 (4):249-251.
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  8. Miri Albahari (2002). Against No-Ātman Theories of Anattā. Asian Philosophy 12 (1):5 – 20.
    Suppose we were to randomly pick out a book on Buddhism or Eastern Philosophy and turn to the section on 'no-self' (anattā). On this central teaching, we would most likely learn that the Buddha rejected the Upanisadic notion of Self (Ātman), maintaining that a person is no more than a bundle of impermanent, conditioned psycho-physical aggregates (khandhas). The rejection of Ātman is seen by many to separate the metaphysically 'extravagant' claims of Hinduism from the austere tenets of Buddhism. The status (...)
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  9. Miri Albahari (2002). Can Heterophenomenology Ground a Complete Science of Consciousness? Noetica.
  10. Miri Albahari (1999). Objective Colours and Evolutionary Value: A Reply to Dedrick. Dialogue 38 (01):99-108.
  11. Miri Albahari (1994). Colour Talk - What's It All About? Cogito 8 (1):29-38.
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