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Mirja Hartimo [9]Mirja Helena Hartimo [2]
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Profile: Mirja Helena Hartimo (University of Tampere)
  1. Sara Heinämaa, Mirja Hartimo & Timo Miettinen (eds.) (2014). Phenomenology and the Transcendental. Routledge.
    The aim of this volume is to offer an updated account of the transcendental character of phenomenology. The main question concerns the sense and relevance of transcendental philosophy today: What can such philosophy contribute to contemporary inquiries and debates after the many reasoned attacks against its idealistic, aprioristic, absolutist and universalistic tendencies—voiced most vigorously by late 20th century postmodern thinkers—as well as attacks against its apparently circular arguments and suspicious metaphysics launched by many analytic philosophers? Contributors also aim to clarify (...)
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  2. Mirja Hartimo (2013). Burt C. Hopkins: The Origin of the Logic of Symbolic Mathematics. Edmund Husserl and Jacob Klein. [REVIEW] Husserl Studies 29 (3):239-249.
  3. Mirja Hartimo (2012). Husserl and the Algebra of Logic: Husserl's 1896 Lectures. [REVIEW] Axiomathes 22 (1):121-133.
    In his 1896 lecture course on logic–reportedly a blueprint for the Prolegomena to Pure Logic –Husserl develops an explicit account of logic as an independent and purely theoretical discipline. According to Husserl, such a theory is needed for the foundations of logic (in a more general sense) to avoid psychologism in logic. The present paper shows that Husserl’s conception of logic (in a strict sense) belongs to the algebra of logic tradition. Husserl’s conception is modeled after arithmetic, and respectively logical (...)
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  4. Mirja Hartimo (ed.) (2010). Phenomenology and Mathematics. Springer.
    This volume aims to establish the starting point for the development, evaluation and appraisal of the phenomenology of mathematics.
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  5. Mirja Hartimo (2010). The Development of Mathematics and the Birth of Phenomenology. In , Phenomenology and Mathematics. Springer. 107--121.
  6. Mirja Helena Hartimo (2008). From Geometry to Phenomenology. Synthese 162 (2):225 - 233.
    Richard Tieszen [Tieszen, R. (2005). Philosophy and Phenomenological Research, LXX(1), 153–173.] has argued that the group-theoretical approach to modern geometry can be seen as a realization of Edmund Husserl’s view of eidetic intuition. In support of Tieszen’s claim, the present article discusses Husserl’s approach to geometry in 1886–1902. Husserl’s first detailed discussion of the concept of group and invariants under transformations takes place in his notes on Hilbert’s Memoir Ueber die Grundlagen der Geometrie that Hilbert wrote during the winter 1901–1902. (...)
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  7. J. Barnes & Mirja Hartimo (2007). REVIEWS-Truth, Etc. Bulletin of Symbolic Logic 13 (4).
     
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  8. Mirja Helena Hartimo (2007). Towards Completeness: Husserl on Theories of Manifolds 1890–1901. Synthese 156 (2):281 - 310.
    Husserl’s notion of definiteness, i.e., completeness is crucial to understanding Husserl’s view of logic, and consequently several related philosophical views, such as his argument against psychologism, his notion of ideality, and his view of formal ontology. Initially Husserl developed the notion of definiteness to clarify Hermann Hankel’s ‘principle of permanence’. One of the first attempts at formulating definiteness can be found in the Philosophy of Arithmetic, where definiteness serves the purpose of the modern notion of ‘soundness’ and leads Husserl to (...)
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  9. Mirja Hartimo (2006). Logic as a Universal Medium or Logic as a Calculus? Husserl and the Presuppositions of “the Ultimate Presupposition of Twentieth Century Philosophy”. Southern Journal of Philosophy 44 (4):569-580.
    This paper discusses Jean van Heijenoort’s (1967) and Jaakko and Merrill B. Hintikka’s (1986, 1997) distinction between logic as auniversal language and logic as a calculus, and its applicability to Edmund Husserl’s phenomenology. Although it is argued that Husserl’s phenomenology shares characteristics with both sides, his view of logic is closer to the model-theoretical, logic-as-calculus view. However, Husserl’s philosophy as transcendental philosophy is closer to the universalist view. This paper suggests that Husserl’s position shows that holding a model-theoretical view of (...)
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  10. Mirja Hartimo (2006). Mathematical Roots of Phenomenology: Husserl and the Concept of Number. History and Philosophy of Logic 27 (4):319-337.
    The paper examines the roots of Husserlian phenomenology in Weierstrass's approach to analysis. After elaborating on Weierstrass's programme of arithmetization of analysis, the paper examines Husserl's Philosophy of Arithmetic as an attempt to provide foundations to analysis. The Philosophy of Arithmetic consists of two parts; the first discusses authentic arithmetic and the second symbolic arithmetic. Husserl's novelty is to use Brentanian descriptive analysis to clarify the fundamental concepts of arithmetic in the first part. In the second part, he founds the (...)
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  11. Mirja Hartimo (2003). Spielbedeutungen. Philosophy Today 47 (5):71-78.
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