Search results for 'Misse Wester' (try it on Scholar)

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  1. Per Sandin & Misse Wester (2009). The Moral Black Hole. Ethical Theory and Moral Practice 12 (3):291 - 301.score: 240.0
    It is commonly believed that people become selfish and turn to looting, price gouging, and other immoral behaviour in emergencies. This has been the basis for an argument justifying extraordinary measures in emergencies. It states that if emergencies are not curtailed, breakdown of moral norms threaten (‘the moral black hole’). Using the example of natural disasters, we argue that the validity of this argument in non-antagonistic situations, i.e. situations other than war and armed conflict, is highly questionable. Available evidence suggests (...)
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  2. G. Wester & J. Wolff (2010). The Social Gradient in Health: How Fair Retirement Could Make a Difference. Public Health Ethics 3 (3):272-281.score: 20.0
    Social inequalities in health in the UK persist despite attempts to reduce them. We argue that work and pensions constitutes an area of intervention where there is potential to make change happen. We propose that workers who are exposed to significant health risks through their occupation should be allowed to draw their state pension earlier, based on a minimum number of years in the workforce. We model this proposal on similar policies in other European countries. In our modification, the pension (...)
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  3. Jutta H. Wester (2008). Dimensiones y retos de una educación para la responsabilidad ciudadana. Utopía y Praxis Latinoamericana 13 (42):55-69.score: 20.0
    Con el fin de discutir las relaciones entre ética, política y educación, el presente artículo analizala crisis del sistema educativo argentino a partir de una categoría ética: la responsabilidad. Más específicamente, se intenta delinear algunos de los retos a los que una educación para la responsabi..
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  4. F. Eric Wester (2013). Ending Wars Well. Journal of Military Ethics 11 (4):368 - 371.score: 20.0
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  5. Amy B. Brunell, Mark S. Davis, Dan R. Schley, Abbey L. Eng, Manfred H. M. van Dulmen, Kelly L. Wester & Daniel J. Flannery (2013). A New Measure of Interpersonal Exploitativeness. Frontiers in Psychology 4.score: 20.0
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  6. Serena Daalmans, Ellen Hijmans & Fred Wester (2014). 'One Night of Prime Time': An Explorative Study of Morality in One Night of Prime Time Television. Journal of Mass Media Ethics 29 (3):184-199.score: 20.0
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  7. Aníbal Fornari, Carlos Pérez Zavala & Jutta Wester (eds.) (2010). La Razón En Tiempos Difíciles: Homenaje a Dorando J. Michelini. Fundación Icala.score: 20.0
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  8. Aníbal Fornari, Carlos Pérez Zavala & Jutta Wester (eds.) (2010). La Razón En Tiempos Difíciles: Homenaje a Dorando J. Fundación Icala.score: 20.0
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  9. Jutta Wester, Gabriela Müller & Lilián Martella (eds.) (2011). Bien Común En Sociedades Democráticas: Xvi Jornadas Internacionales Interdisciplinarias, Río Cuarto, 2 Al 4 de Noviembre de 2011. [REVIEW] Ediciones Del Icala.score: 20.0
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  10. D. Trapp (1966). Canonis Misse Expositio. Augustinianum 6 (3):561-562.score: 15.0
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  11. Joseph Goering & F. A. C. Mantello (1991). Two Opuscula of Robert Grosseteste: De Vniversi Complecione and Exposicio Canonis Misse. Mediaeval Studies 53 (1):89-123.score: 15.0
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  12. William Lauinger (2013). The Missing-Desires Objection to Hybrid Theories of Well-Being. Southern Journal of Philosophy 51 (2):270-295.score: 8.0
    Many philosophers have claimed that we might do well to adopt a hybrid theory of well-being: a theory that incorporates both an objective-value constraint and a pro-attitude constraint. Hybrid theories are attractive for two main reasons. First, unlike desire theories of well-being, hybrid theories need not worry about the problem of defective desires. This is so because, unlike desire theories, hybrid theories place an objective-value constraint on well-being. Second, unlike objectivist theories of well-being, hybrid theories need not worry about being (...)
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  13. Lucy Barnard & William Y. Lan (2008). Treatment of Missing Data: Beyond Ends and Means. [REVIEW] Journal of Academic Ethics 6 (2):173-176.score: 8.0
    The ethical decision making process behind the treatment of missing data has yet to be examined in the research literature in any discipline. The purpose of the current paper is to begin to discuss this decision-making process in view of a Foucauldian framework. The paper suggests how the ethical treatment of missing data should be considered from the adoption of this theoretical framework.
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  14. Joel Best (1994). Innumeracy in Social Problems Construction: Missing Children, Vanishing Workers, and Other Statistical Claims. [REVIEW] Argumentation 8 (4):367-376.score: 8.0
    Statistical claims are often central to the contemporary construction of social problems. The failure to subject these figures to critical analysis is a form of innumeracy, the inability to deal effectively with mathematical concepts. Two cases from the United States -estimates of the number of missing children, and projections for the workforce in the year 2000 -illustrate how the uncritical acceptance of inaccurate statistics can shape policy debates. Claimsmakers, the mass media, and the media audience all contribute to the innumerate (...)
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  15. Karla Hemming & Jane Luise Hutton (2012). Bayesian Sensitivity Models for Missing Covariates in the Analysis of Survival Data. Journal of Evaluation in Clinical Practice 18 (2):238-246.score: 7.0
  16. Aley Thomas & Charles M. Solley (1963). Search-Discrimination Time for Missing Stimulus Information. Journal of Experimental Psychology 65 (5):501.score: 7.0
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  17. Lorna Green, The Great Philosophers: Where They Missed It and Why.score: 6.0
    The great philosophers missed it, and here are the reasons why, how to bring them all up to date, a woman's take on things, with new categories and concepts, like love, oneness, the feminine, the earth, Spirit, the end of the old order, and the beginning of the new.
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  18. Darren Bradley (2011). Functionalist Response-Dependence Avoids Missing Explanations. Analysis 71 (2):297-300.score: 6.0
    I argue that there is a flaw in the way that response-dependence has been formulated in the literature, and this flawed formulation has been correctly attacked by Mark Johnston’s Missing Explanation Argument. Moving to a better formulation, which is analogous to the move from behaviourism to functionalism, avoids the Missing Explanation Argument.
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  19. Slobodan Perovic (2011). Missing Experimental Challenges to the Standard Model of Particle Physics. Studies in History and Philosophy of Modern Physics 42 (1):32-42.score: 6.0
    The success of particle detection in high energy physics colliders critically depends on the criteria for selecting a small number of interactions from an overwhelming number that occur in the detector. It also depends on the selection of the exact data to be analyzed and the techniques of analysis. The introduction of automation into the detection process has traded the direct involvement of the physicist at each stage of selection and analysis for the efficient handling of vast amounts of data. (...)
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  20. Mark Wilson (2009). Determinism and the Mystery of the Missing Physics. British Journal for the Philosophy of Science 60 (1):173-193.score: 6.0
    This article surveys the difficulties in establishing determinism for classical physics within the context of several distinct foundational approaches to the discipline. It explains that such problems commonly emerge due to a deeper problem of ‘missing physics'. The Problems of Formalism Norton's Example Three Species of Classical Mechanics 3.1 Mass point physics 3.2 The physics of perfect constraints 3.3 Continuum mechanics Conclusion CiteULike Connotea Del.icio.us What's this?
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  21. Alba Papa-Grimaldi (1996). Why Mathematical Solutions of Zeno's Paradoxes Miss the Point: Zeno's One and Many Relation and Parmenides' Prohibition. Review of Metaphysics 50 (2):299 - 314.score: 6.0
    MATHEMATICAL RESOLUTIONS OF ZENO’s PARADOXES of motion have been offered on a regular basis since the paradoxes were first formulated. In this paper I will argue that such mathematical “solutions” miss, and always will miss, the point of Zeno’s arguments. I do not think that any mathematical solution can provide the much sought after answers to any of the paradoxes of Zeno. In fact all mathematical attempts to resolve these paradoxes share a common feature, a feature that makes them consistently (...)
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  22. Herbert S. Terrace & Janet Metcalfe (eds.) (2005). The Missing Link in Cognition: Origins of Self-Reflective Consciousness. Oxford University Press.score: 6.0
  23. Uskali Mäki (2009). MISSing the World. Models as Isolations and Credible Surrogate Systems. Erkenntnis 70 (1):29 - 43.score: 6.0
    This article shows how the MISS account of models—as isolations and surrogate systems—accommodates and elaborates Sugden’s account of models as credible worlds and Hausman’s account of models as explorations. Theoretical models typically isolate by means of idealization, and they are representatives of some target system, which prompts issues of resemblance between the two to arise. Models as representations are constrained both ontologically (by their targets) and pragmatically (by the purposes and audiences of the modeller), and these relations are coordinated by (...)
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  24. Jonathan Schaffer (2001). Knowledge, Relevant Alternatives and Missed Clues. Analysis 61 (3):202–208.score: 6.0
    The classic version of the relevant alternatives theory (RAT) identifies knowledge with the elimination of relevant alternatives (Dretske 1981, Stine 1976, Lewis 1996, inter alia). I argue that the RAT is trapped by the problem of the missed clue, in which the subject sees but does not appreciate decisive information.
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  25. Martin Thomson-Jones (2010). Missing Systems and the Face Value Practice. Synthese 172 (2):283 - 299.score: 6.0
    Call a bit of scientific discourse a description of a missing system when (i) it has the surface appearance of an accurate description of an actual, concrete system (or kind of system) from the domain of inquiry, but (ii) there are no actual, concrete systems in the world around us fitting the description it contains, and (iii) that fact is recognised from the outset by competent practitioners of the scientific discipline in question. Scientific textbooks, classroom lectures, and journal articles abound (...)
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  26. Duncan Richter (2001). Missing the Entire Point: Wittgenstein and Religion. Religious Studies 37 (2):161-175.score: 6.0
    In this paper I contrast some widespread ideas about what Wittgenstein said about religious belief with statements Wittgenstein made about his purposes and method in doing philosophy, in order to argue that he did not hold the views commonly attributed to him. These allegedly Wittgensteinian doctrines in fact essentialize religion in a very un-Wittgensteinian way. A truly Wittgensteinian philosophy of religion can only be a personal process, and there can be no part in it for generalized hypotheses or conclusions about (...)
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  27. Neil Levy (2007). The Social: A Missing Term in the Debate Over Addiction and Voluntary Control. American Journal of Bioethics 7 (1):35 – 36.score: 6.0
    The author comments on the article “The Neurobiology of Addiction: Implications for Voluntary Control of Behavior,‘ by S. E. Hyman. Hyman’s article suggests that addicted individuals have impairments in cognitive control of behavior. The author agrees with Hyman’s view that addiction weakens the addict’s ability to align his actions with his judgments. The author states that neuroethics may focus on brains and highlight key aspects of behavior but we still risk missing explanatory elements. Accession Number: 24077912; Authors: Levy, Neil 1,2; (...)
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  28. Graeme S. Halford, Steven Phillips & William H. Wilson (2008). The Missing Link: Dynamic, Modifiable Representations in Working Memory. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 31 (2):137-138.score: 6.0
    We propose that the missing link from nonhuman to human cognition lies with our ability to form, modify, and re-form dynamic bindings between internal representations of world-states. This capacity goes beyond dynamic feature binding in perception and involves a new conception of working memory. We propose two tests for structured knowledge that might alleviate the impasse in empirical research in nonhuman animal cognition.
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  29. Robin Le Poidevin (2005). Missing Elements and Missing Premises: A Combinatorial Argument for the Ontological Reduction of Chemistry. British Journal for the Philosophy of Science 56 (1):117-134.score: 6.0
    Does chemistry reduce to physics? If this means ‘Can we derive the laws of chemistry from the laws of physics?’, recent discussions suggest that the answer is ‘no’. But sup posing that kind of reduction—‘epistemological reduction’—to be impossible, the thesis of ontological reduction may still be true: that chemical properties are determined by more fundamental properties. However, even this thesis is threatened by some objections to the physicalist programme in the philosophy of mind, objections that generalize to the chemical case. (...)
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  30. Brian O'Connor (2006). A Missing Step In Kant's Refutation of Idealism. Idealistic Studies 36 (2):83-95.score: 6.0
    This paper contends that Kant’s argument in the Refutation of Idealism section of the Critique of Pure Reason misses a step which allows Kant to move illicitly from inner experience to outer objects. The argument for persistent outer objects does not comprehensively address the skeptic’s doubts as it leaves room for the question about the necessary connection between representations and outer objects. A second fundamental issue is the ability of transcendental idealism to deliver the account of outer objects, as required (...)
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  31. Arun A. Iyer (2006). The Missing Dynamic: Corporations, Individuals and Contracts. [REVIEW] Journal of Business Ethics 67 (4):393 - 406.score: 6.0
    There are two opposing views on the nature of corporations in contemporary debates on corporate social responsibility. Opponents of corporate personhood hold that a corporation is nothing but a group of individuals coming together to achieve certain goals. On the other hand, the advocates of corporate personhood believe that corporations are persons in their own right existing over and above the individuals who comprise them. They talk of corporate decision-making structures that help translate individual decisions and actions into corporate decisions (...)
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  32. T. Black (2003). The Relevant Alternatives Theory and Missed Clues. Australasian Journal of Philosophy 81 (1):96 – 106.score: 6.0
    According to the relevant alternatives theory of knowledge (RA), I know that p only if my evidence eliminates all relevant alternatives to p . Jonathan Schaffer has recently argued that David Lewis's version of RA, which is perhaps the most detailed version yet provided, cannot account for our failure to know in cases involving missed clues, that is, cases in which we see but fail to appreciate decisive evidence. I argue, however, that Lewis's version of RA survives exposure to missed (...)
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  33. Jussi Haukioja (2006). Why the New Missing Explanation Argument Fails, Too. Erkenntnis 64 (2):169 - 175.score: 6.0
    The so-called missing explanation argument, put forward by Mark Johnston in the late 80’s purported to show that our ordinary concepts of secondary qualities such as the colours cannot be response-dependent. A number of flaws were soon found in the argument. Partly in response to the criticism directed at the original argument, Johnston presented a new version in 1998. In this paper I show that the new version fails, too, for a simple reason: the kind of explanation which Johnston claims (...)
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  34. Peter Andras Varga (2013). The Missing Chapter From the Logical Investigations: Husserl on Lotze's Formal and Real Significance of Logical Laws. Husserl Studies 29 (3):181-209.score: 6.0
    In the Logical Investigations Husserl announced a critique of Lotze’s epistemology, but it was never included in the printed text. The aim of my paper is to investigate the remnant of Husserl’s planned text with special emphasis on the question of whether it goes beyond the obvious aspects of Husserl’s indebtedness to Lotze. Using Husserl’s student notes, excerpts, and book annotations, I refine the dating of Husserl’s encounter with Lotze and separate the various layers of influence. I argue that Husserl’s (...)
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  35. Ashok K. Gangadean (2008). Meditations on Global First Philosophy: Quest for the Missing Grammar of Logos. State University of New York Press.score: 6.0
    The emergence of global first philosophy -- Prologue: Qest for the missing grammar of global logos -- Essays : explorations in global first philosophy -- Overview: Orientation to the essays -- Introduction: Entering the space of global first philosophy -- Essay l: the quest for the universal global science -- Essay 2: logos as the infinite primal word : the global essence of language -- Essay 3: logos and the global mind : the awakening story -- Essay 4: the emergence (...)
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  36. Ilan Fischer & Ravid Bogaire (2012). The Group Calibration Index: A Group-Based Approach for Assessing Forecasters' Expertise When External Outcome Data Are Missing. [REVIEW] Theory and Decision 73 (4):671-685.score: 6.0
    The Group Calibration Index (GCI) provides a means of assessing the quality of forecasters’ predictions in situations that lack external feedback or outcome data. The GCI replaces the missing outcome data with aggregated ratings of a well-defined reference group. A simulation study and two experiments show how the GCI classifies forecaster performance and distinguishes between forecasters with restricted information and those with complete information. The results also show that under certain circumstances, where members of the reference group have high-quality information, (...)
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  37. Patrick Stokes (2010). Whats Missing in Episodic Self-Experience? A Kierkegaardian Response to Galen Strawson. Journal of Consciousness Studies 17 (1-2):1-2.score: 6.0
    In a series of important papers, Galen Strawson has articulated a spectrum of “temporal temperaments,” populated at one end by “Diachronics”, who experience their selves (understood as the “mental entity” they are at this moment) as something that existed in the past and will exist in the future, and at the other end by “Episodics”, who lack any such sense of temporal extension. As a self-declared Episodic, Strawson provides lucid descriptions of what episodicity is like, but cannot furnish a corresponding (...)
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  38. Carol Baily (2009). Reverse Intergenerational Learning: A Missed Opportunity? [REVIEW] AI and Society 23 (1):111-115.score: 6.0
    Traditional teaching pedagogy has the young learning from the old. To improve learning in a business environment, generational differences have been identified as being potential barriers between people. There is a growing realisation that technology can be used to bridge the gap between young and old using reverse mentoring. Moving beyond the confines of using reverse intergenerational learning as a tool for only learning new IT has not yet gained general acceptance in the wider business environment. Surely this represents a (...)
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  39. Rebecca Comay (2008). Missed Revolutions: Translation, Transmission, Trauma. Idealistic Studies 38 (1/2):23-40.score: 6.0
    This essay explores the familiar German ideology according to which a revolution in thought would, in varying proportions, precede, succeed, accommodate,and generally upstage a political revolution whose defining feature was increasingly thought to be its founding violence: the slide from 1789 to 1793. Germany thus sets out to quarantine the political threat of revolution while siphoning off and absorbing the revolution’s intensity and energy for thinking as such. The essay holds that this structure corresponds to the psychoanalytic logic of trauma: (...)
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  40. Erich H. Loewy (1999). Physician Assisted Dying and Death with Dignity: Missed Opportunities and Prior Neglected Conditions. Medicine, Health Care and Philosophy 2 (2):189-194.score: 6.0
    This paper argues that the world-wide debate about physician assisted dying is missing a golden opportunity to focus on the orchestration of the end of life. Such a process consists of far more than adequate pain control and is a skill which, like all other skills, needs to be learned and taught. The debate offers an opportunity to press for the teaching of this skill. Beyond this, the desire to assure that all can have access to palliative care makes sense (...)
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  41. Katarzyna Paprzycka, Lewis Carroll and Missing Premises.score: 6.0
    A: Things that are equal to the same are equal to each other. B: The two sides of this triangle are things that are equal to the same. Z: So, the two sides of this triangle are equal to each other. Achilles fails because he encounters an infinite progression of hidden premises of the form “If all the premises of the argument are true, the conclusion is true”. In [a1], the hidden premise is H1 “If A and B then Z” (...)
     
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  42. Rebecca Comay (2008). Missed Revolutions. Idealistic Studies 38 (1/2):23-40.score: 6.0
    This essay explores the familiar German ideology according to which a revolution in thought would, in varying proportions, precede, succeed, accommodate, and generally upstage a political revolution whose defining feature was increasingly thought to be its founding violence: the slide from 1789 to 1793. Germany thus sets out to quarantine the political threat of revolution while siphoning off and absorbing the revolution’s intensity and energy for thinking as such. The essay holds that this structure corresponds to the psychoanalytic logic of (...)
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  43. Ronald R. Johnson (2004). A Missing Element in Reports of Divine Encounters. Religious Studies 40 (3):351-360.score: 6.0
    Many people claim to have had direct perceptual awareness of God. William Alston, Richard Swinburne, Gary Gutting, and others have based their philosophical views on these reports. But using analogies from our encounters with humans whose abilities surpass our own, we realize that something essential is missing from these reports. The absence of this element renders it highly unlikely that these people have actually encountered a divine being. (Published Online August 11 2004).
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  44. Michael S. Katz (2014). The Role of Trustworthiness in Teaching: An Examination of The Prime of Miss Jean Brodie. Studies in Philosophy and Education 33 (6):621-633.score: 6.0
    The purpose of this paper is to examine the role that trustworthiness plays in the ability of teachers to function as moral role models. Through exploration of Muriel Spark’s novel, The Prime of Miss Jean Brodie, I explain some of the central features of trustworthiness as a moral virtue and suggest how these features are critical to developing moral relationships between teachers and students. I show how and why the character of Miss Jean Brodie fails to embody trustworthiness, and how (...)
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  45. Alastair Iles (2005). Learning in Sustainable Agriculture: Food Miles and Missing Objects. Environmental Values 14 (2):163 - 183.score: 6.0
    Industrial production imposes geographical, economic and cultural distances between producers and consumers. The concept of constituting 'missing objects' can help shrink these distances by enabling actors to engage in discourses and practices about contexts beyond what is materially present. Since the mid-1990s, food miles have emerged as an example of missing objects, representing the distance that agricultural products travel from the farm to the dining table, and the environmental effects of transportation. I analyse how consumers, farmers, activists, industry and policy-makers (...)
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  46. Dwight Read & Francesco Guala (2012). Culture: The Missing Piece in Theories of Weak and Strong Reciprocity. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 35 (1):35.score: 6.0
    Guala does not go far enough in his critique of the assumption that human decisions about sharing made in the context of experimental game conditions accurately reflect decision-making under real conditions. Sharing of hunted animals is constrained by cultural rules and is not as assumed in models of weak and strong reciprocity. Missing in these models is the cultural basis of sharing that makes it a group property rather than an individual one.
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  47. Allan Franklin (forthcoming). The Missing Piece of the Puzzle: The Discovery of the Higgs Boson. Synthese:1-16.score: 6.0
    The missing piece of the puzzle: the discovery of the Higgs boson On July 4, 2012 the CMS and ATLAS collaborations at the large hadron collider jointly announced the discovery of a new elementary particle, which resembled the Higgs boson, the last remaining undiscovered piece of the standard model of elementary particles. Both groups claimed to have observed a five-standard-deviation (five sigmas) effect above background, the gold standard for discovery in high-energy physics. In this essay I will briefly discuss the (...)
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  48. Wayne Grennan (1994). Are "Gap-Fillers" Missing Premisses? Informal Logic 16 (3).score: 6.0
    Identifying the missing or unstated premisses of arguments is important, because their logical quality depends on them. Textbook authors regard enthymematic syllogisms (e.g., "Elvis is a man, so Elvis is mortal") as having an unstated premiss - the major premiss (e.g., "All men are mortal"). They are said to be such because these syllogisms become formally valid when the major premiss is added (i.e., it is a gap-filler). I argue that unstated major premises are not gap-fillers: they support a part (...)
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  49. Hilton Kelly (2012). “Just Something Gone, But Nothing Missing”: Booker T. Washington, Nannie Helen Burroughs, and the Social Significance of Black Teachers Theorizing Across Two Centuries. Educational Studies 48 (3):215-219.score: 6.0
    (2012). “Just Something Gone, But Nothing Missing”: Booker T. Washington, Nannie Helen Burroughs, and the Social Significance of Black Teachers Theorizing Across Two Centuries. Educational Studies: Vol. 48, Black Teachers Theorizing, pp. 215-219.
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  50. Robin Le Poidevin (2005). Missing Elements and Missing Premises: A Combinatorial Argument for the Ontological Reduction of Chemistry. British Journal for the Philosophy of Science 56 (1):117 - 134.score: 6.0
    Does chemistry reduce to physics? If this means 'Can we derive the laws of chemistry from the laws of physics?', recent discussions suggest that the answer is 'no'. But supposing that kind of reduction-'epistemological reduction'-to be impossible, the thesis of ontological reduction may still be true: that chemical properties are determined by more fundamental properties. However, even this thesis is threatened by some objections to the physicalist programme in the philosophy of mind, objections that generalize to the chemical case. (...)
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