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  1. Sharon K. Anderson, Hilary E. Franco & Mitchell M. Handelsman (2000). Psychotherapists' Judgments of Psychotherapy Regulation. Ethics and Behavior 10 (2):173 – 183.
    In 1988, Colorado instituted a new regulatory system that was opposed by psychologists and social workers. We surveyed 306 psychotherapists about their attitudes regarding this system, which included profession-specific licensing boards and an omnibus (multiprofession) board to handle grievances. Social workers and psychologists, members of more established professions, opposed creating an omnibus licensing board and favored the return of profession-specific grievance functions. Members of the newer professions (professional counseling and marriage and family therapy) and unlicensed psychotherapists were not as opposed (...)
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  2. Steven A. Branstetter & Mitchell M. Handelsman (2000). Graduate Teaching Assistants: Ethical Training, Beliefs, and Practices. Ethics and Behavior 10 (1):27 – 50.
    This study assessed several ethical issues and judgments facing graduate teaching assistants (GTAs). Psychology GTAs judged the ethics of a number of teaching-related behaviors and rated how frequently they practiced those behaviors. Judgments of how ethical GTAs believed various behaviors to be, and the frequency with which they engaged in them, varied somewhat based on age, gender, training, and other factors. Moreover, several discrepancies were found between ethical judgments and practice. For example, most GTAs judged it unethical to teach without (...)
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  3. Jenna Goesling, Stacey M. Potts & Mitchell M. Handelsman (2000). Perceptions of Confidentiality Violations Among Psychologists. Ethics and Behavior 10 (4):363 – 374.
    This study explored psychologists' perceptions of confidentiality violations. One hundred ninety-five psychologists answered questionnaires about a vignette regarding a male therapist accused of violating the confidentiality of a female client. The vignette varied on the following variables: (a) Confidential information was conveyed to either an insurance company or another client, (b) the therapist's account of the violation included either an excuse or a justification, and (c) scapegoating was included or not included in the account. The insurance condition and excuse condition (...)
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  4. Mitchell M. Handelsman (1995). Canaries in the Mine Shaft: Frustrations and Benefits of Community Members on Ethics Committees. [REVIEW] HEC Forum 7 (5):278-283.
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  5. Mitchell M. Handelsman, Amos Martinez, Sarah Geisendorfer, Leslie Jordan, Laura Wagner, Pamela Daniel & Shanna Davis (1995). Does Legally Mandated Consent to Psychotherapy Ensure Ethical Appropriateness?: The Colorado Experience. Ethics and Behavior 5 (2):119 – 129.
    We analyzed a sample of 356 forms containing information that Colorado law legally requires both licensed and unlicensed therapists to disclose to clients. The majority of forms contained the legally mandated information; fewer forms contained ethically desirable information. The average readability grade level was 15.74, corresponding to upper-level college, and 63.9% of the forms reached the highest (most difficult) readability grade of 17 +. Therapists are obeying the law, but do not appear to be taking advantage of the opportunity to (...)
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