Search results for 'Modern Indian Philosophy' (try it on Scholar)

1000+ found
Order:
See also:
  1. Stephen F. Brown & International Society for the Study of Medieval Philosophy (1998). Meeting of the Minds the Relations Between Medieval and Classical Modern European Philosophy : Acts of the International Colloquium Held at Boston College, June 14-16, 1996 Organized by the Société Internationale Pour l'Étude de la Philosophie Médiévale. [REVIEW]
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  2. Mark D. Gedney & World Congress of Philosophy (2000). Modern Philosophy. Monograph Collection (Matt - Pseudo).
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  3. Jitendranath Mohanty (1993). Essays on Indian Philosophy Traditional and Modern. Oxford University Press.
    Selected from the works of J. N. Mohanty over a forty-year period, these essays provide an intellectual biography of the man and insights into Eastern philosophy. Part I brings together various writings on problems in metaphysics, epistemology, and language, alongwith thoughtful treatments of notions such as experience, self consciousness, doubt, tradition, and modernity. Part II collects essays written during the exciting though turbulent years following India's independence, and they survey issues in social ethics, reform activities, and religion in the (...)
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   2 citations  
  4. Balaganapathi Devarakonda (2012). Review of Indian Philosophy in English. Philosophical Papers:206-212.
    The present work is an attempt to show that ‘important and original philosophy was written in English, in India, by Indians’ from the late 19th c through the middle of 20th c. (xiv). In fact, it tells us that these works ‘sustained the Indian philosophical tradition and were creators of its modern avatar.’ (xiv) The authors of these works ‘pursued Indian philosophy in a language and format that could render it both accessible and acceptable to (...)
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  5. Satewan Parsram Kanal (1966). Naturalism in Modern Indian Philosophy. Delhi, Motilal Banarasidass.
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  6. A. Raghuramaraju (2009). Enduring Colonialism: Classical Presences and Modern Absences in Indian Philosophy. Oxford University Press.
    This volume explores three significant issues - absence, the consciousness of the contemporary, and new philosophical episteme - relevant to thought-systems in the Indian subcontinent. The author discusses the present lack of original philosophical discourse in the context of South Asia, especially India and investigates the reasons of such absences. It also investigates the reasons for decline in traditional philosophical schools and Sanskritic studies in the subcontinent. The book discusses the manner in which Indian thinkers from the times (...)
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   1 citation  
  7.  1
    Ajay Verma (2015). A. Raghuramraju , Enduring Colonialism: Classical Presences and Modern Absences in Indian Philosophy . Reviewed By. Philosophy in Review 35 (2):103-105.
    No categories
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  8. Paul Brunton (1939). Indian Philosophy and Modern Culture. New York, E.P. Dutton & Co., Inc..
    Indian monism and western thought.--Indian idealist metaphysics and western culture.
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  9.  3
    Peter Schreiner (1978). The Indianness of Modern Indian Philosophy as a Historical and Philosophical Problem. Philosophy East and West 28 (1):21-37.
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  10. Tanaji Acharya (1990). Relevance of Indian Philosophy to Modern Society. Distributor, Indo-Vision.
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  11. V. M. Bedekar (ed.) (1979). Philosophy in the Fifteen Modern Indian Languages. Continental for the Council for the Marathi Encyclopaedia of Philosophy.
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  12. Narayan Kumar Chattopadhyay (1979). Indian Philosophy: Its Exposition in the Light of Vijñānabhikṣu's Bhāṣya and Yogavārittika: A Modern Approach. Sanskrit Pustak Bhandar.
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  13.  11
    Dhirendra Mohan Datta (1948). The Contribution of Modern Indian Philosophy to World Philosophy. Philosophical Review 57 (6):550-572.
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  14. A. Raghuramaraju (2012). Enduring Colonialism: Classical Presences and Modern Absences in Indian Philosophy. OUP India.
    This volume explores the relevance of classical texts and thought-systems alongside contemporary philosophical consciousness. It also evaluates the absences in contemporary thought patterns and the new epistemes relevant to the Indian subcontinent. The book discusses the present lack of original philosophical discourse in the context of South Asia, especially India. Raghuramaraju investigates the reasons for the decline of traditional philosophical schools and Sanskritic studies in the subcontinent.
    No categories
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  15. Karel Werner & Oliver Leaman (1995). Review of Thirty-Five Oriental Philosophers, by Diane Collinson and Robert Wilkinson ; Essays on Indian Philosophy Traditional and Modern, by J. N. Mohanty ; and Gates of Light , by Rabbi Joseph Gikatilla. [REVIEW] Asian Philosophy 5 (2):209-213.
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  16. S. K. Chakraborty (1996). Book Reviews : J.N. Mohanty, Essays on Indian Philosophy: Traditional and Modern. Delhi: Oxford University Press, 1995, Xxxvii + 347 Pp. Price Not Stated. [REVIEW] Journal of Human Values 2 (2):194-197.
    No categories
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  17. Raghuramaraju (2009). Enduring Colonialism: Classical Presences and Modern Absences in Indian Philosophy. OUP India.
    This book explores the absence of original philosophical episteme in South Asia especially India. It also investigates the reasons for decline in traditional philosophical schools and Sanskritic studies in the subcontinent.
    No categories
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  18.  1
    J. Shaw, Vijay Bharadwaha, S. Bhatt, W. Hudson & Ian Netton (1992). Review of Form and Validity in Indian Logic, by Vijay Bharadwaja ; The Word and The World: India's Contribution to the Study of Language, by Bimal Krishna Matilal ;The Basic Ways of Knowing, by Govardhan P. Bhatt ; The Quest for Man, Ed. J. Van Nispen and D. Tiemersma ; Muslim-Christian Encounters: Perceptions and Misperceptions, by William Montgomery Watt ; Socrates in Mediaeval Arabic Literature, by Ilai Alon, in Islamic Philosophy, Theology and Science, Texts and Studies, Vol. 10 ; Tsung-Mi and the Sinification of Buddhism, by Peter N. Gregory ; Modern Civilization: A Crisis of Fragmentation, by S. C. Malik ; and Nature in Asian Traditions of Thought: Essays in Environmental Philosophy, Ed. J. Baird Callicott and Roger T. Ames. [REVIEW] Asian Philosophy 2 (2):187-210.
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  19.  10
    Balaganapathi Devarakonda (2009). Limitations and Alternatives: Understanding Indian Philosophy. Calicut University Research Journal, ISSN No. 09723348 (1):47-58.
    This paper attempts to articulate certain inadequacies that are involved in the traditional way of categorizing Indian philosophy and explores alternative approaches, some of which otherwise are not explicitly seen in the treatises of the history of Indian Philosophies. By categorization, I mean, classifying Indian philosophy into two streams, which are traditionally called as astica and nastica or orthodox and heterodox systems. Further, these different schools in the astica Darsanas and nastica Darsanas are usually numbered (...)
    Translate
      Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  20.  8
    Desh Raj Sirswal, Dr. B.R. Ambedkar: A Modern Indian Philosopher.
    Dr. B.R. Ambedkar is one of the names that changed social order of the age-old tradition of suppression and humiliation. He was an intellectual, scholar & statesman and contributed greatly in the nation building. He led a number of movements to emancipate the downtrodden masses and to secure human rights to millions of depressed classes. He has left an indelible imprint through his immense contribution in framing the modern Constitution of free India. He stands as a symbol of struggle (...)
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  21.  42
    Andrew J. Nicholson (2010). Unifying Hinduism: Philosophy and Identity in Indian Intellectual History. Columbia University Press.
    Some postcolonial theorists argue that the idea of a single system of belief known as "Hinduism" is a creation of nineteenth-century British imperialists. Andrew J. Nicholson introduces another perspective: although a unified Hindu identity is not as ancient as some Hindus claim, it has its roots in innovations within South Asian philosophy from the fourteenth to seventeenth centuries. During this time, thinkers treated the philosophies of Vedanta, Samkhya, and Yoga, along with the worshippers of Visnu, Siva, and Sakti, (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   4 citations  
  22. Desh Raj Sirswal (2013). Jyotiba Phule : A Modern Indian Philosopher. Darshan: International Refereed Quarterly Research Journal for Philosophy and Yoga 1 (3-4):28-36.
    JOTIRAO GOVINDRAO PHULE occupies a unique position among the social reformers of Maharashtra in the nineteenth century. While other reformers concentrated more on reforming the social institutions of family and marriage with special emphasis on the status and right of women, Jotirao Phule revolted against the unjust caste system under which millions of people had suffered for centuries and developed a critique of Indian social order and Hinduism. During this period, number of social and political thinkers started movement against (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  23.  1
    Harsha V. Dehejia (2000). Despair and Modernity: Reflections From Modern Indian Painting. Motilal Banarasidass Publishers.
    Dehejia has tried to create a place within the main frame of culture and philosophy of Indian art for a legitimate analytic theory called despair.
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  24.  4
    Nirbhai Singh (2008). Rethinking Indian Philosophy. Proceedings of the Xxii World Congress of Philosophy 45:329-336.
    Today India is being crushed between two millstones of internal disintegration of man’s personality and society vis-à-vis globalization. India’s spiritual culture and multiple human cultures are being crushed. Indian culture is a lived experience of the inner self. We are to develop an integrative world-view of Indian Philosophy. We are concerned with Indian Philosophy in 2008. Philosopher analyzes ideology for restoring justice in society. He creates values, judgement and tries to translate them in praxis. His (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  25. Bina Gupta (2011). An Introduction to Indian Philosophy: Perspectives on Reality, Knowledge, and Freedom. Routledge.
    An Introduction to Indian Philosophy offers a profound yet accessible survey of the development of India’s philosophical tradition. Beginning with the formation of Brahmanical, Jaina, Materialist, and Buddhist traditions, Bina Gupta guides the reader through the classical schools of Indian thought, culminating in a look at how these traditions inform Indian philosophy and society in modern times. Offering translations from source texts and clear explanations of philosophical terms, this text provides a rigorous overview of (...)
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   2 citations  
  26.  26
    Rajendra Prasad (2008). A Conceptual-Analytic Study of Classical Indian Philosophy of Morals. Jointly Published by Centre for Studies in Civilization and Concept Pub. Co. For the Project of History of Indian Science, Philosophy, and Culture.
    Using recontructive ideas available in classical Indian original works, this book makes a departure in the style of modern writings on Indian moral philosophy.
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  27. Purushottama Bilimoria (ed.) (2017). Routledge History of Indian Philosophy. Routledge.
    The _History of Indian Philosophy_ is a comprehensive and authoritative examination of the movements and thinkers that have shaped Indian philosophy over the last three thousand years. An outstanding team of international contributors provide over sixty accessible entries, organised into three clear parts: Knowledge, Context, Concepts Philosophical Traditions Engaging and Encounters: Modern and Postmodern. This outstanding collection is essential reading for students of Indian philosophy, and will also be of interest to those seeking to (...)
    No categories
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  28. Bina Gupta (2011). An Introduction to Indian Philosophy: Perspectives on Reality, Knowledge, and Freedom. Routledge.
    _An Introduction to Indian Philosophy_ offers a profound yet accessible survey of the development of India’s philosophical tradition. Beginning with the formation of Brahmanical, Jaina, Materialist, and Buddhist traditions, Bina Gupta guides the reader through the classical schools of Indian thought, culminating in a look at how these traditions inform Indian philosophy and society in modern times. Offering translations from source texts and clear explanations of philosophical terms, this text provides a rigorous overview of (...) philosophical contributions to epistemology, metaphysics, philosophy of language, and ethics. This is a must-read for anyone seeking a reliable and illuminating introduction to Indian philosophy. (shrink)
    No categories
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  29. Joseph Waligore (1995). The Joy of Torture: Hellenistic and Indian Philosophy on the Doctrine That the Sage is Always Happy Even If Tortured. Dissertation, Syracuse University
    Prominent in Hellenistic philosophy is the debate over whether the sage is really always happy even if tortured. This doctrine that the tortured sage is happy is important because the Hellenistic philosophers used this case to debate the power of moral virtue in a person's life. Modern pain research shows that it is indeed possible to be happy while being tortured because pain is not purely a sensory phenomenon. Based on this modern research, I investigate the positions (...)
    No categories
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  30.  23
    Joseph S. Alter (2004). Yoga in Modern India: The Body Between Science and Philosophy. Princeton University Press.
    Yoga has come to be an icon of Indian culture and civilization, and it is widely regarded as being timeless and unchanging. Based on extensive ethnographic research and an analysis of both ancient and modern texts, Yoga in Modern India challenges this popular view by examining the history of yoga, focusing on its emergence in modern India and its dramatically changing form and significance in the twentieth century. Joseph Alter argues that yoga's transformation into a popular (...)
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  31. Kevin Burns (2006). Eastern Philosophy: The Greatest Thinkers and Sages From Ancient to Modern Times. Enchanted Lion Books.
    A clear and engaging presentation of history's most influential Eastern thinkers Eastern Philosophy provides a detailed but accessible analysis of the work of nearly sixty thinkers from all of the major Eastern philosophical traditions, from the earliest times to the present day. Covering systems, schools, and individuals, Eastern Philosophy presents founder figures such as Zoroaster and Mohammed as well as modern thinkers such as Nishida Kitaro, perhaps the preeminent figure within modern Japanese philosophy. From Buddhism (...)
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  32. Daya Krishna (2002). Developments in Indian Philosophy From Eighteenth Century Onwards: Classical and Western. Distributed by Motilal Banarsidass.
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  33.  12
    John Vattanky (2007). Philosophy of Indian Logic From a Comparative Perspective. The Proceedings of the Twenty-First World Congress of Philosophy 7:179-183.
    One of the classical systems of Indian Philosophy is specially concerned with the problems of logic c This system is called Nyaya which has a long history of about two thousand years. In the extent of the literature it has produced and in the depth of the philosophical problems it discusses, it is of considerable interest and importance. However, the spirit of pure rationality in which Nyaya discusses these problems and the techniques it makes use of in handling (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  34.  2
    Aria Laskin (2013). The Indian Psychological Association, the Birth of the Modern Discipline and “the Destiny of One Nation”, 1905–1947. Modern Intellectual History 10 (2):415-436.
    In the age of decolonization, Indian psychology engaged with and nationalized itself within global networks of ideas. While psychology was eventually applied by public intellectuals in explicitly political arenas, this essay focuses on the initial mobilization of the discipline's early Indian experts, led by the founder of the Indian Psychological Association, Narendranath Sengupta. Although modern critics have harshly judged early Indian psychologists for blind appropriation of European concepts, an analysis of the networks through which the (...)
    No categories
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  35.  3
    Harold Coward (1990). Derrida and Indian Philosophy. State University of New York Press.
    Coward (religious studies, U. of Calgary) explores the similarities and differences between the language theories of modern French philosopher Jacques Derrida and several traditional Indian schools of thought.
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   1 citation  
  36.  13
    Dominik Wujastyk (2005). Change and Creativity in Early Modern Indian Medical Thought. Journal of Indian Philosophy 33 (1):95-118.
    Direct download (7 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   1 citation  
  37. Jonardon Ganeri (2014). The Lost Age of Reason: Philosophy in Early Modern India 1450-1700. Oxford University Press Uk.
    Jonardon Ganeri tells the story of a fascinating period in intellectual history, when Indian philosophy moved into the modern era. Philosophers no longer defer to ancient authorities, but draw upon their insights to seek a true understanding of knowledge, self, and reality. This missing chapter in the development of modernity can at last be read.
    No categories
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  38. Andrew J. Nicholson (2013). Unifying Hinduism: Philosophy and Identity in Indian Intellectual History. Cup.
    Some postcolonial theorists argue that the idea of a single system of belief known as "Hinduism" is a creation of nineteenth-century British imperialists. Andrew J. Nicholson introduces another perspective: although a unified Hindu identity is not as ancient as some Hindus claim, it has its roots in innovations within South Asian philosophy from the fourteenth to seventeenth centuries. During this time, thinkers treated the philosophies of Vedanta, Samkhya, and Yoga, along with the worshippers of Visnu, Siva, and Sakti, as (...)
    No categories
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  39. Sanjay Palshikar (2016). Evil and the Philosophy of Retribution: Modern Commentaries on the Bhagavad-Gita. Routledge India.
    What is ‘evil’? What are the ways of overcoming this destructive and morally recalcitrant phenomenon? To what extent is the use of punitive violence tenable? _Evil and the Philosophy of Retribution _compares the responses of three modern Indian commentators on the Bhagavad-Gita — Aurobindo Ghose, Bal Gangadhar Tilak and Mahatma Gandhi. The book reveals that some of the central themes in the Bhagavad-Gita were transformed by these intellectuals into categories of modern socio-political thought by reclaiming them (...)
    No categories
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  40.  10
    Probal Dasgupta (1981). Modern Indian Work at the Logic-Linguistics Boundary. Journal of Indian Philosophy 9 (3):217-225.
  41. Amita Chatterjee (2007). Indian Philosophy and Cognitive Science. In Manjulika Ghosh (ed.), Musings on Philosophy: Perennial and Modern. Sundeep Prakashan 131.
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  42. Sabyasachi Bhattacharya (ed.) (2007). Development of Modern Indian Thought and the Social Sciences. Oxford University Press.
    This important volume provides an overview of the history of social, economic, and political thought prior to the development of disciplinary categories in social sciences. It contextualizes the thought movements in the matrix of pre-modern intellectual traditions as well as the long-range history of society, polity, and economy in modern India. Thematically organized into five sections, the first part examines the evolution of economic thinking in modern India. The next section deals with the discourse of social reform, (...)
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  43.  43
    Peter R. Anstey & Alberto Vanzo (forthcoming). Early Modern Experimental Philosophy. In Justin Sytsma & Wesley Buckwalter (eds.), A Companion to Experimental Philosophy. Blackwell
    In the mid-seventeenth century a movement of self-styled experimental philosophers emerged in Britain. Originating in the discipline of natural philosophy amongst Fellows of the fledgling Royal Society of London, it soon spread to medicine and by the eighteenth century had impacted moral and political philosophy and even aesthetics. Early modern experimental philosophers gave epistemic priority to observation and experiment over theorising and speculation. They decried the use of hypotheses and system-building without recourse to experiment and, in some (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  44.  38
    Joseph Kaipayil (1995). The Epistemology of Comparative Philosophy: A Critique with Reference to P.T. Raju's Views. Rome: Centre for Indian and Inter-Religious Studies.
    Even as dismissive of pursuing Comparative Philosophy for achieving East-West synthesis in philosophy, the author maintains the need for “open philosophizing.” “Open philosophizing” is one characterized by dialogical openness to culturally diverse philosophical traditions and thought-patterns.
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   1 citation  
  45.  74
    Peter Anstey & Alberto Vanzo (2012). The Origins of Early Modern Experimental Philosophy. Intellectual History Review 22 (4):499-518.
    This paper argues that early modern experimental philosophy emerged as the dominant member of a pair of methods in natural philosophy, the speculative versus the experimental, and that this pairing derives from an overarching distinction between speculative and operative philosophy that can be ultimately traced back to Aristotle. The paper examines the traditional classification of natural philosophy as a speculative discipline from the Stagirite to the seventeenth century; medieval and early modern attempts to articulate (...)
    Direct download (8 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   4 citations  
  46. Vishwanath S. Naravane (1964). Modern Indian Thought. New York, Asia Pub. House.
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   1 citation  
  47. Arnabi Sen (2013). Modern Indian Thoughts on Material World. [Distributed by Gyan Books].
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  48.  66
    Kevin Connolly, Jennifer Corns, Nilanjan Das, Zachary Irving & Lu Teng, Mind and Attention in Indian Philosophy: Workshop Report.
    This report highlights and explores five questions that arose from the workshop on mind and attention in Indian philosophy at Harvard University, September 21st to 22nd, 2013: 1. How does the understanding of attention in Indian philosophy bear on contemporary western debates? 2. How can we train our attention, and what are the benefits of doing so? 3. Can meditation give us moral knowledge? 4. What can Indian philosophy tell us about how we perceive (...)
    Translate
      Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  49.  63
    Kevin Connolly, Jennifer Corns, Nilanjan Das, Zachary Irving & Lu Teng, Mind and Attention in Indian Philosophy: Workshop Report, Question Two.
    This is an excerpt from a report on the workshop on mind and attention in Indian philosophy at Harvard University, on September 21st and 22nd, 2013, written by Kevin Connolly, Jennifer Corns, Nilanjan Das, Zachary Irving, and Lu Teng, and available at http://networksensoryresearch.utoronto.ca/Events_%26_Discussion.html This portion of the report explores the question: How can we train our attention, and what are the benefits of doing so?
    Translate
      Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  50.  11
    J. B. Schneewind (1998). The Invention of Autonomy: A History of Modern Moral Philosophy. Cambridge University Press.
    This remarkable book is the most comprehensive study ever written of the history of moral philosophy in the seventeenth and eighteenth centuries. Its aim is to set Kant's still influential ethics in its historical context by showing in detail what the central questions in moral philosophy were for him and how he arrived at his own distinctive ethical views. The book is organised into four main sections, each exploring moral philosophy by discussing the work of many influential (...)
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   63 citations  
1 — 50 / 1000