Search results for 'Modern Indian Philosophy' (try it on Scholar)

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  1. Jitendranath Mohanty (1993). Essays on Indian Philosophy Traditional and Modern. Oxford University Press.score: 510.0
    Selected from the works of J. N. Mohanty over a forty-year period, these essays provide an intellectual biography of the man and insights into Eastern philosophy. Part I brings together various writings on problems in metaphysics, epistemology, and language, alongwith thoughtful treatments of notions such as experience, self consciousness, doubt, tradition, and modernity. Part II collects essays written during the exciting though turbulent years following India's independence, and they survey issues in social ethics, reform activities, and religion in the (...)
     
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  2. Balaganapathi Devarakonda (2012). Review of Indian Philosophy in English. Philosophical Papers:206-212.score: 477.0
    The present work is an attempt to show that ‘important and original philosophy was written in English, in India, by Indians’ from the late 19th c through the middle of 20th c. (xiv). In fact, it tells us that these works ‘sustained the Indian philosophical tradition and were creators of its modern avatar.’ (xiv) The authors of these works ‘pursued Indian philosophy in a language and format that could render it both accessible and acceptable to (...)
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  3. Satewan Parsram Kanal (1966). Naturalism in Modern Indian Philosophy. Delhi, Motilal Banarasidass.score: 468.0
     
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  4. Paul Brunton (1939). Indian Philosophy and Modern Culture. New York, E.P. Dutton & Co., Inc..score: 462.0
    Indian monism and western thought.--Indian idealist metaphysics and western culture.
     
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  5. A. Raghuramaraju (2009). Enduring Colonialism: Classical Presences and Modern Absences in Indian Philosophy. Oxford University Press.score: 462.0
    This volume explores three significant issues - absence, the consciousness of the contemporary, and new philosophical episteme - relevant to thought-systems in the Indian subcontinent. The author discusses the present lack of original philosophical discourse in the context of South Asia, especially India and investigates the reasons of such absences. It also investigates the reasons for decline in traditional philosophical schools and Sanskritic studies in the subcontinent. The book discusses the manner in which Indian thinkers from the times (...)
     
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  6. Peter Schreiner (1978). The Indianness of Modern Indian Philosophy as a Historical and Philosophical Problem. Philosophy East and West 28 (1):21-37.score: 459.0
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  7. Tanaji Acharya (1990). Relevance of Indian Philosophy to Modern Society. Distributor, Indo-Vision.score: 453.0
  8. V. M. Bedekar (ed.) (1979). Philosophy in the Fifteen Modern Indian Languages. Continental for the Council for the Marathi Encyclopaedia of Philosophy.score: 453.0
     
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  9. Narayan Kumar Chattopadhyay (1979). Indian Philosophy: Its Exposition in the Light of Vijñānabhikṣu's Bhāṣya and Yogavārittika: A Modern Approach. Sanskrit Pustak Bhandar.score: 453.0
     
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  10. Dhirendra Mohan Datta (1948). The Contribution of Modern Indian Philosophy to World Philosophy. Philosophical Review 57 (6):550-572.score: 450.0
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  11. S. K. Chakraborty (1996). Book Reviews : J.N. Mohanty, Essays on Indian Philosophy: Traditional and Modern. Delhi: Oxford University Press, 1995, Xxxvii + 347 Pp. Price Not Stated. [REVIEW] Journal of Human Values 2 (2):194-197.score: 435.0
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  12. Balaganapathi Devarakonda (2009). Limitations and Alternatives: Understanding Indian Philosophy. Calicut University Research Journal, ISSN No. 09723348 (1):47-58.score: 381.0
    This paper attempts to articulate certain inadequacies that are involved in the traditional way of categorizing Indian philosophy and explores alternative approaches, some of which otherwise are not explicitly seen in the treatises of the history of Indian Philosophies. By categorization, I mean, classifying Indian philosophy into two streams, which are traditionally called as astica and nastica or orthodox and heterodox systems. Further, these different schools in the astica Darsanas and nastica Darsanas are usually numbered (...)
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  13. Andrew J. Nicholson (2010). Unifying Hinduism: Philosophy and Identity in Indian Intellectual History. Columbia University Press.score: 351.0
    Some postcolonial theorists argue that the idea of a single system of belief known as "Hinduism" is a creation of nineteenth-century British imperialists. Andrew J. Nicholson introduces another perspective: although a unified Hindu identity is not as ancient as some Hindus claim, it has its roots in innovations within South Asian philosophy from the fourteenth to seventeenth centuries. During this time, thinkers treated the philosophies of Vedanta, Samkhya, and Yoga, along with the worshippers of Visnu, Siva, and Sakti, as (...)
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  14. Desh Raj Sirswal (2013). Jyotiba Phule : A Modern Indian Philosopher. Darshan: International Refereed Quarterly Research Journal for Philosophy and Yoga 1 (3-4):28-36.score: 339.0
    JOTIRAO GOVINDRAO PHULE occupies a unique position among the social reformers of Maharashtra in the nineteenth century. While other reformers concentrated more on reforming the social institutions of family and marriage with special emphasis on the status and right of women, Jotirao Phule revolted against the unjust caste system under which millions of people had suffered for centuries and developed a critique of Indian social order and Hinduism. During this period, number of social and political thinkers started movement against (...)
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  15. Harsha V. Dehejia (2000). Despair and Modernity: Reflections From Modern Indian Painting. Motilal Banarasidass Publishers.score: 330.0
    Dehejia has tried to create a place within the main frame of culture and philosophy of Indian art for a legitimate analytic theory called despair.
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  16. Bina Gupta (2011). An Introduction to Indian Philosophy: Perspectives on Reality, Knowledge, and Freedom. Routledge.score: 315.0
    An Introduction to Indian Philosophy offers a profound yet accessible survey of the development of India’s philosophical tradition. Beginning with the formation of Brahmanical, Jaina, Materialist, and Buddhist traditions, Bina Gupta guides the reader through the classical schools of Indian thought, culminating in a look at how these traditions inform Indian philosophy and society in modern times. Offering translations from source texts and clear explanations of philosophical terms, this text provides a rigorous overview of (...)
     
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  17. Rajendra Prasad (2008). A Conceptual-Analytic Study of Classical Indian Philosophy of Morals. Jointly Published by Centre for Studies in Civilization and Concept Pub. Co. For the Project of History of Indian Science, Philosophy, and Culture.score: 309.0
    Using recontructive ideas available in classical Indian original works, this book makes a departure in the style of modern writings on Indian moral philosophy.
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  18. Nirbhai Singh (2008). Rethinking Indian Philosophy. Proceedings of the Xxii World Congress of Philosophy 45:329-336.score: 306.0
    Today India is being crushed between two millstones of internal disintegration of man’s personality and society vis-à-vis globalization. India’s spiritual culture and multiple human cultures are being crushed. Indian culture is a lived experience of the inner self. We are to develop an integrative world-view of Indian Philosophy. We are concerned with Indian Philosophy in 2008. Philosopher analyzes ideology for restoring justice in society. He creates values, judgement and tries to translate them in praxis. His (...)
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  19. Joseph S. Alter (2004). Yoga in Modern India: The Body Between Science and Philosophy. Princeton University Press.score: 288.0
    Yoga has come to be an icon of Indian culture and civilization, and it is widely regarded as being timeless and unchanging. Based on extensive ethnographic research and an analysis of both ancient and modern texts, Yoga in Modern India challenges this popular view by examining the history of yoga, focusing on its emergence in modern India and its dramatically changing form and significance in the twentieth century. Joseph Alter argues that yoga's transformation into a popular (...)
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  20. Kevin Burns (2006). Eastern Philosophy: The Greatest Thinkers and Sages From Ancient to Modern Times. Enchanted Lion Books.score: 285.0
    A clear and engaging presentation of history's most influential Eastern thinkers Eastern Philosophy provides a detailed but accessible analysis of the work of nearly sixty thinkers from all of the major Eastern philosophical traditions, from the earliest times to the present day. Covering systems, schools, and individuals, Eastern Philosophy presents founder figures such as Zoroaster and Mohammed as well as modern thinkers such as Nishida Kitaro, perhaps the preeminent figure within modern Japanese philosophy. From Buddhism (...)
     
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  21. Daya Krishna (2002). Developments in Indian Philosophy From Eighteenth Century Onwards: Classical and Western. Distributed by Motilal Banarsidass.score: 282.0
     
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  22. John Vattanky (2007). Philosophy of Indian Logic From a Comparative Perspective. The Proceedings of the Twenty-First World Congress of Philosophy 7:179-183.score: 276.0
    One of the classical systems of Indian Philosophy is specially concerned with the problems of logic c This system is called Nyaya which has a long history of about two thousand years. In the extent of the literature it has produced and in the depth of the philosophical problems it discusses, it is of considerable interest and importance. However, the spirit of pure rationality in which Nyaya discusses these problems and the techniques it makes use of in handling (...)
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  23. Aria Laskin (2013). The Indian Psychological Association, the Birth of the Modern Discipline and “the Destiny of One Nation”, 1905–1947. Modern Intellectual History 10 (2):415-436.score: 276.0
    In the age of decolonization, Indian psychology engaged with and nationalized itself within global networks of ideas. While psychology was eventually applied by public intellectuals in explicitly political arenas, this essay focuses on the initial mobilization of the discipline's early Indian experts, led by the founder of the Indian Psychological Association, Narendranath Sengupta. Although modern critics have harshly judged early Indian psychologists for blind appropriation of European concepts, an analysis of the networks through which the (...)
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  24. Probal Dasgupta (1981). Modern Indian Work at the Logic-Linguistics Boundary. Journal of Indian Philosophy 9 (3):217-225.score: 252.0
  25. Dominik Wujastyk (2005). Change and Creativity in Early Modern Indian Medical Thought. Journal of Indian Philosophy 33 (1):95-118.score: 252.0
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  26. Harold Coward (1990). Derrida and Indian Philosophy. State University of New York Press.score: 246.0
    Coward (religious studies, U. of Calgary) explores the similarities and differences between the language theories of modern French philosopher Jacques Derrida and several traditional Indian schools of thought.
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  27. Amita Chatterjee (2007). Indian Philosophy and Cognitive Science. In Manjulika Ghosh (ed.), Musings on Philosophy: Perennial and Modern. Sundeep Prakashan. 131.score: 246.0
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  28. Sabyasachi Bhattacharya (ed.) (2007). Development of Modern Indian Thought and the Social Sciences. Oxford University Press.score: 237.0
    This important volume provides an overview of the history of social, economic, and political thought prior to the development of disciplinary categories in social sciences. It contextualizes the thought movements in the matrix of pre-modern intellectual traditions as well as the long-range history of society, polity, and economy in modern India. Thematically organized into five sections, the first part examines the evolution of economic thinking in modern India. The next section deals with the discourse of social reform, (...)
     
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  29. Joseph Kaipayil (1995). The Epistemology of Comparative Philosophy: A Critique with Reference to P.T. Raju's Views. Rome: Centre for Indian and Inter-Religious Studies.score: 234.0
    Even as dismissive of pursuing Comparative Philosophy for achieving East-West synthesis in philosophy, the author maintains the need for “open philosophizing.” “Open philosophizing” is one characterized by dialogical openness to culturally diverse philosophical traditions and thought-patterns.
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  30. Vishwanath S. [from old catalog] Naravane (1964). Modern Indian Thought. New York, Asia Pub. House.score: 228.0
     
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  31. Arnabi Sen (2013). Modern Indian Thoughts on Material World. [Distributed by Gyan Books].score: 228.0
     
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  32. Kevin Connolly, Jennifer Corns, Nilanjan Das, Zachary Irving & Lu Teng, Mind and Attention in Indian Philosophy: Workshop Report, Question Two.score: 224.0
    This is an excerpt from a report on the workshop on mind and attention in Indian philosophy at Harvard University, on September 21st and 22nd, 2013, written by Kevin Connolly, Jennifer Corns, Nilanjan Das, Zachary Irving, and Lu Teng, and available at http://networksensoryresearch.utoronto.ca/Events_%26_Discussion.html This portion of the report explores the question: How can we train our attention, and what are the benefits of doing so?
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  33. Kevin Connolly, Jennifer Corns, Nilanjan Das, Zachary Irving & Lu Teng, Mind and Attention in Indian Philosophy: Workshop Report.score: 224.0
    This report highlights and explores five questions that arose from the workshop on mind and attention in Indian philosophy at Harvard University, September 21st to 22nd, 2013: 1. How does the understanding of attention in Indian philosophy bear on contemporary western debates? 2. How can we train our attention, and what are the benefits of doing so? 3. Can meditation give us moral knowledge? 4. What can Indian philosophy tell us about how we perceive (...)
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  34. Kevin Connolly, Jennifer Corns, Nilanjan Das, Zachary Irving & Lu Teng, Mind and Attention in Indian Philosophy: Workshop Report, Question Four.score: 224.0
    This is an excerpt from a report on the workshop on mind and attention in Indian philosophy at Harvard University, on September 21st and 22nd, 2013, written by Kevin Connolly, Jennifer Corns, Nilanjan Das, Zachary Irving, and Lu Teng, and available at http://networksensoryresearch.utoronto.ca/Events_%26_Discussion.html This portion of the report explores the question: What can Indian philosophy tell us about how we perceive the world?
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  35. Kevin Connolly, Mind and Attention in Indian Philosophy: Workshop Report, Question Five.score: 224.0
    This is an excerpt from a report on the workshop on mind and attention in Indian philosophy at Harvard University, on September 21st and 22nd, 2013, written by Kevin Connolly, Jennifer Corns, Nilanjan Das, Zachary Irving, and Lu Teng, and available at http://networksensoryresearch.utoronto.ca/Events_%26_Discussion.html This portion of the report explores the question: Are there cross-cultural philosophical themes?
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  36. Kevin Connolly, Jennifer Corns, Nilanjan Das, Zachary Irving & Lu Teng, Mind and Attention in Indian Philosophy: Workshop Report, Question One.score: 224.0
    This is an excerpt from a report on the workshop on mind and attention in Indian philosophy at Harvard University, on September 21st and 22nd, 2013, written by Kevin Connolly, Jennifer Corns, Nilanjan Das, Zachary Irving, and Lu Teng, and available at http://networksensoryresearch.utoronto.ca/Events_%26_Discussion.html This part of the report explores the question: How does the understanding of attention in Indian philosophy bear on contemporary western debates?
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  37. Kevin Connolly, Jennifer Corns, Nilanjan Das, Zachary Irving & Lu Teng, Mind and Attention in Indian Philosophy: Workshop Report, Question Three.score: 224.0
    This is an excerpt from a report on the workshop on mind and attention in Indian philosophy at Harvard University, on September 21st and 22nd, 2013, written by Kevin Connolly, Jennifer Corns, Nilanjan Das, Zachary Irving, and Lu Teng, and available at http://networksensoryresearch.utoronto.ca/Events_%26_Discussion.html This portion of the report explores the question: Can meditation give us moral knowledge?
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  38. Peter Anstey & Alberto Vanzo (2012). The Origins of Early Modern Experimental Philosophy. Intellectual History Review 22 (4):499-518.score: 224.0
    This paper argues that early modern experimental philosophy emerged as the dominant member of a pair of methods in natural philosophy, the speculative versus the experimental, and that this pairing derives from an overarching distinction between speculative and operative philosophy that can be ultimately traced back to Aristotle. The paper examines the traditional classification of natural philosophy as a speculative discipline from the Stagirite to the seventeenth century; medieval and early modern attempts to articulate (...)
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  39. Desh Raj Sirswal (ed.) (2013). Contemporary Indian Philosophy. CPPIS Pehowa.score: 224.0
    Contemporary Indian Philosophy is related to contemporary Indian thinkers and contains the proceedings of First Session of Society for Positive Philosophy and Interdisciplinary Studies (SPPIS) Haryana. It is neither easy nor impossible to translate into action all noble goals set forth by the eminent thinkers and scholars, but we might try to discuss and propagate their ideas. In this session all papers submitted electronically and selected abstracts have been published on a website especially develop for this (...)
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  40. Shyam Ranganathan (2007). Ethics and the History of Indian Philosophy. Motilal Banarsidass Publishers.score: 224.0
    Ethics and the History of Indian Philosophy (Motilal Banarsidass 2007). Regretfully, it is not an uncommon view in orthodox Indology that Indian philosophers were not interested in ethics. This claim belies the fact that Indian philosophical schools were generally interested in the practical consequences of beliefs and actions. The most popular symptom of this concern is the doctrine of karma, according to which the consequences of actions have an evaluative valence. Ethics and the History of (...) Philosophy argues that the orthodox view in Indology concerning Indian ethics is false. The first half the book deals with theoretical issues in studying ethics: defining moral terms, understanding the subject matter of ethics so as to transcend culturally specific substantive commitments and touches upon issues of cross-cultural hermeneutics and translation. The second half consists of a systematic explication of the moral philosophical aspects of nine major Indian philosophical schools. I argue that “dharma” in its various uses in Indian philosophy is always rationally treated as a moral term—even in so called “ontological” employments of the term as seen in Buddhism and Jainism. In understanding “dharma” in this manner, the Indian philosophical tradition is replete with different versions of moral realism that fit tidily with other philosophical commitments of Indian philosophers. Pains are taken to show the breath of moral philosophical disagreement in this tradition. On a comparative note, some Indian moral philosophy resembles realist approaches of the Western tradition (such as the Non-natural realism of Neo-Platonism, or the Naturalism of Utilitarianism). Out of the major Indian philosophical schools, a slim minority are shown to be committed to moral irrealism while some are shown to regard their entire philosophical orientation as firmly planted within moral philosophy (such as Jainism, Buddhism, Purva Mimamsa and Yoga). In response to those who would argue that what Indian philosophers meant by “dharma” is very different from what moral philosophers in the West have meant by “ethical” or “good,” I argue that this is as vacuous as noting that Utilitarians have a different conception of the good from Deontologists. If philosophy is concerned with theoretical debate, as I argue it is, philosophical terms function to articulate such disagreements. The various seemingly desperate uses of “dharma” in the Indian tradition are no longer confusing or disorderly when we understand the theoretico-philosophical function of this term in Indian philosophical disputes. (shrink)
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  41. Thomas M. Norton-Smith (2010). The Dance of Person and Place: One Interpretation of American Indian Philosophy. State University of New York Press.score: 224.0
    Common themes in American Indian philosophy -- First introductions -- Common themes : a first look -- Constructing an actual American Indian world -- NelsonGoodman's constructivism -- Setting the stage -- Fact, fiction, and feeders -- Ontological pluralism -- True versions and well-made worlds -- Nonlinguistic versions and the advancement of understanding -- True versions and cultural bias -- Constructive realism : variations on a theme by Goodman -- True versions and cultural bias -- An American (...) well-made actual world -- Relatedness, native knowledge, and ultimate acceptability -- Native knowledge and relatedness as a world ordering principle -- Native knowledge and truth -- Native knowledge and verification -- Native knowledge and ultimate acceptability -- An expansive conception of persons -- A western conception of persons -- Native conceptions of animate beings and persons -- An American Indian expansive conception of persons -- The semantic potency of performance -- Opening reflections and reminders about performances -- Symbols and their performance -- The Shawnee naming ceremony -- Gifting as a world constructing performance -- Closing remarks about the semantic potency of performances -- Circularity as a world ordering principle -- Goodman briefly revisited -- Time, events, and history or space, place, and nature? -- Circularity as a world ordering principle -- Circularity and sacred places -- Closing remarks about circularity as a world ordering principle -- The dance of person and place -- American Indian philosophy as a dance of person and place -- Consequences, speculations, and closing reflections. (shrink)
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  42. Herbert Wallace Schneider (1966). Modern Indian Thought. Journal of the History of Philosophy 4 (1):88-88.score: 219.0
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  43. Maurice R. Holloway (1963). "Indian Philosophy: A Critical Survey," by Chandradhar Sharma. Modern Schoolman 41 (1):97-97.score: 219.0
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  44. Gnanapragasam Ignatius (1967). "Doctrine and Argument in Indian Philosophy," by Ninian Smart. Modern Schoolman 44 (3):296-298.score: 219.0
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  45. Michael L. Morgan & Peter Eli Gordon (eds.) (2007). The Cambridge Companion to Modern Jewish Philosophy. Cambrige University Press.score: 216.0
    Modern Jewish philosophy emerged in the seventeenth century, with the impact of the new science and modern philosophy on thinkers who were reflecting upon the nature of Judaism and Jewish life. This collection of new essays examines the work of several of the most important of these figures, from the seventeenth to the late-twentieth centuries, and addresses themes central to the tradition of modern Jewish philosophy: language and revelation, autonomy and authority, the problem of (...)
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  46. Bhuvan Chandel (2007). Social Philosophy for the 21st Century in the Indian Context. In Manjulika Ghosh (ed.), Musings on Philosophy: Perennial and Modern. Sundeep Prakashan. 15.score: 216.0
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  47. Jenny Teichman & Graham White (eds.) (1995). An Introduction to Modern European Philosophy. St. Martin's Press.score: 216.0
    An Introduction to Modern European Philosophy , contains scholarly but accessible essays by nine British academics on Hegel, Schopenhauer, Kierkegaard, Marx, Nietzsche, Husserl, Heidegger, Sartre, Simone de Beauvoir, Maritain, Hannah Arendt, Habermas, Foucault, and the 'Events' of 1968. Written for English-speaking readers, it describes the varied traditions within 19th- and 20th-century European philosophy, reflecting the dynamism and plurality within the European tradition and presenting opposing points of view. It deals with both French and German philosophers, plus Kierkegaard, (...)
     
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  48. Claus Oetke (2009). Some Issues of Scholarly Exegesis (in Indian Philosophy). Journal of Indian Philosophy 37 (5):415-497.score: 208.0
    The article deals with some facets of the phenomenon of the underdetermination of meaning by (linguistic) data which are particularly relevant for textual exegesis in the historico-philological disciplines. The paper attempts to demonstrate that lack of relevant information is by no means the only important reason why certain issues of interpretation cannot be definitely settled by means of traditional philological methods but that the objective nonexistence of pertinent data is equally significant. It is claimed that the phenomenon of objective under-determination (...)
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  49. Balaganapathi Devarakonda (2008-09). The Argumentative Tradition in Indian Philosophy. Journal of Philosophy, Culture and Traditions 5:173-186.score: 208.0
    A spirit of disintegration and disunity is conspicuous on the contemporary social, as well as philosophical scene. There is a celebration of fragments and differences. In such a scenario, no less than a person like Amartya Sen, an eminent economist and a Noble Laureate rose to the occasion and traced out the roots and the space for a democratic discourse that has been sustained in the Indian philosophical tradition. It is laudable that he opened up a discussion that will (...)
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  50. Michael Zank (2012). The Heteronomy of Modern Jewish Philosophy. Journal of Jewish Thought and Philosophy 20 (1):99-134.score: 208.0
    Abstract Proceeding from Jewish philosophy's origins in the convergence and divergence of Greek and Jewish thought and the resulting possibilities of construing Judaism and philosophy as heterogeneous or homogeneous, and ranging across the three major “ages“ or linguistic matrices of Jewish philosophizing (Hellenistic, Judeo-Arabic, and Germanic), the essay describes Jewish philosophy as an unresolvable entanglement in a dialectic of heteronomy and autonomy.
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