Search results for 'Modular' (try it on Scholar)

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  1. Peter Carruthers (2004). Practical Reasoning in a Modular Mind. Mind and Language 19 (3):259-278.score: 24.0
    This paper starts from an assumption defended in the author's previous work. This is that distinctivelyhuman flexible and creative theoretical thinking can be explained in terms of the interactions of a variety of modular systems, with the addition of just a few amodular components and dispositions. On the basis of that assumption it is argued that distinctively human practical reasoning, too, can be understood in modular terms. The upshot is that there is nothing in the human psyche that (...)
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  2. Phan Minh Dung & Phan Minh Thang (2009). Modular Argumentation for Modelling Legal Doctrines in Common Law of Contract. Artificial Intelligence and Law 17 (3):167-182.score: 24.0
    To create a programming environment for contract dispute resolution, we propose an extension of assumption-based argumentation into modular assumption-based argumentation in which different modules of argumentation representing different knowledge bases for reasoning about beliefs and facts and for representation and reasoning with the legal doctrines could be built and assembled together. A distinct novel feature of modular argumentation in compare with other modular logic-based systems like Prolog is that it allows references to different semantics in the same (...)
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  3. Phan Minh Dung & Giovanni Sartor (2011). The Modular Logic of Private International Law. Artificial Intelligence and Law 19 (2-3):233-261.score: 24.0
    We provide a logical analysis of private international law, a rather esoteric, but increasingly important, domain of the law. Private international law addresses overlaps and conflicts between legal systems by distributing cases between the authorities of such systems (jurisdiction) and establishing what rules these authorities have to apply to each case (choice of law). A formal model of the resulting interactions between legal systems is proposed based on modular argumentation. It is argued that this model may also be useful (...)
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  4. Bert Schroer (2013). Modular Localization and the Foundational Origin of Integrability. Foundations of Physics 43 (3):329-372.score: 24.0
    The main aim of this work is to relate integrability in QFT with a complete particle interpretation directly to the principle of causal localization, circumventing the standard method of finding sufficiently many conservation laws. Its precise conceptual-mathematical formulation as “modular localization” within the setting of local operator algebras also suggests novel ways of looking at general (non-integrable) QFTs which are not based on quantizing classical field theories.Conformal QFT, which is known to admit no particle interpretation, suggest the presence of (...)
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  5. Krystyna Mruczek-Nasieniewska (2010). The Varieties Defined by P - Compatible Identities of Modular Ortholattices. Studia Logica 95 (1/2):21 - 35.score: 24.0
    In the present paper we give syntactical and semantical characterization of the class of algebras defined by P-compatible identities of modular ortholattices. We also describe the lattice of some subvarieties of the variety MOL Ex defined by so called externally compatible identities of modular ortholattices.
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  6. Jonathan Pila (2013). Modular Ax–Lindemann–Weierstrass with Derivatives. Notre Dame Journal of Formal Logic 54 (3-4):553-565.score: 24.0
    In a recent paper I established an analogue of the Lindemann–Weierstrass part of Ax–Schanuel for the elliptic modular function. Here I extend this to include its first and second derivatives. A generalization is given that includes exponential and Weierstrass elliptic functions as well.
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  7. Tapani Hyttinen (2005). Locally Modular Geometries in Homogeneous Structures. Mathematical Logic Quarterly 51 (3):291.score: 21.0
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  8. Xiaohong Xu (2013). Modular Genetic Control of Innate Behaviors. Bioessays 35 (5):421-424.score: 21.0
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  9. Jesse J. Prinz (2006). Is the Mind Really Modular? In Robert J. Stainton (ed.), Contemporary Debates in Cognitive Science. Blackwell. 22--36.score: 20.0
    When Fodor titled his (1983) book the _Modularity of Mind_, he overstated his position. His actual view is that the mind divides into systems some of which are modular and others of which are not. The book would have been more aptly, if less provocatively, called _The Modularity of Low-Level Peripheral Systems_. High-level perception and cognitive systems are non-modular on Fodor’s theory. In recent years, modularity has found more zealous defenders, who claim that the entire mind divides into (...)
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  10. Dustin Stokes & Vincent Bergeron, Modular Architectures and Informational Encapsulation: A Dilemma.score: 20.0
    Amongst philosophers and cognitive scientists, modularity remains a popular choice for an architecture of the human mind, primarily because of the supposed explanatory value of this approach. Modular architectures can vary both with respect to the strength of the notion of modularity and the scope of the modularity of mind. We propose a dilemma for modular architectures, no matter how these architectures vary along these two dimensions. First, if a modular architecture commits to the informational encapsulation of (...)
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  11. Peter Carruthers (2006). The Case for Massively Modular Models of Mind. In Robert J. Stainton (ed.), Contemporary Debates in Cognitive Science. Blackwell.score: 20.0
    My charge in this chapter is to set out the positive case supporting massively modular models of the human mind.1 Unfortunately, there is no generally accepted understanding of what a massively modular model of the mind is. So at least some of our discussion will have to be terminological. I shall begin by laying out the range of things that can be meant by ‘modularity’. I shall then adopt a pair of strategies. One will be to distinguish some (...)
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  12. Axel Arturo Barceló Aspeitia, Ángeles Eraña & Robert Stainton (2010). The Contribution of Domain Specificity in the Highly Modular Mind. Minds and Machines 20 (1):19-27.score: 20.0
    Is there a notion of domain specificity which affords genuine insight in the context of the highly modular mind, i.e. a mind which has not only input modules, but also central ‘conceptual’ modules? Our answer to this question is no. The main argument is simple enough: we lay out some constraints that a theoretically useful notion of domain specificity, in the context of the highly modular mind, would need to meet. We then survey a host of accounts of (...)
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  13. A. J. Chien (1996). Why the Mind May Not Be Modular. Minds and Machines 6 (1):1-32.score: 20.0
    Fodor argued that in contrast to input systems which are informationally encapsulated, general intelligence is unencapsulated and hence non-modular; for this reason, he suggested, prospects for understanding it are not bright. It is argued that an additional property, primitive functionality, is required for non-modularity. A functionally primitive computational model for quantifier scoping, limited to some scoping influences, is then motivated, and an implementation described. It is argued that only such a model can be faithful to intuitive scope preferences. But (...)
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  14. Brian K. Hall (2003). Unlocking the Black Box Between Genotype and Phenotype: Cell Condensations as Morphogenetic (Modular) Units. [REVIEW] Biology and Philosophy 18 (2):219-247.score: 20.0
    Embryonic development and ontogeny occupy whatis often depicted as the black box betweengenes – the genotype – and the features(structures, functions, behaviors) of organisms– the phenotype; the phenotype is not merelya one-to-one readout of the genotype. Thegenes home, context, and locus of operation isthe cell. Initially, in ontogeny, that cell isthe single-celled zygote. As developmentensues, multicellular assemblages of like cells(modules) progressively organized as germlayers, embryonic fields, anlage,condensations, or blastemata, enable genes toplay their roles in development and evolution.As modules, condensations are (...)
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  15. Axel Barceló Aspeitia, Ángeles Eraña & Robert Stainton (2010). The Contribution of Domain Specificity in the Highly Modular Mind. Minds and Machines 20 (1):19-27.score: 20.0
    Is there a notion of domain specificity which affords genuine insight in the context of the highly modular mind, i.e. a mind which has not only input modules, but also central ‘conceptual’ modules? Our answer to this question is no. The main argument is simple enough: we lay out some constraints that a theoretically useful notion of domain specificity, in the context of the highly modular mind, would need to meet. We then survey a host of accounts of (...)
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  16. Keith Frankish (2002). Language, Consciousness, and Cross-Modular Thought. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 25 (6):685-686.score: 18.0
    Carruthers suggests that natural language, in the form of inner speech, may be the vehicle of conscious propositional thought, but he argues that its fundamental cognitive role is as the medium of cross-modular thinking, both conscious and nonconscious. I argue that there is no evidence for nonconscious cross-modular thinking and that the most plausible view is that cross-modular thinking, like conscious propositional thinking, occurs only in inner speech.
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  17. Tim P. German & Alan M. Leslie (2004). No (Social) Construction Without (Meta-)Representation: Modular Mechanisms as a Basis for the Capacity to Acquire an Understanding of Mind. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 27 (1):106-107.score: 18.0
    Theories that propose a modular basis for developing a “theory of mind” have no problem accommodating social interaction or social environment factors into either the learning process, or into the genotypes underlying the growth of the neurocognitive modules. Instead, they can offer models which constrain and hence explain the mechanisms through which variations in social interaction affect development. Cognitive models of both competence and performance are critical to evaluating the basis of correlations between variations in social interaction and performance (...)
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  18. Richard Samuels (2002). The Spatial Reorientation Data Do Not Support the Thesis That Language is the Medium of Cross-Modular Thought. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 25 (6):697-698.score: 18.0
    A central claim of the target article is that language is the medium of domain-general, cross-modular thought; and according to Carruthers, the main, direct evidence for this thesis comes from a series of fascinating studies on spatial reorientation. I argue that the these studies, in fact, provide us with no reason whatsoever to accept this cognitive conception of language.
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  19. Diego Vaggione (1996). Definability of Directly Indecomposable Congruence Modular Algebras. Studia Logica 57 (2-3):239 - 241.score: 18.0
    It is proved that the directly indecomposable algebras in a congruence modular equational class form a first-order class provided that fulfils some two natural assumptions.
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  20. David R. Gilbert & Paolo Maffezioli (forthcoming). Modular Sequent Calculi for Classical Modal Logics. Studia Logica:1-43.score: 18.0
    This paper develops sequent calculi for several classical modal logics. Utilizing a polymodal translation of the standard modal language, we are able to establish a base system for the minimal classical modal logic E from which we generate extensions (to include M, C, and N) in a modular manner. Our systems admit contraction and cut admissibility, and allow a systematic proof-search procedure of formal derivations.
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  21. Michael Kohlhase, Towards Mkm in the Large: Modular Representation and Scalable Software Architecture.score: 18.0
    MKM has been defined as the quest for technologies to manage mathematical knowledge. MKM “in the small” is well-studied, so the real problem is to scale up to large, highly interconnected corpora: “MKM in the large”. We contend that advances in two areas are needed to reach this goal. We need representation languages that support incremental processing of all primitive MKM operations, and we need software architectures and implementations that implement these operations scalably on large knowledge bases. We present instances (...)
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  22. Derek Bickerton (2002). Language in the Modular Mind? It’s a No-Brainer! Behavioral and Brain Sciences 25 (6):677-678.score: 18.0
    Although Carruthers’ proposals avoid some of the more obvious pitfalls that face analysts of the language-cognition relationship, they are needlessly complex and vitiated by his uncritical acceptance of a highly modular variety of evolutionary psychology. He pays insufficient attention both to the neural substrate of the processes he hypothesizes and to the evolutionary developments that gave rise to both language and human cognition.
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  23. James Loveys (1991). Abelian Groups with Modular Generic. Journal of Symbolic Logic 56 (1):250-259.score: 18.0
    Let G be a stable abelian group with regular modular generic. We show that either 1. there is a definable nongeneric K ≤ G such that G/K has definable connected component and so strongly regular generics, or 2. distinct elements of the division ring yielding the dependence relation are represented by subgroups of G × G realizing distinct strong types (when regarded as elements of G eq ). In the latter case one can choose almost 0-definable subgroups representing the (...)
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  24. Paul Kiparsky, A Modular Metrics for Folk Verse.score: 18.0
    Hayes & MacEachern’s (1998) study of quatrain stanzas in English folk songs was the first application of stochastic Optimality Theory to a large corpus of data.1 It remains the most extensive study of versification that OT has to offer, and the most careful and perceptive formal analysis of folk song meter in any framework. In a follow-up study, Hayes (2003) concludes that stress and meter — or more generally, the prosodic structure of language and verse — are governed by (...)
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  25. M. Reis (1997). A Modular Approach to the Grammar of Additive Particles: The Case of German Auch. Journal of Semantics 14 (3):237-309.score: 18.0
    In this paper we given a modular account of the grammar of additive particles. In doing this we take issue with the standard descriptions of focus particles, which are based on just one possible pattern: the particle preceding the main stressed constituent it relates to (its RC). Additive particles, however, occur in a second, equally unmarked pattern: the RC preceding the main stressed particle. Former accounts do not only miss this complementary distribution as to position and stress pattern relative (...)
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  26. Arnon Avron, Non-Deterministic Matrices and Modular Semantics of Rules.score: 18.0
    We show by way of example how one can provide in a lot of cases simple modular semantics for rules of inference, so that the semantics of a system is obtained by joining the semantics of its rules in the most straightforward way. Our main tool for this task is the use of finite Nmatrices, which are multi-valued structures in which the value assigned by a valuation to a complex formula can be chosen non-deterministically out of a certain nonempty (...)
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  27. Guangyu Chen, Hong-Ying Zhang, Chunming Xie, Gang Chen, Zhi-Jun Zhang, Gao-Jun Teng & Shi-Jiang Li (2013). Modular Reorganization of Brain Resting State Networks and its Independent Validation in Alzheimer's Disease Patients. Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 7.score: 18.0
    Previous studies have demonstrated disruption in structural and functional connectivity occurring in the Alzheimer’s Disease (AD). However, it is not known how these disruptions alter brain network reorganization. With the modular analysis method of graph theory, and datasets acquired by the resting-state functional connectivity MRI (R-fMRI) method, we investigated and compared the brain organization patterns between the AD group and the cognitively normal control (CN) group. Our main finding is that the largest homotopic module (defined as the insula module) (...)
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  28. Nguyen Duy Hung, Phan Minh Thang & Phan Minh Dung (2011). Modular Argumentation for Modelling Legal Doctrines of Performance Relief. Argument and Computation 1 (1):47-69.score: 18.0
    We present an argument-based formalism of contract dispute resolution following a modern view that the court would resolve a contract dispute by enforcing an interpretation of contract that reasonably represents the mutual intention of contract parties. Legal doctrines provide principles, rules and guidelines for the court to objectively arrive at such an interpretation. In this paper, we establish the appropriateness of the formalism by applying it to resolve disputes about performance relief with the legal doctrines of impossibility and frustration of (...)
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  29. A. Ritterbusch (1990). The Measure of Biological Age in Plant Modular Systems. Acta Biotheoretica 38 (2).score: 18.0
    Phytomorphology — if concerned with development — often concentrates on correlative changes of form and neglects the aspects of age, time and clock, although the plant's spatial and temporal organisation are intimately interconnected. Common age as measured in physical time by a physical process is compared to biological age as measured by a biological clock based on a biological process. A typical example for a biological clock on the organ level is, for example, a shoot. Its biological age is measured (...)
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  30. Fabian Wagmister (2000). Modular Visions: Referents, Context and Strategies for Database Open Media Works. [REVIEW] AI and Society 14 (2):230-242.score: 18.0
    The processes of constructing meaning in digital database environments entail a paradigm shift from previous models of audio-visual communication. Media emerging from the Electro-mechanical era (film/TV/video) present fixed spatio-temporal linearity and material conditions which objectify and render passive viewer and process. The problematic aspects of cinematic communication were addressed by Latin American filmmakers of the “Third Cinema” movement. Their concerns and approach presaged and assisted an understanding of the radical redefinition of audio-visual communication possible with digital databases. The conceptual and (...)
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  31. Kleber Bez Birolo Candiotto (2011). Fundamentos epistemológicos da teoria modular da mente de Jerry A. Fodor. Trans/Form/Ação 31 (2):119-135.score: 18.0
    Este artigo é uma apresentação dos fundamentos da teoria modular desenvolvida por Jerry A. Fodor e uma reflexão sobre seus principais desafios. A noção de modularidade da mente de Fodor, por um lado, procura superar as insuficiências metodológicas e epistemológicas do associacionismo e do localizacionismo a respeito das explicações da estrutura e do funcionamento mental; por outro lado, é uma oposição à postura culturalista de Vygotsky, para o qual as funções superiores da mente, como a cognição, são produtos artificiais, (...)
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  32. Richard Samuels (2000). Massively Modular Minds: Evolutionary Psychology and Cognitive Architecture. In Peter Carruthers (ed.), Evolution and the Human Mind. Cambridge University Press. 13--46.score: 18.0
    What are the elements from which the human mind is composed? What structures make up our _cognitive architecture?_ One of the most recent and intriguing answers to this question comes from the newly emerging interdisciplinary field of evolutionary psychology. Evolutionary psychologists defend a _massively modular_ conception of mental architecture which views the mind –including those parts responsible for such ‘central processes’ as belief revision and reasoning— as composed largely or perhaps even entirely of innate, special-purpose computational mechanisms or ‘modules’ that (...)
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  33. Sang Ah Lee & Elizabeth S. Spelke, A Modular Geometric Mechanism for Reorientation in Children.score: 18.0
    Although disoriented young children reorient themselves in relation to the shape of the surrounding surface layout, cognitive accounts of this ability vary. The present paper tests three theories of reorientation: a snapshot theory based on visual image-matching computations, an adaptive combination theory proposing that diverse environmental cues to orientation are weighted according to their experienced reliability, and a modular theory centering on encapsulated computations of the shape of the extended surface layout. Seven experiments test these theories by manipulating four (...)
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  34. Alan L. Rector, Sebastian Brandt, Nick Drummond, Matthew Horridge, Colin Pulestin & Robert Stevens (2012). Engineering Use Cases for Modular Development of Ontologies in OWL - Applied Ontology - Volume 7, Number 2 / 2012 - IOS Press. [REVIEW] Applied Ontology 7 (2):113-132.score: 18.0
    This paper presents use cases for modular development of ontologies using the OWL imports mechanism. Many of the methods are inspired by work in modular development in software engineering. The approach is aimed at developers of large ontologies covering multiple subdomains that make use of OWL reasoners for inference. Such ontologies are common in biomedical sciences, but nothing in the paper is specific to biomedicine. There are four groups of use cases: (i) organisation and factoring of ontologies; (ii) (...)
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  35. Richard Samuels (2006). Is the Human Mind Massively Modular? In Rod Stainton (ed.), Contemporary Debates in Cognitive Science. Blackwell.score: 17.0
    Among the most pervasive and fundamental assumptions in cognitive science is that the human mind (or mind-brain) is a mechanism of some sort: a physical device com- posed of functionally specifiable subsystems. On this view, functional decomposition – the analysis of the overall system into functionally specifiable parts – becomes a central project for a science of the mind, and the resulting theories of cognitive archi- tecture essential to our understanding of human psychology.
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  36. Dan Sperber (2005). Modularity and Relevance: How Can a Massively Modular Mind Be Flexible and Context-Sensitive. In Peter Carruthers, Stephen Laurence & Stephen Stich (eds.), The Innate Mind: Structure and Content. Oup. 53.score: 17.0
  37. Scott Atran, Douglas I. Medin & Norbert Ross (2002). Thinking About Biology. Modular Constraints on Categorization and Reasoning in the Everyday Life of Americans, Maya, and Scientists. Mind and Society 3 (2):31-63.score: 17.0
    This essay explores the universal cognitive bases of biological taxonomy and taxonomic inference using cross-cultural experimental work with urbanized Americans and forest-dwelling Maya Indians. A universal, essentialist appreciation of generic species appears as the causal foundation for the taxonomic arrangement of biodiversity, and for inference about the distribution of causally-related properties that underlie biodiversity. Universal folkbiological taxonomy is domain-specific: its structure does not spontaneously or invariably arise in other cognitive domains, like substances, artifacts or persons. It is plausibly an innately-determined (...)
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  38. Daniel Pokrywczyński & Grant Malcolm (2014). Towards a Functional Approach to Modular Ontologies Using Institutions. Studia Logica 102 (1):117-143.score: 17.0
    We propose a functional view of ontologies that emphasises their role in determining answers to queries, irrespective of the formalism in which they are written. A notion of framework is introduced that captures the situation of a global language into which both an ontology language and a query language can be translated, in an abstract way. We then generalise existing notions of robustness from the literature, and relate these to interpolation properties that support modularisation of ontologies.
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  39. Rasmus Grønfeldt Winther (2005). Evolutionary Developmental Biology Meets Levels of Selection: Modular Integration or Competition, or Both? In Werner Callebaut & Diego Rasskin-Gutman (eds.), Modularity. Understanding the Development and Evolution of Natural Complex Systems. MIT Press.score: 16.0
  40. Olivier Darrigol (2008). The Modular Structure of Physical Theories. Synthese 162 (2):195 - 223.score: 16.0
    Any advanced theory of physics contains modules defined as essential components that are themselves theories with different domains of application. Different kinds of modules can be distinguished according to the way in which they fit in the symbolic and interpretive apparatus of a theory. The number and kind of the modules of a given theory vary as the theory evolves in time. The relative stability of modules and the variability of their insertion in other theories play a vital role in (...)
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  41. Jack C. Lyons (2001). Carving the Mind at its (Not Necessarily Modular) Joints. British Journal for the Philosophy of Science 52 (2):277-302.score: 16.0
    The cognitive neuropsychological understanding of a cognitive system is roughly that of a ‘mental organ’, which is independent of other systems, specializes in some cognitive task, and exhibits a certain kind of internal cohesiveness. This is all quite vague, and I try to make it more precise. A more precise understanding of cognitive systems will make it possible to articulate in some detail an alternative to the Fodorian doctrine of modularity (since not all cognitive systems are modules), but it will (...)
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  42. Robin Hanson, Logarithmic Market Scoring Rules for Modular Combinatorial Information Aggregation.score: 15.0
    In practice, scoring rules elicit good probability estimates from individuals, while betting markets elicit good consensus estimates from groups. Market scoring rules combine these features, eliciting estimates from individuals or groups, with groups costing no more than individuals. Regarding a bet on one event given another event, only logarithmic versions preserve the probability of the given event. Logarithmic versions also preserve the conditional probabilities of other events, and so preserve conditional independence relations. Given logarithmic rules that elicit relative probabilities of (...)
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  43. Lindley Darden (2002). Strategies for Discovering Mechanisms: Schema Instantiation, Modular Subassembly, Forward/Backward Chaining. Proceedings of the Philosophy of Science Association 2002 (3):S354-S365.score: 15.0
  44. James Blackmon, David Byrd, Robert C. Cummins, Pierre Poirier & Martin Roth (2005). Atomistic Learning in Non-Modular Systems. Philosophical Psychology 18 (3):313-325.score: 15.0
    We argue that atomistic learning?learning that requires training only on a novel item to be learned?is problematic for networks in which every weight is available for change in every learning situation. This is potentially significant because atomistic learning appears to be commonplace in humans and most non-human animals. We briefly review various proposed fixes, concluding that the most promising strategy to date involves training on pseudo-patterns along with novel items, a form of learning that is not strictly atomistic, but which (...)
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  45. Peter Carruthers (2006). Distinctively Human Thinking: Modular Precursors and Components. In , The Innate Mind: Culture and Cognition. New York: Oxford University Press New York. 69--88.score: 15.0
  46. Laura P. Hartman & Patricia H. Werhane (2009). A Modular Approach to Business Ethics Integration: At the Intersection of the Stand-Alone and the Integrated Approaches. [REVIEW] Journal of Business Ethics 90 (3):295 - 300.score: 15.0
    While no one seems to believe that business schools or their faculties bear entire responsibility for the ethical decision-making processes of their students, these same institutions do have some burden of accountability for educating students surrounding these skills. To that end, the standards promulgated by the Association to Advance Collegiate School of Business (AACSB), their global accrediting body, require that students learn ethics as part of a business degree. However, since the AACSB does not require the inclusion of a specific (...)
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  47. Tudor M. Baetu (2011). A Defense of Syntax-Based Gene Concepts in Postgenomics: Genes as Modular Subroutines in the Master Genomic Program. Philosophy of Science 78 (5):712-723.score: 15.0
  48. Pierre Poirier (2005). Atomistic Learning in Non-Modular Systems. Philosophical Psychology 18 (3):313-325.score: 15.0
    We argue that atomistic learning?learning that requires training only on a novel item to be learned?is problematic for networks in which every weight is available for change in every learning situation. This is potentially significant because atomistic learning appears to be commonplace in humans and most non-human animals. We briefly review various proposed fixes, concluding that the most promising strategy to date involves training on pseudo-patterns along with novel items, a form of learning that is not strictly atomistic, but which (...)
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  49. Satosi Watanabe (1961). A Model of Mind-Body Relation in Terms of Modular Logic. Synthese 13 (4):261 - 302.score: 15.0
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  50. Jerzy Kotas (1974). On Quantity of Logical Values in the Discussive D2 System and in Modular Logic. Studia Logica 33 (3):273 - 275.score: 15.0
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