Search results for 'Module' (try it on Scholar)

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  1.  13
    Alexandra D. Twyman & Nora S. Newcombe (2010). Five Reasons to Doubt the Existence of a Geometric Module. Cognitive Science 34 (7):1315-1356.
    It is frequently claimed that the human mind is organized in a modular fashion, a hypothesis linked historically, though not inevitably, to the claim that many aspects of the human mind are innately specified. A specific instance of this line of thought is the proposal of an innately specified geometric module for human reorientation. From a massive modularity position, the reorientation module would be one of a large number that organized the mind. From the core knowledge position, the (...)
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  2.  24
    Olubunmi A. Ogunrin, Temidayo O. Ogundiran & Clement Adebamowo (2013). Development and Pilot Testing of an Online Module for Ethics Education Based on the Nigerian National Code for Health Research Ethics. BMC Medical Ethics 14 (1):1-.
    Background: The formulation and implementation of national ethical regulations to protect research participants is fundamental to ethical conduct of research. Ethics education and capacity are inadequate in developing African countries. This study was designed to develop a module for online training in research ethics based on the Nigerian National Code of Health Research Ethics and assess its ease of use and reliability among biomedical researchers in Nigeria.MethodologyThis was a three-phased evaluation study. Phase one involved development of an online training (...)
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  3.  15
    Carol Rausch Albright (2000). The "God Module" and the Complexifying Brain. Zygon 35 (4):735-744.
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  4. Philip Gerrans (2002). The Theory of Mind Module in Evolutionary Psychology. Biology and Philosophy 17 (3):305-21.
    Evolutionary Psychology is based on the idea that the mind is a set of special purpose thinking devices or modules whose domain-specific structure is an adaptation to ancestral environments. The modular view of the mind is an uncontroversial description of the periphery of the mind, the input-output sensorimotor and affective subsystems. The novelty of EP is the claim that higher order cognitive processes also exhibit a modular structure. Autism is a primary case study here, interpreted as a developmental failure of (...)
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  5.  5
    Gerd Michelsen (2013). Sustainable Development as a Challenge for Undergraduate Students: The Module “Science Bears Responsibility” in the Leuphana Bachelor's Programme. Science and Engineering Ethics 19 (4):1505-1511.
    The Leuphana Semester at Leuphana University Lüneburg, together with the module “Science bears responsibility” demonstrate how innovative methods of teaching and learning can be combined with the topic of sustainable development and how new forms of university teaching can be introduced. With regard to module content, it has become apparent that, due to the complexity of the field of sustainability, a single discipline alone is unable to provide analyses and solutions. If teaching in higher education is to adequately (...)
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  6.  79
    Jason P. Lott (2005). Module Three: Vulnerable/Special Participant Populations. Developing World Bioethics 5 (1):30–54.
    ABSTRACT This module is designed to sensitise you to the special needs of participants who belong to populations that are more vulner.
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  7.  24
    Pamela Andanda (2005). Module Two: Informed Consent. Developing World Bioethics 5 (1):14–29.
    ABSTRACTThe objective of this module is to familiarise you with the concept of informed consent, its ethical basis, its elements, and typical problems that are encountered even by the most well intentioned researchers when trying to achieve genuine informed consent.
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  8.  5
    Lee Anne Peck & Nancy J. Matchett (2010). An Online Ethics Training Module for Public Relations Professionals. Public Relations Journal 4 (4).
    Researchers developed and tested an online training module with both experienced public relations professionals and newcomers to the field with the hopes of helping them sharpen and refine their ethical decision-making skills. The study found that although most testers reported the Web site was difficult to navigate and/or found the ethical content to be complex, the majority believed their ethical decision-making abilities were improved.
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  9.  16
    Benjamin Schneider & Udo Schüklenk (2005). Module Six: Special Issues. Developing World Bioethics 5 (1):92–108.
    The objective of this module is to cover ground that was not covered in-depth in any of the other modules, including: scientific misc.
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  10.  1
    L. Jacobson (2004). A Literature and Medicine Special Study Module Run by Academics in General Practice: Two Evaluations and the Lessons Learnt. Medical Humanities 30 (2):98-100.
    This paper describes the design, delivery and evaluation of a nine week special study module on literature and medicine for third year undergraduate medical students, by tutors from an academic department of general practice. Three weeks of taught seminars are followed by three weeks of one on one meetings between individual students and tutors, leading to a seminar led by, and based on, materials prepared by the student. The final three weeks of the course are dedicated to completion of (...)
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  11.  19
    Michael J. Selgelid (2005). Module Four: Standards of Care and Clinical Trials. Developing World Bioethics 5 (1):55–72.
    ABSTRACTThis module examines ethical debates about the level of care that should be provided to human research participants. Particular attention is placed on the question of what should be considered an ethically acceptable control arm. You will also learn what relevant international and domestic regulatory documents say about standards of care.
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  12.  3
    D. Kirklin (2000). Living with and Dying From Cancer: A Humanities Special Study Module. Medical Humanities 26 (1):51-54.
    We describe a humanities-based, special studies module exploring the impact of cancer on the lives of patients, families and professionals. Literature, film, art and drama provide third year medical undergraduates with vicarious experience of all of these perspectives in a format that has proved highly acceptable to students and tutors. The development, delivery, evaluation and evolution of this humanities-based course are described and we highlight some important elements of course organisation that emerged as being integral to its success.
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  13. Positionnement du Module Dans le Cursus (forthcoming). Description du Module. Comprendre.
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  14.  2
    Merryn Elizabeth Ekberg (2016). Exploring the Design, Delivery and Content of a ‘Bioethics for the Biosciences’ Module: An Empirical Study. Journal of Academic Ethics 14 (2):103-114.
    With rapid advances in the biosciences, bioethics has become an important, if not vital part of a comprehensive bioscience education. Students who successfully complete a course in bioethics will be better equipped for writing manuscripts for publication, preparing research proposals for funding bodies and completing applications for research ethics committees. Given the importance of both grant writing and successful publication in a bioscience career, bioscience students who do not receive training in bioethics will be disadvantaged. Graduates who move into careers (...)
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  15.  20
    David Leiser & Udi Bonshtein (2003). Theory of Mind in Schizophrenia: Damaged Module or Deficit in Cognitive Coordination? Behavioral and Brain Sciences 26 (1):95-96.
    Schizophrenics exhibit a deficit in theory of mind (ToM), but an intact theory of biology (ToB). One explanation is that ToM relies on an independent module that is selectively damaged. Phillips & Silverstein's analyses suggest an alternative: ToM requires the type of coordination that is impaired in schizophrenia, whereas ToB is spared because this type of coordination is not involved.
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  16.  1
    Peter M. Todd & Alejandro López (1998). Pulling the Trigger on the Living Kind Module. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 21 (4):592-592.
    Atran conjectures that a triggering algorithm for a living- kind module could involve inputs from other modules that detect animacy and intentionality. Here we further speculate about how algorithms for detecting specific intentions could be used to trigger between- or within-species categorization. Such categorization may be adaptively important in Eldredge's energy and information realms.
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  17.  22
    Ames Dhai (2005). Module Five: Implementation of Ethics Review. Developing World Bioethics 5 (1):73–91.
    ABSTRACTThe objective of this module is to inform you on issues of concern for Research Ethics Committee members and investigators during the review process. The many guidelines on research ethics, including those from the South African Department of Health and the World Health Organisation, will be referred to extensively to educate you on the requirements of Research Ethics Committees. The evolution of the review process in South Africa will be detailed.
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  18.  23
    Cheryl Cates & Bryan Dansberry (2004). A Professional Ethics Learning Module for Use in Co-Operative Education. Science and Engineering Ethics 10 (2):401-407.
    The Professional Practice Program, also known as the co-operative education (co-op) program, at the University of Cincinnati (UC) is designed to provide eligible students with the most comprehensive and professional preparation available. Beginning with the Class of 2006, students in UC’s Centennial Co-op Class will be following a new co-op curriculum centered around a set of learning outcomes Regardless of their particular discipline, students will pursue common learning outcomes by participating in the Professional Practice Program, which will cover issues of (...)
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  19.  11
    E. J. Jeffrey, J. Goddard & D. Jeffrey (2012). Performance and Palliative Care: A Drama Module for Medical Students. Medical Humanities 38 (2):110-114.
    This paper describes an innovative 2 weeks module for medical students facilitated by drama educators and a palliative medicine doctor. The module incorporates drama, end-of-life care, teamwork and reflective practice. The module contents, practical aspects of drama teaching and learning outcomes are discussed. Various themes emerged from a study of Harold Pinter's play, The Caretaker, which were relevant to clinical practice: silence, power, communication, uncertainty and unanswered questions. Drama teaching may be one way of enhancing students’ confidence, (...)
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  20.  3
    Jane Coughlan & Stephen Swift (2011). Student and Tutor Perceptions of Learning and Teaching on a First‐Year Study Skills Module in a University Computing Department. Educational Studies 37 (5):529-539.
    The level of student preparedness for university?level study has been widely debated. Effective study skills modules have been linked to supporting students? academic development during the transition phase. However, few studies have evaluated the learning experience on study skills modules from both a student and staff perspective. We surveyed 121 first?year students and seven tutors on a study skills module on an undergraduate computing programme. The aspects in which the students? and tutors? views diverge provide insights into the perceptions (...)
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  21.  2
    B. Glasser (2001). From Kafka to Casualty: Doctors and Medicine in Popular Culture and the Arts-- A Special Studies Module. Medical Humanities 27 (2):99-101.
    This paper describes and reflects on the content and teaching methods of a two-week medical humanities special studies module taken by third-year students at the Royal Free & University College Medical School. It aims to add to the common pool of knowledge, and will be of use to people who are considering setting up something similar.
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  22. Isabella Seeger (forthcoming). MA TEFL/TESL Module 6. Corpus.
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  23.  14
    Robert Vermeulen, What If Every Subconscious Brain Module is Really an Independent Consciousness?
    What if subconscious brain processes are actually independent consciousnesses, each resembling an independent advisor whispering advice to the main consciousness, or “I”? This multi-consciousness model would support free will, as our choices are informed by other consciousnesses, not the subconscious. Each independent consciousness allows a movable perspective through its rich representation of the world and constantly seeks harmony and resonance between its internal concepts, other consciousnesses, external reality, and the genetic worm hole to the evolutionary past.
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  24.  4
    Ken Cheng (1986). A Purely Geometric Module in the Rat's Spatial Representation. Cognition 23 (2):149-178.
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  25.  14
    Ken Cheng (2008). Whither Geometry? Troubles of the Geometric Module. Trends in Cognitive Sciences 12 (9):355-361.
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  26.  3
    Andrew A. Fingelkurts, Alexander A. Fingelkurts, Sergio Bagnato, Cristina Boccagni & Giuseppe Galardi (2016). The Chief Role of Frontal Operational Module of the Brain Default Mode Network in the Potential Recovery of Consciousness From the Vegetative State: A Preliminary Comparison of Three Case Reports. The Open Neuroimaging Journal 10:41-51.
    It has been argued that complex subjective sense of self is linked to the brain default-mode network (DMN). Recent discovery of heterogeneity between distinct subnets (or operational modules - OMs) of the DMN leads to a reconceptualization of its role for the experiential sense of self. Considering the recent proposition that the frontal DMN OM is responsible for the first-person perspective and the sense of agency, while the posterior DMN OMs are linked to the continuity of ‘I’ experience (including autobiographical (...)
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  27.  3
    Jerry A. Fodor (1985). Reply Module. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 8 (1):33-42.
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  28.  15
    Simona Giordano (2010). Medical Humanities: An E-Module at the University of Manchester. Cambridge Quarterly of Healthcare Ethics 19 (4):446-457.
    The importance of humanities in the medical curriculum is increasingly recognized. For example, in the United Kingdom, The General Medical Council, which is an independent body established under the Medical Act 1858 and responsible, among other things, for fostering good medical practice and promoting high standards of medical education, in its publication Tomorrow’s Doctors, encouraged inclusion of humanities in the medical curriculum. Literature, arts, poetry, and philosophy are thought to foster the doctors’ ability to “communicate with patients, to penetrate more (...)
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  29.  27
    Evgeniya Georgieva & Tsvetan Hristov (2007). Design of an E-Learning Content Visualization Module. Communication and Cognition: An Interdisciplinary Quarterly Journal 40 (3):245.
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  30.  15
    Udo Schuklenk (2005). Module One: Introduction to Research Ethics. Developing World Bioethics 5 (1):1-13.
    We will also learn what the issues are that people involved in research on research ethics are concerned with. Ethics without an unde.
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  31.  18
    Natsuki Oka (2002). Apparent “Free Will” Caused by Representation of Module Control”. In Kunio Yasue, Marj Jibu & Tarcisio Della Senta (eds.), No Matter, Never Mind. John Benjamins 243--249.
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  32.  1
    Stephen E. Loeb & Daniel T. Ostas (1997). A Business Ethics Experiential Learning Module: The Maryland Business School Experience. Teaching Business Ethics 1 (1):21-32.
  33.  8
    Udo Schüklenk (2005). Module One: Introduction to Research Ethics. Developing World Bioethics 5 (1):1–13.
    We will also learn what the issues are that people involved in research on research ethics are concerned with. Ethics without an unde.
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  34.  12
    Emmanuel Bigand, Barbara Tillmann & Bénédicte Poulin-Charronnat (2006). A Module for Syntactic Processing in Music? Trends in Cognitive Sciences 10 (5):195-196.
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  35. Gerry Shaw (1996). The Pleckstrin Homology Domain: An Intriguing Multifunctional Protein Module. Bioessays 18 (1):35-46.
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  36.  2
    Seokyung Hahn, Paul Garner & Paula Williamson (2000). Are Systematic Reviews Taking Heterogeneity Into Account? An Analysis From the Infectious Diseases Module of the Cochrane Library. Journal of Evaluation in Clinical Practice 6 (2):231-233.
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  37.  3
    Mark S. Seidenberg (1985). Lexicon as Module. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 8 (1):31-32.
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  38.  3
    Roberta Michnick Golinkoff, Kathryn Hirsh-Pasek & Lauretta Reeves (1991). Have Four Module and Eat It Too! Behavioral and Brain Sciences 14 (4):561.
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  39.  9
    Olav Wicken (2006). Module 1: The Emergence of Science. Emergence: Complexity and Organization 10:12.
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  40.  6
    Fabrice Confalonieri & Michel Duguet (1995). A 200-Amino Acid ATPase Module in Search of a Basic Function. Bioessays 17 (7):639-650.
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  41.  5
    Joaquin M. Fuster (1995). Not the Module Does Memory Make – but the Network. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 18 (4):631.
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  42.  5
    Kurihara Akira (1990). The Emperor System as Japanese National Religion: The Emperor System Module in Everyday Consciousness. Japanese Journal of Religious Studies 17 (2/3):315-340.
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  43.  3
    Benjamin Kuipers (1982). The Cognitive Map Must Be a Separate Module. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 5 (4):645.
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  44.  15
    Fred H. Previc (2000). From Broca's Aphasia to the Language Module: A Transformation Too Large? Behavioral and Brain Sciences 23 (1):49-50.
    This commentary focuses on the larger implications of Grodzinsky's hypothesis. Although Grodzinsky argues persuasively that the syntactic comprehension deficits in Broca's aphasia involve mainly an inability to comprehend sentences requiring a transformational movement of phrasal constituents, his larger claim for a distinct and dedicated “language organ” in the left hemisphere is much less tenable.
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  45.  2
    Zhang Zentigan (2008). Methodology and Teaching Module Design in Business Ethics. Journal of Business Ethics Education 5:285-288.
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  46.  10
    Rick Dale & Michael Spivey (2002). A Linguistic Module for Integrating the Senses, or a House of Cards? Behavioral and Brain Sciences 25 (6):681-682.
    Carruthers invokes a number of controversial assumptions to support his thesis. Most are questionable and unnecessary to investigate the wider relevance of language in cognition. A number of research programs (e.g., interactionist psycholinguistics and cognitive linguistics) have for years pursued a similar thesis and provide a more empirically grounded framework for investigating language’ cognitive functions.
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  47.  6
    Myles Brand (1982). A Course Module on the Nature of Events. Teaching Philosophy 5 (3):221-225.
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  48.  6
    Gerard Kempen (2000). Could Grammatical Encoding and Grammatical Decoding Be Subserved by the Same Processing Module? Behavioral and Brain Sciences 23 (1):38-39.
    Grodzinsky interprets linguistic differences between agrammatic comprehension and production symptoms as supporting the hypothesis that the mechanisms underlying grammatical encoding (sentence formulation) and grammatical decoding (syntactic parsing) are at least partially distinct. This inference is shown to be premature. A range of experimentally established similarities between the encoding and decoding processes is highlighted, testifying to the viability of the hypothesis that receptive and productive syntactic tasks are performed by the same syntactic processor.
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  49.  1
    Manuela Friedrich (1997). " Reaction Time" in the Neural Network Module ART 1. Poznan Studies in the Philosophy of the Sciences and the Humanities 56:215-238.
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  50.  2
    Peter W. Jusczyk & Asher Cohen (1985). What Constitutes a Module? Behavioral and Brain Sciences 8 (1):20-21.
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