Search results for 'Module' (try it on Scholar)

1000+ found
Sort by:
  1. Olubunmi A. Ogunrin, Temidayo O. Ogundiran & Clement Adebamowo (2013). Development and Pilot Testing of an Online Module for Ethics Education Based on the Nigerian National Code for Health Research Ethics. BMC Medical Ethics 14 (1):1-.score: 18.0
    Background: The formulation and implementation of national ethical regulations to protect research participants is fundamental to ethical conduct of research. Ethics education and capacity are inadequate in developing African countries. This study was designed to develop a module for online training in research ethics based on the Nigerian National Code of Health Research Ethics and assess its ease of use and reliability among biomedical researchers in Nigeria.MethodologyThis was a three-phased evaluation study. Phase one involved development of an online training (...)
    Direct download (11 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  2. Alexandra D. Twyman & Nora S. Newcombe (2010). Five Reasons to Doubt the Existence of a Geometric Module. Cognitive Science 34 (7):1315-1356.score: 18.0
    It is frequently claimed that the human mind is organized in a modular fashion, a hypothesis linked historically, though not inevitably, to the claim that many aspects of the human mind are innately specified. A specific instance of this line of thought is the proposal of an innately specified geometric module for human reorientation. From a massive modularity position, the reorientation module would be one of a large number that organized the mind. From the core knowledge position, the (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  3. Richard Gray (2001). Cognitive Modules, Synaesthesia and the Constitution of Psychological Natural Kinds. Philosophical Psychology 14 (1):65-82.score: 12.0
    Fodor claims that cognitive modules can be thought of as constituting a psychological natural kind in virtue of their possession of most or all of nine specified properties. The challenge to this considered here comes from synaesthesia. Synaesthesia is a type of cross-modal association: input to one sensory modality reliably generates an additional sensory output that is usually generated by the input to a distinct sensory modality. The most common form of synaesthesia manifests Fodor's nine specified properties of modularity, and (...)
    Direct download (11 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  4. Philip Gerrans (2002). The Theory of Mind Module in Evolutionary Psychology. Biology and Philosophy 17 (3):305-21.score: 12.0
    Evolutionary Psychology is based on the idea that the mind is a set of special purpose thinking devices or modules whose domain-specific structure is an adaptation to ancestral environments. The modular view of the mind is an uncontroversial description of the periphery of the mind, the input-output sensorimotor and affective subsystems. The novelty of EP is the claim that higher order cognitive processes also exhibit a modular structure. Autism is a primary case study here, interpreted as a developmental failure of (...)
    Direct download (10 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  5. David Leiser & Udi Bonshtein (2003). Theory of Mind in Schizophrenia: Damaged Module or Deficit in Cognitive Coordination? Behavioral and Brain Sciences 26 (1):95-96.score: 12.0
    Schizophrenics exhibit a deficit in theory of mind (ToM), but an intact theory of biology (ToB). One explanation is that ToM relies on an independent module that is selectively damaged. Phillips & Silverstein's analyses suggest an alternative: ToM requires the type of coordination that is impaired in schizophrenia, whereas ToB is spared because this type of coordination is not involved.
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  6. Cheryl Cates & Bryan Dansberry (2004). A Professional Ethics Learning Module for Use in Co-Operative Education. Science and Engineering Ethics 10 (2):401-407.score: 12.0
    The Professional Practice Program, also known as the co-operative education (co-op) program, at the University of Cincinnati (UC) is designed to provide eligible students with the most comprehensive and professional preparation available. Beginning with the Class of 2006, students in UC’s Centennial Co-op Class will be following a new co-op curriculum centered around a set of learning outcomes Regardless of their particular discipline, students will pursue common learning outcomes by participating in the Professional Practice Program, which will cover issues of (...)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  7. Jason P. Lott (2005). Module Three: Vulnerable/Special Participant Populations. Developing World Bioethics 5 (1):30–54.score: 12.0
    ABSTRACT This module is designed to sensitise you to the special needs of participants who belong to populations that are more vulner.
    Direct download (12 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  8. Benjamin Schneider & Udo Schüklenk (2005). Module Six: Special Issues. Developing World Bioethics 5 (1):92–108.score: 12.0
    The objective of this module is to cover ground that was not covered in-depth in any of the other modules, including: scientific misc.
    Direct download (13 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  9. E. J. Jeffrey, J. Goddard & D. Jeffrey (2012). Performance and Palliative Care: A Drama Module for Medical Students. Medical Humanities 38 (2):110-114.score: 12.0
    This paper describes an innovative 2 weeks module for medical students facilitated by drama educators and a palliative medicine doctor. The module incorporates drama, end-of-life care, teamwork and reflective practice. The module contents, practical aspects of drama teaching and learning outcomes are discussed. Various themes emerged from a study of Harold Pinter's play, The Caretaker, which were relevant to clinical practice: silence, power, communication, uncertainty and unanswered questions. Drama teaching may be one way of enhancing students’ confidence, (...)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  10. Positionnement du Module Dans le Cursus (forthcoming). Description du Module. Comprendre.score: 12.0
    No categories
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  11. Gerd Michelsen (2013). Sustainable Development as a Challenge for Undergraduate Students: The Module “Science Bears Responsibility” in the Leuphana Bachelor's Programme. Science and Engineering Ethics 19 (4):1505-1511.score: 12.0
    The Leuphana Semester at Leuphana University Lüneburg, together with the module “Science bears responsibility” demonstrate how innovative methods of teaching and learning can be combined with the topic of sustainable development and how new forms of university teaching can be introduced. With regard to module content, it has become apparent that, due to the complexity of the field of sustainability, a single discipline alone is unable to provide analyses and solutions. If teaching in higher education is to adequately (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  12. Lee Anne Peck & Nancy J. Matchett (2010). An Online Ethics Training Module for Public Relations Professionals. Public Relations Journal 4 (4).score: 12.0
    Researchers developed and tested an online training module with both experienced public relations professionals and newcomers to the field with the hopes of helping them sharpen and refine their ethical decision-making skills. The study found that although most testers reported the Web site was difficult to navigate and/or found the ethical content to be complex, the majority believed their ethical decision-making abilities were improved.
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  13. Peter M. Todd & Alejandro López (1998). Pulling the Trigger on the Living Kind Module. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 21 (4):592-592.score: 12.0
    Atran conjectures that a triggering algorithm for a living- kind module could involve inputs from other modules that detect animacy and intentionality. Here we further speculate about how algorithms for detecting specific intentions could be used to trigger between- or within-species categorization. Such categorization may be adaptively important in Eldredge's energy and information realms.
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  14. Jane Coughlan & Stephen Swift (2011). Student and Tutor Perceptions of Learning and Teaching on a First‐Year Study Skills Module in a University Computing Department. Educational Studies 37 (5):529-539.score: 12.0
    The level of student preparedness for university?level study has been widely debated. Effective study skills modules have been linked to supporting students? academic development during the transition phase. However, few studies have evaluated the learning experience on study skills modules from both a student and staff perspective. We surveyed 121 first?year students and seven tutors on a study skills module on an undergraduate computing programme. The aspects in which the students? and tutors? views diverge provide insights into the perceptions (...)
    No categories
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  15. John Bolender (2003). The Genealogy of the Moral Modules. Minds and Machines 13 (2):233-255.score: 10.0
    This paper defends a cognitive theory of those emotional reactions which motivate and constrain moral judgment. On this theory, moral emotions result from mental faculties specialized for automatically producing feelings of approval or disapproval in response to mental representations of various social situations and actions. These faculties are modules in Fodor's sense, since they are informationally encapsulated, specialized, and contain innate information about social situations. The paper also tries to shed light on which moral modules there are, which of these (...)
    Direct download (12 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  16. James F. Woodward & Fiona Cowie (2004). The Mind is Not (Just) a System of Modules Shaped (Just) by Natural Selection. In Christopher Hitchcock (ed.), Contemporary Debates in Philosophy of Science. Malden MA: Blackwell Publishing. 312-34.score: 9.0
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  17. Peter Carruthers (2003). Is the Mind a System of Modules Shaped by Natural Selection? In Christopher R. Hitchcock (ed.), Contemporary Debates in the Philosophy of Science. Blackwell.score: 9.0
    This chapter defends the positive thesis which constitutes its title. It argues first, that the mind has been shaped by natural selection; and second, that the result of that shaping process is a modular mental architecture. The arguments presented are all broadly empirical in character, drawing on evidence provided by biologists, neuroscientists and psychologists (evolutionary, cognitive, and developmental), as well as by researchers in artificial intelligence. Yet the conclusion is at odds with the manifest image of ourselves provided both by (...)
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  18. John M. Collins (2005). Faculty Disputes. Mind and Language 19 (5):503-33.score: 9.0
    Jerry Fodor, among others, has maintained that Chomsky's language faculty hypothesis is an epistemological proposal, i.e. the faculty comprises propositional structures known (cognized) by the speaker/hearer. Fodor contrasts this notion of a faculty with an architectural (directly causally efficacious) notion of a module. The paper offers an independent characterisation of the language faculty as an abstractly specified nonpropositional structure of the mind/brain that mediates between sound and meaning—a function in intension that maps to a pair of structures that determine (...)
    Direct download (10 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  19. John M. Collins (2000). Theory of Mind, Logical Form and Eliminativism. Philosophical Psychology 13 (4):465-490.score: 9.0
    I argue for a cognitive architecture in which folk psychology is supported by an interface of a ToM module and the language faculty, the latter providing the former with interpreted LF structures which form the content representations of ToM states. I show that LF structures satisfy a range of key features asked of contents. I confront this account of ToM with eliminativism and diagnose and combat the thought that "success" and innateness are inconsistent with the falsity of folk psychology. (...)
    Direct download (8 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  20. Alison Gopnik & Andrew N. Meltzoff (1998). Theories Vs. Modules: To the Max and Beyond: A Reply to Poulin-Dubois and to Stich and Nichols. Mind and Language 13 (3):450-456.score: 9.0
    Direct download (8 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  21. Fred H. Previc (2000). From Broca's Aphasia to the Language Module: A Transformation Too Large? Behavioral and Brain Sciences 23 (1):49-50.score: 9.0
    This commentary focuses on the larger implications of Grodzinsky's hypothesis. Although Grodzinsky argues persuasively that the syntactic comprehension deficits in Broca's aphasia involve mainly an inability to comprehend sentences requiring a transformational movement of phrasal constituents, his larger claim for a distinct and dedicated “language organ” in the left hemisphere is much less tenable.
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  22. Rick Dale & Michael Spivey (2002). A Linguistic Module for Integrating the Senses, or a House of Cards? Behavioral and Brain Sciences 25 (6):681-682.score: 9.0
    Carruthers invokes a number of controversial assumptions to support his thesis. Most are questionable and unnecessary to investigate the wider relevance of language in cognition. A number of research programs (e.g., interactionist psycholinguistics and cognitive linguistics) have for years pursued a similar thesis and provide a more empirically grounded framework for investigating language’ cognitive functions.
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  23. Pamela Andanda (2005). Module Two: Informed Consent. Developing World Bioethics 5 (1):14–29.score: 9.0
    Direct download (11 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  24. Simona Giordano (2010). Medical Humanities: An E-Module at the University of Manchester. Cambridge Quarterly of Healthcare Ethics 19 (04):446-457.score: 9.0
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  25. Gerard Kempen (2000). Could Grammatical Encoding and Grammatical Decoding Be Subserved by the Same Processing Module? Behavioral and Brain Sciences 23 (1):38-39.score: 9.0
    Grodzinsky interprets linguistic differences between agrammatic comprehension and production symptoms as supporting the hypothesis that the mechanisms underlying grammatical encoding (sentence formulation) and grammatical decoding (syntactic parsing) are at least partially distinct. This inference is shown to be premature. A range of experimentally established similarities between the encoding and decoding processes is highlighted, testifying to the viability of the hypothesis that receptive and productive syntactic tasks are performed by the same syntactic processor.
    Direct download (7 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  26. Carol Rausch Albright (2000). The "God Module" and the Complexifying Brain. Zygon 35 (4):735-744.score: 9.0
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  27. Gerard R. Renardel de Lavalette (2008). Interpolation in Computing Science: The Semantics of Modularization. Synthese 164 (3):437-450.score: 9.0
    The Interpolation Theorem, first formulated and proved by W. Craig fifty years ago for predicate logic, has been extended to many other logical frameworks and is being applied in several areas of computer science. We give a short overview, and focus on the theory of software systems and modules. An algebra of theories TA is presented, with a nonstandard interpretation of the existential quantifier . In TA, the interpolation property of the underlying logic corresponds with the quantifier combination property . (...)
    No categories
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  28. Udo Schuklenk (2005). Module One: Introduction to Research Ethics. Developing World Bioethics 5 (1):1-13.score: 9.0
    We will also learn what the issues are that people involved in research on research ethics are concerned with. Ethics without an unde.
    Direct download (10 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  29. B. Glasser (2001). From Kafka to Casualty: Doctors and Medicine in Popular Culture and the Arts-- A Special Studies Module. Medical Humanities 27 (2):99-101.score: 9.0
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  30. Myles Brand (1982). A Course Module on the Nature of Events. Teaching Philosophy 5 (3):221-225.score: 9.0
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  31. Guangyu Chen, Hong-Ying Zhang, Chunming Xie, Gang Chen, Zhi-Jun Zhang, Gao-Jun Teng & Shi-Jiang Li (2013). Modular Reorganization of Brain Resting State Networks and its Independent Validation in Alzheimer's Disease Patients. Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 7.score: 9.0
    Previous studies have demonstrated disruption in structural and functional connectivity occurring in the Alzheimer’s Disease (AD). However, it is not known how these disruptions alter brain network reorganization. With the modular analysis method of graph theory, and datasets acquired by the resting-state functional connectivity MRI (R-fMRI) method, we investigated and compared the brain organization patterns between the AD group and the cognitively normal control (CN) group. Our main finding is that the largest homotopic module (defined as the insula (...)) in the CN group was broken down to the pieces in the AD group. Specifically, it was discovered that the eight pairs of the bilateral regions (the opercular part of inferior frontal gyrus, area triangularis, insula, putamen, globus pallidus, transverse temporal gyri, superior temporal gyrus, and superior temporal pole) of the insula module had lost symmetric functional connection properties, and the corresponding gray matter concentration (GMC) was significant lower in AD group. We further quantified the functional connectivity changes with an index (index A) and structural changes with the GMC index in the insula module to demonstrate their great potential as AD biomarkers. We further validated these results with six additional independent datasets (271 subjects in six groups). Our results demonstrated specific underlying structural and functional reorganization from young to old, and for diseased subjects. Further, it is suggested that by combining the structural GMC analysis and functional modular analysis in the insula module, a new biomarker can be developed at the single-subject level. (shrink)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  32. Ames Dhai (2005). Module Five: Implementation of Ethics Review. Developing World Bioethics 5 (1):73–91.score: 9.0
    Direct download (12 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  33. D. Kirklin (2000). Living with and Dying From Cancer: A Humanities Special Study Module. Medical Humanities 26 (1):51-54.score: 9.0
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  34. Udo Schüklenk (2005). Module One: Introduction to Research Ethics. Developing World Bioethics 5 (1):1–13.score: 9.0
    We will also learn what the issues are that people involved in research on research ethics are concerned with. Ethics without an unde.
    Direct download (9 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  35. Michael J. Selgelid (2005). Module Four: Standards of Care and Clinical Trials. Developing World Bioethics 5 (1):55–72.score: 9.0
    Direct download (12 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  36. Kurihara Akira (1990). The Emperor System as Japanese National Religion: The Emperor System Module in Everyday Consciousness. Japanese Journal of Religious Studies 17 (2/3):315-340.score: 9.0
    No categories
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  37. Saverio Cittadini & Carlo Toffalori (2002). Comparing First Order Theories of Modules Over Group Rings. Mathematical Logic Quarterly 48 (1):147-156.score: 9.0
    No categories
    Direct download (7 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  38. Joaquin M. Fuster (1995). Not the Module Does Memory Make – but the Network. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 18 (4):631.score: 9.0
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  39. Peter W. Jusczyk & Asher Cohen (1985). What Constitutes a Module? Behavioral and Brain Sciences 8 (1):20-21.score: 9.0
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  40. Joohyung Lee & Vladimir Lifschitz, A Knowledge Module: Buying and Selling.score: 9.0
    This note shows how to formalize a small set of general facts about buying and selling. We begin with summarizing properties of buying/selling informally in English, and give examples of consequences of these assumptions. Then we formalize our assumptions in action language C+ with additive fluents and actions and test the adequacy of the proposed formalization using the Causal Calculator.
    No categories
    Translate to English
    | Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  41. Stefano Leonesi, Sonia L'Innocente & Carlo Toffalori (2005). Weakly Minimal Modules Over Integral Group Rings and Over Related Classes of Rings. Mathematical Logic Quarterly 51 (6):613-625.score: 9.0
    No categories
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  42. Stephen E. Loeb & Daniel T. Ostas (1997). A Business Ethics Experiential Learning Module: The Maryland Business School Experience. Teaching Business Ethics 1 (1):21-32.score: 9.0
    No categories
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  43. M. Phillips, M. Hennessy & A. Patterson (forthcoming). Power and its Applications: A New Module in the Medical Curriculum at Trinity College Dublin. Medical Humanities.score: 9.0
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  44. Olav Wicken (2006). Module 1: The Emergence of Science. Emergence 10:12.score: 9.0
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  45. Emmanuel Bigand, Barbara Tillmann & Bénédicte Poulin-Charronnat (2006). A Module for Syntactic Processing in Music? Trends in Cognitive Sciences 10 (5):195-196.score: 9.0
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  46. Ken Cheng (1986). A Purely Geometric Module in the Rat's Spatial Representation. Cognition 23 (2):149-178.score: 9.0
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  47. Ken Cheng (2008). Whither Geometry? Troubles of the Geometric Module. Trends in Cognitive Sciences 12 (9):355-361.score: 9.0
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  48. Fabrice Confalonieri & Michel Duguet (1995). A 200-Amino Acid ATPase Module in Search of a Basic Function. Bioessays 17 (7):639-650.score: 9.0
    No categories
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  49. Janet Dean Fodor (1985). Module or Muddle? Behavioral and Brain Sciences 8 (1):7-9.score: 9.0
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  50. Jerry A. Fodor (1985). Reply Module. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 8 (1):33-42.score: 9.0
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
1 — 50 / 1000