Search results for 'Mohamed L. Seghier' (try it on Scholar)

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  1. Nathalie Valenza, Mohamed L. Seghier, Sophie Schwartz, François Lazeyras & Patrik Vuilleumier (2004). Tactile Awareness and Limb Position in Neglect: Functional Magnetic Resonance Imaging. Annals of Neurology 55 (1):139-143.score: 870.0
  2. Sophie Schwartz, Frédéric Assal, Nathalie Valenza, Mohamed L. Seghier & Patrik Vuilleumier (2005). Illusory Persistence of Touch After Right Parietal Damage: Neural Correlates of Tactile Awareness. Brain 128 (2):277-290.score: 870.0
  3. [deleted]Marion Oberhuber, ‘Ōiwi Parker Jones, Thomas M. H. Hope, Susan Prejawa, Mohamed L. Seghier, David W. Green & Cathy J. Price (2013). Functionally Distinct Contributions of the Anterior and Posterior Putamen During Sublexical and Lexical Reading. Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 7.score: 870.0
    Previous studies have investigated orthographic-to-phonological mapping during reading by comparing brain activation for (1) reading words to object naming, or (2) reading pseudowords (e.g. “phume”) to words (e.g. “plume”). Here we combined both approaches to provide new insights into the underlying neural mechanisms. In fMRI data from 25 healthy adult readers, we first identified activation that was greater for reading words and pseudowords relative to picture and color naming. The most significant effect was observed in the left putamen, extending to (...)
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  4. [deleted]’Ōiwi Parker Jones, Susan Prejawa, Thomas M. H. Hope, Marion Oberhuber, Mohamed L. Seghier, Alex P. Leff, David W. Green & Cathy J. Price (2014). Sensory-to-Motor Integration During Auditory Repetition: A Combined fMRI and Lesion Study. Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 8.score: 870.0
  5. [deleted]Karine Lebreton, Nicolas Villain, Gaël Chételat, Brigitte Landeau, Mohamed L. Seghier, François Lazeyras, Francis Eustache & Vicente Ibanez (2012). Repetition Enhancement and Perceptual Processing of Visual Word Form. Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 6.score: 870.0
    The current study investigated the cerebral basis of word perceptual repetition priming with fMRI during a letter detection task that manipulated the familiarity of perceptual word form and the number of repetitions. Some neuroimaging studies have reported increases, instead of decreases, in brain activations (called “repetition enhancement”) associated with repetition priming of unfamiliar stimuli which have been interpreted as the creation of new perceptual representations for unfamiliar items. According to this interpretation, several repetitions of unfamiliar items would then be necessary (...)
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  6. Cathy J. Price Mohamed L. Seghier (2012). Functional Heterogeneity Within the Default Network During Semantic Processing and Speech Production. Frontiers in Psychology 3.score: 90.0
    This fMRI study investigated the functional heterogeneity of the core nodes of the default mode network (DMN) during language processing. The core nodes of the DMN were defined as task-induced deactivations over multiple tasks in 94 healthy subjects. We used a factorial design that manipulated different tasks (semantic matching or speech production) and stimuli (familiar words and objects or unfamiliar stimuli), alternating with periods of fixation/rest. Our findings revealed several consistent effects in the DMN, namely less deactivations in the left (...)
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  7. [deleted]Vicente Ibanez Karine Lebreton, Nicolas Villain, Gaël Chételat, Brigitte Landeau, Mohamed L. Seghier, François Lazeyras, Francis Eustache (2012). Repetition Enhancement and Perceptual Processing of Visual Word Form. Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 6.score: 90.0
    The current study investigated the cerebral basis of word perceptual repetition priming with fMRI during a letter detection task that manipulated the familiarity of perceptual word form and the number of repetitions. Some neuroimaging studies have reported increases, instead of decreases, in brain activations (called “repetition enhancement”) associated with repetition priming of unfamiliar stimuli which have been interpreted as the creation of new perceptual representations for unfamiliar items. According to this interpretation, several repetitions of unfamiliar items would then be necessary (...)
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