Search results for 'Mohammad-Saïd Darviche' (try it on Scholar)

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  1.  11
    Mohammad-Saïd Darviche & William Genieys (eds.) (2008). Multinational State Building: Considering and Continuing the Work of Juan Linz. Pôle Sud.
    INTRODUCTION: BUILDING DEMOCRATIC STATES ON NATIONAL DIVERSITY Mohammad-Saïd Darviche & William Genieys Juan J. Linz is one of the most famous scholars in ...
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  2. Hakim Mohammad Said (1991). Essays on Science: Felicitation Volume in Honour of Dr. M.D. Shami. Hamdard Foundation Press.
     
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  3.  1
    Edward W. Said (1989). [Toward a Dialogue with Edward Said]: Response. Critical Inquiry 15 (3):634-646.
    Since neither of these two inordinately long responses deals seriously with what I said in “An Ideology of Difference” , both the Boyarins and Griffin are made even more absurd by actual events occurring as they wrote. The Israeli army has by now been in direct and brutal military occupation of the West Bank and Gaza for twenty-one years; the intifadah, surely the most impressive and disciplined anticolonial insurrection in this century, is now in its eleventh month. The daily killings (...)
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  4. Edward Said (2008). Chapter Twelve Said, Derrida And the Undecidable Human: In the Name Of Inhabitancy Robert P. Marzec. In Mina Karavanta & Nina Morgan (eds.), Edward Said and Jacques Derrida: Reconstellating Humanism and the Global Hybrid. Cambridge Scholars Pub. 304.
     
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  5. Edward W. Said (1989). Representing the Colonized: Anthropology's Interlocutors. Critical Inquiry 15 (2):205-225.
    At this point I should say something about one of the frequent criticisms addressed to me, and to which I have always wanted to respond, that in the process of characterizing the production of Europe’s inferior Others, my work is only negative polemic which does not advance a new epistemological approach or method, and expresses only desperation at the possibility of ever dealing seriously with other cultures. These criticisms are related to the matters I’ve been discussing so far, and while (...)
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  6. Judith Butler, David Campbell, Rey Chow, Fred Dallmayr, Enrique Dussell, Kim Dae Jung, Hwa Yol Jung, Lydia H. Liu, Kishore Mahbubani, Maurice Merleau-Ponty, Chandra Talpade Mohanty, Thich Nhat Hanh, Nishida Kitaro, Bhikhu Parekh, Edward W. Said, Calvin O. Schrag, Watsuji Tetsuro, Tu Weiming & Zhang Longxi (eds.) (2002). Comparative Political Culture in the Age of Globalization: An Introductory Anthology. Lexington Books.
    With its specific focus on Asia, this anthology constitutes an excursion into the realm of transversality, or the state of "postethnicity," which, the book argues, has come to characterize the global culture of our times. Hwa Yol Jung brings together prominent contemporary thinkers—including Thich Nhat Hanh, Edward Said, and Judith Butler—to address this fundamental and important aspect of comparative political theory. The book is divided into three parts. Part One demythologizes Eurocentrism, deconstructing the privilege of modern Europe as the world's (...)
     
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  7.  9
    Edward W. Said (1978). The Problem of Textuality: Two Exemplary Positions. Critical Inquiry 4 (4):673-714.
    Derrida and Foucault are opposed to each other on a number of grounds, and perhaps the one specially singled out in Foucault's attack on Derrida—that Derrida is concerned only with "reading" a text and that a text is nothing more than the "traces" found there by the reader—would be the appropriate one to begin with here.1 According to Foucault, if the text is important for Derrida because its real situation is literally an abysmally textual element, l'écriture en abîme with which (...)
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  8.  15
    Edward W. Said (2001). The Last Taboo in American Discourse. Radical Philosophy Review 3 (2):118-121.
    Media coverage of the recent explosion of violence in the Occupied Palestinian Territories is so thoroughly biased in favor of Israel, argues Edward Said, that Israel itself is made to appear as the victim, despite the fact that it is using missiles, tanks, and helicopter gunships against stone-throwing civilians rebelling, in their own towns, against their continued oppression. American Zionism is so successful, Said adds, that it has rendered impermissible any public discussion of Israeli policy, making this the last taboo (...)
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  9.  14
    Edward W. Said (2001). The Last Taboo in American Discourse. Radical Philosophy Review 3 (2):118-121.
    Media coverage of the recent explosion of violence in the Occupied Palestinian Territories is so thoroughly biased in favor of Israel, argues Edward Said, that Israel itself is made to appear as the victim, despite the fact that it is using missiles, tanks, and helicopter gunships against stone-throwing civilians rebelling, in their own towns, against their continued oppression. American Zionism is so successful, Said adds, that it has rendered impermissible any public discussion of Israeli policy, making this the last taboo (...)
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  10.  3
    Edward W. Said (1985). An Ideology of Difference. Critical Inquiry 12 (1):38-58.
    The Israeli invasion of Lebanon in 1982 seems to have broken, for the first time, the immunity from sustained criticism previously enjoyed by Israel and its American supporters. For a variety of reasons, Israel’s status in European and American public life and discourse has always been special, just as the position of Jews in the West has always been special, sometimes for its tragedy and horrendous suffering, at other times for its uniquely impressive intellectual and aesthetic triumphs. On behalf of (...)
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  11. Yazeed Said (2013). Ghazali's Politics in Context. Routledge.
    Imam Abü Hamid al-Ghazalı is perhaps the most celebrated Muslim theologian of medieval Islam yet little attention has been paid to his personal theology. This book sets out to investigate the relationship between law and politics in the writings of Ghazalı and aims to establish the extent to which this relationship explains Ghazalı’s political theology. Articles concerned with Ghazalı’s political thought have invariably paid little attention to his theology and his thinking about God, neglecting to ask what role these have (...)
     
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  12. Edward W. Said (1983). Response to Stanley Fish. Critical Inquiry 10 (2):371-373.
    At one point Fish says that a profession produces no “real” commodity but offers only a service. But surely the increasing reification of services and even of knowledge has made them a commodity as well. And indeed the logical extension of Fish’s position on professionalism is not that it is something done or lived but something produced and reproduced, albeit with redistributed and redeployed values. What those are, Fish doesn’t say. Then again he makes the rather telling remarks that he (...)
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  13.  3
    Sonia Dayan-Herzbrun (2011). De Frantz Fanon à Edward Said: L'impensé colonial. Journal of French and Francophone Philosophy 19 (1):71-81.
    Un texte n’existe que dans la mesure où il est lu et ses différentes lectures contribuent à en montrer la richesse et l’intérêt. En France on a longtemps lu et on continue encore à lire Fanon, en particulier Les damnés de la terre , à la lumière de la préface que Sartre avait rédigée, à la demande de Fanon lui-même, après une rencontre et d’intenses discussions entre les deux hommes au printemps 1961 à Rome. Le premier chapitre des Damnés de (...)
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  14.  94
    Andrew Peet (2015). Testimonial Knowledge Without Knowledge of What Is Said. Pacific Philosophical Quarterly 96 (3).
    This article discusses the following question: what epistemic relation must audiences bear to the content of assertions in order to gain testimonial knowledge? There is a brief discussion of why this issue is of importance, followed by two counterexamples to the most intuitive answer: that in order for an audience to gain testimonial knowledge that p they must know that the speaker has asserted p. It is then suggested that the argument generalises and can be made to work on different (...)
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  15.  82
    Anders J. Schoubye & Andreas Stokke (2015). What is Said? Noûs 49 (4).
    It is sometimes argued that certain sentences of natural language fail to express truth conditional contents. Standard examples include e.g. Tipper is ready and Steel is strong enough. In this paper, we provide a novel analysis of truth conditional meaning using the notion of a question under discussion. This account explains why these types of sentences are not, in fact, semantically underdetermined, provides a principled analysis of the process by which natural language sentences can come to have enriched meanings in (...)
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  16. P. Williams (2004). Edward Said. Theory, Culture and Society 21 (1):169-171.
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  17. Anne Bezuidenhout (2001). Metaphor and What is Said: A Defense of a Direct Expression View of Metaphor. Midwest Studies in Philosophy 25 (1):156–186.
    According to one widely held view of metaphor, metaphors are cases in which the speaker (literally) says one thing but means something else instead. I wish to challenge this idea. I will argue that when one utters a sentence in some context intending it to be understood metaphorically, one directly expresses a proposition, which can potentially be evaluated as either true or false. This proposition is what is said by the utterance of the sentence in that context. We don’t convey (...)
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  18. Fernando Martinez-Manrique & Agustin Vicente (2013). What is Said by a Metaphor: The Role of Salience and Conventionality. Pragmatics and Cognition 21 (2):304-328.
    Contextualist theorists have recently defended the views (a) that metaphor-processing can be treated on a par with other meaning changes, such as narrowing or transfer, and (b) that metaphorical contents enter into “what is said” by an utterance. We do not dispute claim (a) but consider that claim (b) is problematic. Contextualist theorists seem to leave in the hands of context the explanation about why it is that some meaning changes are directly processed, and thus plausibly form part of “what (...)
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  19.  21
    Jennifer Mather Saul (2012). Lying, Misleading, and What is Said: An Exploration in Philosophy of Language and in Ethics. Oxford University Press.
    1. Lying -- 2. The problem of what is said -- 3. What is said -- 4. Is lying worse than merely misleading? -- 5. Some interesting cases.
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  20. Elisabeth Camp (2006). Contextualism, Metaphor, and What is Said. Mind and Language 21 (3):280–309.
    On a familiar and prima facie plausible view of metaphor, speakers who speak metaphorically say one thing in order to mean another. A variety of theorists have recently challenged this view; they offer criteria for distinguishing what is said from what is merely meant, and argue that these support classifying metaphor within 'what is said'. I consider four such criteria, and argue that when properly understood, they support the traditional classification instead. I conclude by sketching how we might extract a (...)
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  21. Jennifer M. Saul (2002). Speaker Meaning, What is Said, and What is Implicated. Noûs 36 (2):228–248.
    [First Paragraph] Unlike so many other distinctions in philosophy, H P Grice's distinction between what is said and what is implicated has an immediate appeal: undergraduate students readily grasp that one who says 'someone shot my parents' has merely implicated rather than said that he was not the shooter [2]. It seems to capture things that we all really pay attention to in everyday conversation'this is why there are so many people whose entire sense of humour consists of deliberately ignoring (...)
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  22. François Recanati (2001). What is Said. Synthese 128 (1-2):75--91.
    A critique of the purely semantic, minimalist notion of 'what is said'.
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  23. Jason Stanley (2003). Modality and What is Said. In John Hawthorne (ed.), Language and Mind. Blackwell 321--44.
    If, relative to a context, what a sentence says is necessarily true, then what it says must be so. If, relative to a context, what a sentence says is possible, then what it says could be true. Following natural philosophical usage, it would thus seem clear that in assessing an occurrence of a sentence for possibility or necessity, one is assessing what is said by that occurrence. In this paper, I argue that natural philosophical usage misleads here. In assessing an (...)
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  24. Catherine Wearing (2006). Metaphor and What is Said. Mind and Language 21 (3):310–332.
    In this paper, I argue for an account of metaphorical content as what is said when a speaker utters a metaphor. First, I show that two other possibilities—the Gricean account of metaphor as implicature and the strictly semantic account developed by Josef Stern—face several serious problems. In their place, I propose an account that takes metaphorical content to cross-cut the semantic-pragmatic distinction. This requires re-thinking the notion of metaphorical content, as well as the relation between the metaphorical and the literal.
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  25. M. Kissine (2009). Illocutionary Forces and What is Said. Mind and Language 24 (1):122-138.
    A psychologically plausible analysis of the way we assign illocutionary forces to utterances is formulated using a 'contextualist' analysis of what is said. The account offered makes use of J. L. Austin's distinction between phatic acts (sentence meaning), locutionary acts (contextually determined what is said), illocutionary acts, and perolocutionary acts. In order to avoid the conflation between illocutionary and perlocutionary levels, assertive, directive and commissive illocutionary forces are defined in terms of inferential potential with respect to the common ground. Illocutionary (...)
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  26. Richard G. Henson (1979). What Kant Might Have Said: Moral Worth and the Overdetermination of Dutiful Action. Philosophical Review 88 (1):39-54.
    My purpose is to account for some oddities in what Kant did and did not say about "moral worth," and for another in what commentators tell us about his intent. The stone with which I hope to dispatch these several birds is-as one would expect a philosopher's stone to be-a distinction. I distinguish between two things Kant might have had in mind under the heading of moral worth. They come readily to mind when one both takes account of what he (...)
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  27.  69
    Isidora Stojanovic (2006). What is Said, Linguistic Meaning, and Directly Referential Expressions. Philosophy Compass 1 (4):373–397.
    Philosophers of language distinguish among the lexical or linguistic meaning of the sentence uttered, what is said by an utterance of the sentence, and speaker's meaning, or what is conveyed by the speaker to her audience. In most views, what is said is the semantic or truth-conditional content of the utterance, and is irreducible either to the linguistic meaning or to the speaker's meaning. I will show that those views account badly for people's intuitions on what is said. I will (...)
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  28. D. Seedhouse (1995). What I Actually Said About Medical Ethics: A Brief Response to Toon. Journal of Medical Ethics 21 (1):45-48.
    It has been said that I am against medical philosophy. This is a misrepresentation of my position. I am against conventional medical ethics teaching as it has to be done in medical schools, but very much in favour of philosophy in medicine.
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  29.  5
    William D. Hart (2000). Edward Said and the Religious Effects of Culture. Cambridge University Press.
    This book provides a distinctive account of Edward Said's critique of modern culture by highlighting the religion-secularism distinction on which it is predicated. This distinction is both literal and figurative. It refers, on the one hand, to religious traditions and to secular traditions and, on the other hand, to tropes that extend the meaning and reference of religion and secularism in indeterminate ways. The author takes these tropes as the best way of organizing Said's heterogeneous corpus - from Joseph Conrad (...)
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  30.  63
    Patrick Hawley (2002). What is Said. Journal of Pragmatics 34 (8):969-991.
    A common misunderstanding of Grice's distinction between <br>saying and implicating is that the hearer in a conversation <br>needs to use what is said in a calculation to determine what <br>is implicated. This mistake lead some to misconstrue the relation <br>between pragmatics and semantics.
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  31.  47
    Luca Baptista (2014). Say What? On Grice On What Is Said. European Journal of Philosophy 22 (1):1-19.
    : In this paper I argue that there is a very important, though often neglected, dissimilarity between the two Gricean conceptions of ‘what is said’: the one presented in his William James Lectures and the one sketched in the ‘Retrospective Epilogue’ to his book Studies in the Way of Words. The main problem lies with the idea of speakers' commitment to what they say and how this is to be related to the conventional, or standard, meaning of the sentences uttered (...)
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  32.  47
    Johan Siebers (2011). What Cannot Be Said: Speech and Violence. Journal of Global Ethics 6 (2):89-102.
    In this article, I consider the moment where speech becomes violent because it wants to name at any price - something that can be felt as a desire in speech, a tension of creation and destruction. I discuss Habermas' theory of communicative action and the propositional conception of truth that underpins it. That conception of truth can be contrasted to the theory of truth as event, as it has been developed by Alain Badiou. A similarity between Badiou's theory of truth (...)
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  33.  2
    Catherine Wearing (2006). Metaphor and What is Said. Mind Language 21 (3):310-332.
    In this paper, I argue for an account of metaphorical content as what is said when a speaker utters a metaphor. First, I show that two other possibilities—the Gricean account of metaphor as implicature and the strictly semantic account developed by Josef Stern—face several serious problems. In their place, I propose an account that takes metaphorical content to cross-cut the semantic-pragmatic distinction. This requires re-thinking the notion of metaphorical content, as well as the relation between the metaphorical and the literal.
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  34.  37
    Jurgis Brakas (2011). Aristotle's "is Said in Many Ways" and its Relationship to His Homonyms. Journal of the History of Philosophy 49 (2):135-159.
    Being, Aristotle tells us, "is said in many ways ". So are the good and many other fundamental things. Fair enough, but what on earth does this mean? What, to narrow the focus to the basic question, does Aristotle mean by in phrases such as and other constructions where is used in the same sense? While scholars have presented us with an array of different translations for this difficult term, not all of them are compatible and none seem adequate. Yet (...)
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  35. Emma Borg (2002). The Semantic Significance of What is Said. Protosociology 17:7-25.
    It is often held that a correct semantic theory should assign a semantic content, p, to a given sentence, s, just in case a speaker who utters s says that p – thus ‘what is said’ is taken to be a semantically significant notion. This paper explores what exactly such a claim amounts to and offers five versions of the relationship between a semantic theory and judgements of what is said. The first three of these (...)
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  36. Bruce Robbins (2008). Said And Secularism. In Mina Karavanta & Nina Morgan (eds.), Edward Said and Jacques Derrida: Reconstellating Humanism and the Global Hybrid. Cambridge Scholars Pub. 140.
     
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  37.  11
    Roxana Baiasu (2014). Knowing How to Talk About What Cannot Be Said: Objectivity and Epistemic Locatedness. Sophia 53 (2):215-229.
    I take it that A. W. Moore is right when he said that ‘Wittgenstein was right: some things cannot be put into words. Moreover, some things that cannot be put into words are of the utmost philosophical importance’. There is, however, a constant threat of self-stultification whenever an attempt is made to put the ineffable into words. As Pamela Sue Anderson notes in Re-visioning gender in philosophy of religion: reason, love, and epistemic locatedness, certain recent approaches to ineffability—including Moore’s approach—attempt (...)
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  38.  32
    Luisa Valente (2007). Names That Can Be Said of Everything: Porphyrian Tradition and 'Transcendental' Terms in Twelfth-Century Logic. Vivarium 45 (s 2-3):298-310.
    In an article published in 2003, Klaus Jacobi—using texts partially edited in De Rijk's Logica Modernorum —demonstrated that twelfth-century logic contains a tradition of reflecting about some of the transcendental names . In addition to reinforcing Jacobi's thesis with other texts, this contribution aims to demonstrate two points: 1) That twelfth-century logical reflection about transcendental terms has its origin in the logica vetus , and especially in a passage from Porphyry Isagoge and in Boethius's commentary on it. In spite of (...)
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  39.  7
    Barrie Falk (1992). Wittgenstein on What One Meant and What One Would Have Said. Inquiry 35 (1):21 – 36.
    In a well?known passage, Wittgenstein suggests that claims about what I would have said if asked, offered as an elucidation of what I meant, are hypotheses. Some have argued that Wittgenstein commits himself here to the view that claims about what I meant are hypotheses. I argue that this is to misinterpret the relevant passages and is at odds with central themes in Wittgenstein's philosophy, particularly what he has to say about the first?person relation to meaning. This is not of (...)
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  40.  25
    Robert Schwartz (1993). On 'What is Said to Be'. Synthese 94 (1):43 - 54.
    This paper reexamines an early article by Noam Chomsky and Israel Scheffler concerning the proper formulation and status of Quine's criterion for ontological commitment. ( What is Said to Be,' "Proceedings of the Aristotelian Society", 69, 1958-59; reprinted in Scheffler, "Inquiries".) Somewhat different formulations of the criterion are proposed and their implications explored. It is also argued that Chomsky and Scheffler's views may be seen to foreshadow and lead to some of Quine's later more radical doctrines regarding ontological commitment.
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  41. Jose E. Chaves, Explicature, What is Said and Gricean Factorization Criteria.
    Since Grice introduced the distinction between what is said and implicature, the literature shows a widespread interest in the delimitation of these notions. In this paper, I will identify and specify the criteria with which Grice distinctly determines the factors of the speaker’s meaning and I will use these criteria to compare the Gricean minimalist notion of what is said with the Relevance theoretic notion of explicature. In drawing this comparison, I aim to make it clear that the two approaches (...)
     
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  42.  16
    Georg Behrens (1998). Feeling of Absolute Dependence or Absolute Feeling of Dependence? (What Schleiermacher Really Said and Why It Matters). Religious Studies 34 (4):471-481.
    Friedrich Schleiermacher is known as the theologian who said that the essence of Christian faith is a state of mind called 'the feeling of absolute dependence'. In this respect, Schleiermacher's reputation owes much to the influential translation of his dogmatics prepared by Mackintosh, Stewart and others. I argue that the translation is misleading precisely as to the terms which Schleiermacher uses in order to refer to the religious state of mind. I also show that the translation obscures a problem of (...)
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  43.  12
    Ramin Jahanbegloo (2005). Edward Said's Conception of the Public Intellectual as “Outsider”. Radical Philosophy Review 8 (1):29-34.
    Edward Said's mode of intellectual thinking cannot be categorized in terms of concepts such as liberal, socialist or anarchist. In this sense, Said remained all his life, through his work and his action, an "outsider. " This "outsiderhood" created in him an acute awareness of the world and a critical sense of resistance to all forms of political and intellectual domination. In consequence, Said detects a particularly revealing relationship between a deep-seated commitment to the secular principles of humanism andoutsiderhood as (...)
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  44.  14
    H. S. Harris, Not Said But Shown.
    Through the study of selected works of literature the author seeks what they show to be philosophically interesting without it being said to be so in these works.
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  45.  2
    Rod Bertolet (1980). Context and What Is Said. Canadian Journal of Philosophy 6:97.
    A popular answer to the question of what, In addition to what a sentence means, Determines what a speaker who utters that sentence says, Is the context in which it is uttered. While this answer is often not developed in any detail, Paul ziff in "what is said" attempts to specify just what contextual features are relevant and how they operate. This paper argues that the factors ziff offers are in fact irrelevant to the determination of what is said. The (...)
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  46. Jose E. Chaves, Grice's What is Said Revisited. A Plea for a New Variety of Minimalism.
    Grice has been considered a linguistic minimalist. However, as I will show, this interpretation is incompatible with Grice’s proposal of conventional implicatures and with some of his less popular views such as his explanation of loose uses (Grice 1978/1989: 45; X) or his later acknowledgement of cases in which something is said without being conventionally meant (Grice 1987/1989: 359). Bearing in mind these proposals and the distinction between formality and dictiveness, I will present a new approach to the notion of (...)
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  47.  3
    Robert J. Griffin (1989). Ideology and Misrepresentation: A Response to Edward Said. Critical Inquiry 15 (3):611-625.
    The gist of Edward Said’s attack on Israel is that Zionism is racism. The very appearance of his essay in a special issue devoted to racism is an interesting fact in itself. But the fact that the editors up until now received no responses to Said carries special significance. It signals, or can be read as signaling, that the literary-critical establishment has reached a consensus and that liberal supporters of Israel in our discipline have retreated from the field.I may be (...)
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  48.  3
    D. Bryce (2013). The Absence of Ottoman, Islamic Europe in Edward W. Said's Orientalism. Theory, Culture and Society 30 (1):99-121.
    Edward W. Said’s Orientalism has attained canonical status as the key study of the cultural politics of western representation of the East, specifically the imaginative geographies underwriting constructions such as the Middle East and the Islamic world. The Ottoman Empire overlapped both European and exteriorized Oriental space during much of the period that Said dealt with, yet while the existence of the empire is referred to in Said’s study, the theoretical implications of that presence for his critique of Orientalist discourse (...)
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  49. J. Jesús Camargo (2008). Edward W. Said: 60 años después de la Naqbah y la negación de la ciudadanía a los refugiados palestinos. Astrolabio: Revista Internacional de Filosofía 7:13-23.
    El presente artículo, a partir de la obra del intelectual palestino Edward W. Said, pretende rememorar, tras sesenta años de colonización y ocupación israelí, la Naqbah palestina, es decir, indagar las verdaderas y catastróficas consecuencias de la creación de un «hogar nacional judío» en las tierras de la Palestina histórica. A su vez, se realiza un análisis de la situación de los refugiados palestinos como uno de los más esenciales y trágicos efectos de la creación del Estado de Israel. Así, (...)
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  50. Asma Afsaruddin (2005). Quar'anic Ethics and Said Nursi's Risale-I Nur. In Ian S. Markham & İbrahim Özdemir (eds.), Globalization, Ethics, and Islam: The Case of Bediuzzaman Said Nursi. Ashgate Pub.
     
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