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  1. Moira Gatens (forthcoming). Book Note. [REVIEW] Australasian Journal of Philosophy:1-1.
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  2. Moira Gatens (2015). Mark Sacks Lecture 2013: Spinoza on Goodness and Beauty and the Prophet and the Artist. European Journal of Philosophy 23 (1):1-16.
    Some critics have claimed that Spinoza's philosophy has nothing to offer aesthetics. I argue that within his conception of an ars vivendi one can discern a nascent theory of art . I bring the figure of the prophet in relation to that of the artist and, alongside a consideration of Spinoza's views on goodness and beauty, show that the special talent of the artist should be understood in terms of the entirely natural expression of the conatus.
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  3. Moira Gatens (2014). Identities and Freedom: Feminist Theory Between Power and Connection by Weir, Allison. Australasian Journal of Philosophy 92 (2):412-412.
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  4. Moira Gatens (2013). Spinoza on Philosophy, Religion, and Politics: The Theologico-Political Treatise, by Susan James. Mind 122 (488):1112-1116.
  5. Moira Gatens (2012). Compelling Fictions: Spinoza and George Eliot on Imagination and Belief. European Journal of Philosophy 20 (1):74-90.
    Spinoza took it to be an important psychological fact that belief cannot be compelled. At the same time, he was well aware of the compelling power that religious and political fictions can have on the formation of our beliefs. I argue that Spinoza allows that there are ‘good’ and ‘bad’ fictions. His complex account of the imagination and fiction, and their disabling or enabling roles in gaining knowledge of Nature, is a site of disagreement among commentators. The novels of George (...)
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  6. Stacy Douglas & Moira Gatens (2011). Revisiting the Continental Shelf: Moira Gatens on Law, Religion, and Human Rights in Eliot, Feuerbach, and Spinoza. [REVIEW] Feminist Legal Studies 19 (1):75-82.
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  7. Moira Gatens (2010). The Politics of Our Selves: Power, Autonomy, and Gender in Contemporary Political Theory, by Amy Allen. European Journal of Philosophy 18 (4):615-619.
  8. Moira Gatens (ed.) (2009). Feminist Interpretations of Benedict Spinoza. Pennsylvania State University Press.
    "A collection of essays on the metaphysical, political, theological, ethical and psychological writings of Spinoza.
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  9. Moira Gatens (2009). Introduction: Through Spinoza's "Looking Glass". In , Feminist Interpretations of Benedict Spinoza. Pennsylvania State University Press.
     
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  10. Moira Gatens (2009). Spinoza's Disturbing Thesis: Power, Norms and Fiction in the Tractatus Theologico-Politicus. History of Political Thought 30 (3):455-468.
    This paper treats a recalcitrant problem in Spinoza scholarship, namely, how to reconcile the conception of 'power' in his political writings with that found in his Ethics. Some have doubted the capacity of Spinoza's political philosophy to yield an adequate normative theory. If he is unable to provide a normative ground for political philosophy then perhaps this exposes a problem in Spinoza's philosophy taken as a whole. I argue that the considerable normative resources of his ethical and political philosophy, as (...)
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  11. Moira Gatens (2009). The Art and Philosophy of George Eliot. Philosophy and Literature 33 (1):pp. 73-90.
    This volume of specially-commissioned essays provides accessible introductions to all aspects of George Eliot's writing by some of the most distinguished new and established scholars and critics of Victorian literature. The essays are comprehensive, scholarly and lucidly written, and at the same time offer original insights into the work of one of the most important Victorian novelists, and into her complex and often scandalous career. Discussions of her life, the social, political, and intellectual grounding of her work, and her relation (...)
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  12. Moira Gatens (2009). The Curious Empiricism of George Eliot's Literary Experiments. Philosophy Today 53 (Supplement):19-27.
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  13. Moira Gatens (2009). The Politics of the Imagination. In , Feminist Interpretations of Benedict Spinoza. Pennsylvania State University Press.
     
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  14. Moira Gatens (2008). Marian Evans, George Henry Lewes and “George Eliot”. Angelaki 13 (2):33 – 44.
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  15. Moira Gatens (2008). Re-Coupling Gender and Genre. Angelaki 13 (2):1 – 3.
  16. Moira Gatens (2004). Can Human Rights Accommodate Women's Rights? Towards an Embodied Account of Social Norms, Social Meaning, and Cultural Change. Contemporary Political Theory 3 (3):275.
    The paper is in four parts. The first part offers a brief reminder of the historical context for human rights as women's rights. The second part notes the relative lack of attention in human rights theory to the roles of social meaning and what has been called the ‘social imaginary’. The third part suggests that the social imaginary — understood in terms of the always present backdrop to meaningful social action — may be seen as a fruitful ‘middle ground’ upon (...)
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  17. Moira Gatens (2003). 13 Beauvoir and Biology: A Second Look. In Claudia Card (ed.), The Cambridge Companion to Simone de Beauvoir. Cambridge University Press. 266.
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  18. Moira Gatens (2003). Gilles Deleuze and the Ruin of Representation (Review). Hypatia 18 (3):237-239.
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  19. Moira Gatens (2003). Power, Bodies, and Difference. In Ann Cahill & Jennifer Hansen (eds.), The Continental Feminism Reader. Rowman & Littlefield. 258--275.
  20. Moira Gatens (2003). Philosophy of the Body. In Ann Cahill & Jennifer Hansen (eds.), The Continental Feminism Reader. Rowman & Littlefield. 275.
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  21. Moira Gatens (2003). Book Review: Dorothea Olkowski. Gilles Deleuze and the Ruin of Representation. Berkeley: University of California Press, 1999. [REVIEW] Hypatia 18 (3):237-239.
  22. Moira Gatens (2000). Feminism as "Password": Rethinking the "Possible" with Spinoza and Deleuze. Hypatia 15 (2):59-75.
    : This paper reads Deleuze through a Spinozist lens to conceive of the human being as a dynamic and complex whole in constant interchange with its environment. The author thus moves beyond philosophical dualisms, and challenges the assumption that a hierarchical normative organization is the only possible world. Using the example of rape, she argues that micropolitical strategies might disrupt and "pass" the juridical order and open up alternative, more equitable, forms of sociability.
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  23. Moira Gatens & Genevieve Lloyd (2000). Collective Imaginings. Mind 109 (436):904-907.
  24. Susan James Interviews, Genevieve Lloyd & Moira Gatens (2000). The Power of Spinoza: Feminist Conjunctions. Hypatia 15 (2):40 - 58.
    As a constructive alternative to the exclusionary binaries of Cartesian philosophy, Genevieve Lloyd and Moira Gatens turn to Spinoza. Spinoza's understanding of the body as "in relation" takes the focus of philosophical thought from the homogeneous subject to the heterogeneity of the social, and the focus of politics from individual rights to collective responsibility. The implications for feminism are radical; Spinoza enables a reconceptualization of the imaginary and the possibility of a sociability of inclusion.
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  25. Susan James, Genevieve Lloyd & Moira Gatens (2000). The Power of Spinoza: Feminist Conjunctions. Hypatia 15 (2):40-58.
    : As a constructive alternative to the exclusionary binaries of Cartesian philosophy, Genevieve Lloyd and Moira Gatens turn to Spinoza. Spinoza's understanding of the body as "in relation" takes the focus of philosophical thought from the homo-geneous subject to the heterogeneity of the social, and the focus of politics from individual rights to collective responsibility. The implications for feminism are radical; Spinoza enables a reconceptualization of the imaginary and the possibility of a sociability of inclusion.
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  26. Genevieve Lloyd & Moira Gatens (2000). The Power of Spinoza: Feminist Conjunctions. Hypatia 15 (2):40 - 58.
    As a constructive alternative to the exclusionary binaries of Cartesian philosophy, Genevieve Lloyd and Moira Gatens turn to Spinoza. Spinoza's understanding of the body as "in relation" takes the focus of philosophical thought from the homogeneous subject to the heterogeneity of the social, and the focus of politics from individual rights to collective responsibility. The implications for feminism are radical; Spinoza enables a reconceptualization of the imaginary and the possibility of a sociability of inclusion.
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  27. Genevieve Lloyd & Moira Gatens (2000). The Power of Spinoza: Feminist Conjunctions: Susan James Interviews. Hypatia 15 (2):40-58.
  28. Moira Gatens (1999). Collective Imaginings: Spinoza, Past and Present. Routledge.
    In this intriguing book, Moira Gatens and Genevieve Lloyd show us that in spite of-or rather because of-Spinoza's apparent strangeness, his philosophy can be a rich source for cultural self-understanding in the present. Collective Imaginings draws on recent reassessments of the philosophy of Spinoza and develops new ways of conceptualizing issues of freedom and difference. These newly contextualized theories are easily applied to contemporary issues, such as environmental debates, issues of feminism, the conception of democracy, and the idea of the (...)
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  29. Barbara Caine & Moira Gatens (1998). Australian Feminism a Companion. Monograph Collection (Matt - Pseudo).
  30. Moira Gatens (1998). Book Review. [REVIEW] Literature and Aesthetics 8:148-150.
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  31. Moira Gatens (1998). Feminist Ethics. Monograph Collection (Matt - Pseudo).
     
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  32. Moira Gatens (1998). Recognition, Redistribution and the'Postsocialist Condition'. Theory and Event 2 (4).
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  33. Moira Gatens (1997). Sex, Gender, Sexuality: Can Ethologists Practice Genealogy? Southern Journal of Philosophy 34 (Supplement):1-19.
  34. Moira Gatens (1996). Imaginary Bodies: Ethics, Power, and Corporeality. Routledge.
    Imaginary Bodies is a collection of essays that offer a sustained challenge to traditional philosophical notions of the body, sex and gender. Moira Gatens explores alternative positions to dualism by exploring psychoanalytic, Foucaultian and Spinozist notions of embodiment. The book traces a largely neglected geneaology of philosophers from Spinoza, Nietzsche, Freud, Foucault and Deleuze and sets this tradition against that of the Enlightenment. What emerges are new ways of thinking those aspects of life which Gatens calls "imaginary." Confining herself to (...)
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  35. Moira Gatens (1996). Sex, Contract and Genealogy. Journal of Political Philosophy 4 (1):29–44.
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  36. Moira Gatens (1996). Sex, Gender, Sexuality. Southern Journal of Philosophy 35 (Supplement):1-19.
  37. Moira Gatens (1995). Between the Sexes: Care or Justice? In Brenda Almond (ed.), Introducing Applied Ethics. Blackwell. 42--57.
     
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  38. Moira Gatens (1994). Agents and Lives: Moral Thinking in Literature (Review). Philosophy and Literature 18 (1):177-178.
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  39. Moira Gatens, Lorraine Code, Claudia Card & Rosi Braidotti (1993). Feminism and Philosophy. Philosophical Quarterly 43 (173):513-519.
  40. Moira Gatens (1991). Feminism and Philosophy: Perspectives on Difference and Equality. Indiana University Press.
  41. Moira Gatens (1991). 'The Oppressed State of My Sex': Wollstonecraft on Reason, Feeling and Equality. In Carole Pateman & Mary Lyndon Shanley (eds.), Feminist Interpretations and Political Theory. Polity Press in Association with Basil Blackwell, Oxford, Uk. 112--28.
  42. Moira Gatens (1989). Sex/Gender Distinction: A Reply to Plumwood. Radical Philosophy 53:54.
     
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  43. Moira Gatens (1986). Rousseau and Wollstonecraft: Nature Vs. Reason. Australasian Journal of Philosophy 64 (sup1):1-15.
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