Search results for 'Molecule' (try it on Scholar)

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  1.  2
    Sigrid Milles & Edward A. Lemke (2013). What Precision‐Protein‐Tuning and Nano‐Resolved Single Molecule Sciences Can Do for Each Other. Bioessays 35 (1):65-74.
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  2.  2
    Jon Umerez (2009). Where Does Pattee's “How Does a Molecule Become a Message?” Belong in the History of Biosemiotics? Biosemiotics 2 (3):269-290.
    Recalling the title of Yoxen’s classical paper on the influence of Schrödinger’s book, I analyze the role that the work of H. Pattee might have played, if any, in the development of Biosemiotics. I take his 1969 paper “How does a molecule become a message?” (Developmental Biology Supplement) as a first target due to several circumstances that make it especially salient. On the one hand, even if Pattee has obviously developed further his ideas on later papers, the significance of (...)
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  3.  1
    Peter Zwack (1998). The Molecule Maxim: Guidelines for an Evolved Enterprise Culture in Hungary. World Futures 52 (2):155-161.
    Problems arising from the transformation of Hungary from a monolithic society into a market economy are addressed. In the past, under communism, the worker was a faceless digit in a mass proletariat. He had no rights, but also no sense of obligation to society and the community. How can the business community instil in its worker a sense of their own unique individuality and role in their company and in society, a psychological awakening that will benefit not only the works (...)
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  4.  13
    Jerome A. Feldman (2006/2008). From Molecule to Metaphor: A Neural Theory of Language. MIT Press.
    A theory that treats language not as an abstract symbol system but as a function of our brains and experience, integrating recent findings from biology, ...
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  5.  3
    H. H. Pattee (2009). Response by H. H. Pattee to Jon Umerez's Paper: “Where Does Pattee's “How Does a Molecule Become a Message?” Belong in the History of Biosemiotics?”. [REVIEW] Biosemiotics 2 (3):291-302.
    Umerez’s analysis made me aware of the fundamental differences in the culture of physics and molecular biology and the culture of semiotics from which the new field of biosemiotics arose. These cultures also view histories differently. Considering the evolutionary span and the many hierarchical levels of organization that their models must cover, models at different levels will require different observables and different meanings for common words, like symbol, interpretation, and language. These models as well as their histories should be viewed (...)
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  6.  72
    N. Sukumar (2013). The Atom in a Molecule as a Mereological Construct in Chemistry. Foundations of Chemistry 15 (3):303-309.
    In this paper I discuss some consequences and manifestations of a mereology of structured wholes in chemistry, with particular reference to the concept of atoms in molecules.
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  7.  13
    Huib Looren de Jong (2006). Explicating Pluralism: Where the Mind to Molecule Pathway Gets Off the Track—Reply to Bickle. Synthese 151 (3):435-443.
    It is argued that John Bickle’s Ruthless Reductionism is flawed as an account of the practice of neuroscience. Examples from genetics and linguistics suggest, first, that not every mind-brain link or gene-phenotype link qualifies as a reduction or as a complete explanation, and, second, that the higher (psychological) level of analysis is not likely to disappear as neuroscience progresses. The most plausible picture of the evolving sciences of the mind-brain seems a patchwork of multiple connections and partial explanations, linking anatomy, (...)
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  8.  6
    Robin Le Poidevin (2000). Space and the Chiral Molecule. In Nalini Bhushan & Stuart Rosenfeld (eds.), Of Minds and Molecules: New Philosophical Perspectives on Chemistry. New York: Oxford University Press
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  9. Jeremy Waldron (2007). Pettit's Molecule. In Michael Smith, Robert Goodin & Geoffrey Geoffrey (eds.), Common Minds. Oxford 143.
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  10.  8
    Petr Karlovský (1986). Kinetics of Circular DNA Molecule Digestion by Restriction Endonuclease Computation of Kinetic Constants From Time Dependence of Fragment Concentrations. Acta Biotheoretica 35 (4):279-292.
    A model for kinetics of circular substrate cleavage by restriction endonuclease was formulated. The aim of the analysis of the model was to extract kinetic constants for all target sites from time- dependence of fragment concentration in reaction products. That was proved to be possible for molecules with an odd number of fragments only. A symmetry of the molecules with an even number of fragment is the cause. A solution for molecules with an odd number of fragments was found and (...)
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  11.  31
    Mariam Thalos (2008). Molecule-for-Molecule Duplication. Teorema: International Journal of Philosophy 27 (3):103-114.
  12.  4
    Harold Morowitz (2007). My Favorite Molecule. Complexity 13 (2):8-9.
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  13.  1
    Vasudha Aggarwal & Taekjip Ha (2014). Single-Molecule Pull-Down for New-Age Biochemistry. Bioessays 36 (11):1109-1119.
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  14.  4
    Eric Kubli (1992). My Favorite Molecule. The Sex‐Peptide. Bioessays 14 (11):779-784.
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  15.  1
    Harry R. Matthews (1993). My Favourite Molecule: Polyamines, Chromatin Structure and Transcription. Bioessays 15 (8):561-566.
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  16.  13
    Huib L. de Jong (2006). Explicating Pluralism: Where the Mind to Molecule Pathway Gets Off the Track - Reply to Bickle. Synthese 151 (3):435-443.
    It is argued that John Bickle’s Ruthless Reductionism is flawed as an account of the practice of neuroscience. Examples from genetics and linguistics suggest, first, that not every mind-brain link or gene-phenotype link qualifies as a reduction or as a complete explanation, and, second, that the higher (psychological) level of analysis is not likely to disappear as neuroscience progresses. The most plausible picture of the evolving sciences of the mind-brain seems a patchwork of multiple connections and partial explanations, linking anatomy, (...)
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  17.  1
    Myriam Scheidecker Chevallier (1997). L'hypothèse d'Avogrado (1811) Et d'Ampère (1814): La Distinction Atome/Molécule Et la Théorie de la Combinaison Chimique/The Hypothesis of Avogadro (1811) and Ampère (1814): The Atom/Molecule Distinction and the Theory of Chemical Combination. [REVIEW] Revue d'Histoire des Sciences 50 (1):159-194.
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  18.  5
    Huib Looren De Jong (2006). Explicating Pluralism: Where the Mind to Molecule Pathway Gets Off the Track: Reply to Bickle. Synthese 151 (3):435 - 443.
    It is argued that John Bickle's Ruthless Reductionism is flawed as an account of the practice of neuroscience. Examples from genetics and linguistics suggest, first, that not every mind-brain link or gene-phenotype link qualifies as a reduction or as a complete explanation, and, second, that the higher (psychological) level of analysis is not likely to disappear as neuroscience progresses. The most plausible picture of the evolving sciences of the mind-brain seems a patchwork of multiple connections and partial explanations, linking anatomy, (...)
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  19.  1
    Rolf Kemler & Masayuki Ozawa (1989). Uvomorulin‐Catenin Complex: Cytoplasmic Anchorage of a Ca2+‐Dependent Cell Adhesion Molecule. Bioessays 11 (4):88-91.
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  20.  1
    Eleonora Cresto (2011). How DNA Became an Important Molecule Controversies at the Origins of Molecular Biology. In Oscar Nudler (ed.), Controversy Spaces: A Model of Scientific and Philosophical Change. John Benjamins Pub. Co. 10--135.
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  21.  1
    Eleonora Cresto (2011). How DNA Became an Important Molecule. In Oscar Nudler (ed.), Controversy Spaces: A Model of Scientific and Philosophical Change. John Benjamins Pub. Co. 14.
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  22.  1
    Ernst J. Woltering & Truus de Vrije (1995). Ethylene: A Tiny Molecule with Great Potential. Bioessays 17 (4):287-290.
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  23.  1
    F. W. Turek (1997). Melatonin: Pathway From Obscure Molecule to International Fame. Perspectives in Biology and Medicine 41 (1):8-20.
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  24.  1
    Barry G. Hall (1990). My Favorite Molecule: Directed Evolution of a Bacterial Operon. Bioessays 12 (11):551-558.
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  25.  1
    Stanley Shostak (2012). DNA: A Graphic Guide to the Molecule That Shook the World. By Israel Rosenfield, Edward Ziff, and Borin van Loon. The European Legacy 17 (5):711 - 712.
    The European Legacy, Volume 17, Issue 5, Page 711-712, August 2012.
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  26. Laura W. Burrus (1994). Wnt-1 as a Short-Range Signaling Molecule. Bioessays 16 (3):155-157.
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  27. Tenney Davis (1936). Une Étape de la Notion d'Atome Et de Molécule; Gaudin by Marcel Delépine. [REVIEW] Isis: A Journal of the History of Science 25:471-473.
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  28. Bernadette Hannigan (1996). Death Hath ten Thousand Several Doors, Some More Open Than Others. Understanding Ageing . Cambridge University Press. 207pp. £35 , £14.95 . ISBN 0-521-417880 , 0-521-48702-2 . The CD4 Molecule. Roles in T-Ly. [REVIEW] Bioessays 18 (10):853-853.
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  29. B. Hannigan (1996). The CD4 Molecule. Roles in T-Lymphocytes and in HIV Disease Edited by DR Littman. Bioessays 18:853-853.
     
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  30. Masakazu Hatanaka (1990). My Favourite Molecule: Discovery of the Nucleolar Targeting Signal. Bioessays 12 (3):143-148.
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  31. Lawrence B. Hendry, Francis H. Witham & Orville L. Chapman (1977). Gene Regulation: The Involvement of Stereochemical Recognition in DNA-Small Molecule Interactions. Perspectives in Biology and Medicine 21 (1):120-130.
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  32. Christopher A. Hunter (1996). My Favourite Molecule: Sequence-Dependent DNA Structure. Bioessays 18 (2):157-162.
     
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  33. Sue Kenwrick & Patrick Doherty (1998). Neural Cell Adhesion Molecule L1: Relating Disease to Function. Bioessays 20 (8):668-675.
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  34. Minoru S. H. Ko (1992). Problems and Paradigms: Induction Mechanism of a Single Gene Molecule: Stochastic or Deterministic? Bioessays 14 (5):341-346.
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  35. D. R. Littman & Bernadette Hannigan (1996). The CD4 Molecule. Roles in T-Lymphocytes and in HIV Disease. Bioessays 18 (10):853-853.
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  36. E. F. Mortimer & L. O. F. Amaral (1999). A Conceptual Profile for Molecule and Molecular Structure. In Nikolaos Psarros & Kōstas Gavroglou (eds.), Ars Mutandi: Issues in Philosophy and History of Chemistry. Leipziger Universitätsverlag
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  37. Roger Morris (1992). My Favourite Molecule. Thy-1, the Enigmatic Extrovert on the Neuronal Surface. Bioessays 14 (10):715-722.
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  38. C. Daniel Riggs (1997). My Favourite Molecule: Meiotin‐1: The Meiosis Readiness Factor? Bioessays 19 (10):925-931.
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  39. Myriam Scheidecker-Chevallier (1997). The Hypothesis of Avogadro (1811) and Ampere (1814): The Atom/Molecule Distinction and the Theory of Chemical Combination. [REVIEW] Revue d'Histoire des Sciences 50 (1).
     
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  40. Keiko U. Torii & Xing‐Wang Deng (1995). Regulation of Plant Form: Identification of a Molecule Controlling Cell Expansion. Bioessays 17 (5):383-386.
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  41.  35
    Jean-Pierre Llored (2010). Mereology and Quantum Chemistry: The Approximation of Molecular Orbital. [REVIEW] Foundations of Chemistry 12 (3):203-221.
    Mulliken proposed an Aufbauprinzip for the molecules on the basis of molecular spectroscopy while establishing, point by point, his concept of molecular orbit. It is the concept of electronic state which becomes the lever for his attribution of electronic configurations to a molecule. In 1932, the concept of orbit was transmuted into that of the molecular orbital to integrate the probabilistic approach of Born and to achieve quantitative accuracy. On the basis of the quantum works of Hund, Wigner, Lennard-Jones (...)
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  42.  37
    Paul R. Thagard (2002). How Molecules Matter to Mental Computation. Philosophy of Science 69 (3):497-518.
    Almost all computational models of the mind and brain ignore details about neurotransmitters, hormones, and other molecules. The neglect of neurochemistry in cognitive science would be appropriate if the computational properties of brains relevant to explaining mental functioning were in fact electrical rather than chemical. But there is considerable evidence that chemical complexity really does matter to brain computation, including the role of proteins in intracellular computation, the operations of synapses and neurotransmitters, and the effects of neuromodulators such as hormones. (...)
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  43.  44
    Jurgen Schroder (1998). Emergence: Non-Deducibility or Downwards Causation? Philosophical Quarterly 48 (193):433-52.
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  44.  55
    Alex Rosenberg (2001). On Multiple Realization and the Special Sciences. Journal of Philosophy 98 (7):365-373.
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  45.  31
    N. Georgalis (1994). Asymmetry of Access to Intentional States. Erkenntnis 40 (2):185-211.
  46.  10
    Xiyan Li & Michael Snyder (2011). Metabolites as Global Regulators: A New View of Protein Regulation. Bioessays 33 (7):485-489.
  47.  11
    R. Garth Kidd (2011). Elements of the Third Kind and the Spin-Dependent Chemical Force. Foundations of Chemistry 13 (2):109-119.
  48.  2
    José Luis González Recio (1993). El programa reduccionista en las Ciencias de la vida (1910-1944). Logos 27:111-126.
    The certainty that natural phenomena and processes could be represented in a physical space ruled by Euclidean geometry was a fundamental epistemological assumption of theoretical creation in classical science. The possibility of a mathematical analysis of the continuum ensured an intuitive, pictorial description of mobile trajectories as studied in dynamics, as well as a precise determination of the effects generated within causal relations. These convictions and assumptions had to be reviewed when the Plank action quantum forced the development of a (...)
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  49.  2
    Christopher Cherniak (1991). Meta-Neuroanatomy: The Myth of the Unbounded Mind/Brain. In Evandro Agazzi & Alberto Cordero (eds.), Philosophy and the Origin and Evolution of the Universe. Norwell: Kluwer 219--252.
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  50.  1
    Karel Klepárník & Petr Boček (2010). Electrophoresis Today and Tomorrow: Helping Biologists' Dreams Come True. Bioessays 32 (3):218-226.
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