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  1. Molly Cochran (2010). Dewey as an International Thinker. In , The Cambridge Companion to Dewey. Cambridge University Press.
     
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  2. Molly Cochran (2010). Introduction. In , The Cambridge Companion to Dewey. Cambridge University Press.
     
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  3. Molly Cochran (ed.) (2010). The Cambridge Companion to Dewey. Cambridge University Press.
    John Dewey (1859-1952) was a major figure of the American cultural and intellectual landscape in the first half of the twentieth century. While not the originator of American pragmatism, he was instrumental to its articulation as a philosophy and the spread of its influence beyond philosophy to other disciplines. His prolific writings encompass metaphysics, philosophy of mind, cognitive science, psychology, moral philosophy, the philosophies of religion, art, and education, and democratic political and international theory. The contributors to this Companion examine (...)
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  4. Molly Cochran (2001). Rorty's Neo-Pragmatism: Some Implications for International Relations Theory. In Matthew Festenstein & Simon Thompson (eds.), Richard Rorty: Critical Dialogues. Polity Press. 176--199.
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  5. Molly Cochran (1999). Normative Theory in International Relations: A Pragmatic Approach. Cambridge University Press.
    Molly Cochran offers an account of the development of normative theory in international relations over the past two decades. In particular, she analyzes the tensions between cosmopolitan and communitarian approaches to international ethics, paying attention to differences in their treatments of a concept of the person, the moral standing of states and the scope of moral arguments. The book draws connections between this debate and the tension between foundationalist and antifoundationalist thinking and offers an argument for a pragmatic approach to (...)
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