Search results for 'Molly Meijer Wertheimer' (try it on Scholar)

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  1.  7
    Molly Meijer Wertheimer (2000). On Feminizing the Philosophy of Rhetoric. Philosophy and Rhetoric 33 (3).
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  2.  8
    Agnes Verbiest (1999). Molly Meijer Wertheimer (Eds.), Listening to Their Voices: The Rhetorical Activities of Historical Women (1997). Argumentation 13 (2):238-242.
  3.  1
    D. King, Michael Wertheimer, Heidi Keller & Kevin Crochetiere (1994). The Legacy of Max Wertheimer and Gestalt Psychology. Social Research 61:907-936.
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  4.  19
    Alan Wertheimer (1996). Exploitation. Princeton University Press.
    In this book, Alan Wertheimer seeks to identify when a transaction or relationship can be properly regarded as exploitative--and not oppressive, manipulative, or morally deficient in some other way--and explores the moral weight of taking ...
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  5. Alan Wertheimer (2006). Consent to Sexual Relations. Law and Philosophy 25 (2):267-287.
    When does a woman give valid consent to sexual relations? When does her consent render it morally or legally permissible for a man to have sexual relations with her? Why is sexual consent generally regarded as an issue about female consent? And what is the moral significance of consent? These are some of the questions discussed in this important book, which will appeal to a wide readership in philosophy, law, and the social sciences. Alan Wertheimer develops a theory of (...)
     
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  6.  75
    Alan Wertheimer & Matt Zwolinski, Exploitation. Mind.
    What is the basis for arguing that a volunteer army exploits citizens who lack civilian career opportunities? How do we determine that a doctor who has sex with his patients is exploiting them? In this book, Alan Wertheimer seeks to identify when a transaction or relationship can be properly regarded as exploitative--and not oppressive, manipulative, or morally deficient in some other way--and explores the moral weight of taking unfair advantage. Among the first political philosophers to examine this important topic (...)
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  7. David Benatar, Cheshire Calhoun, Louise Collins, John Corvino, Yolanda Estes, John Finnis, Deirdre Golash, Alan Goldman, Greta Christina, Raja Halwani, Christopher Hamilton, Eva Feder Kittay, Howard Klepper, Andrew Koppelman, Stanley Kurtz, Thomas Mappes, Joan Mason-Grant, Janice Moulton, Thomas Nagel, Jerome Neu, Martha Nussbaum, Alan Soble, Sallie Tisdale, Alan Wertheimer, Robin West & Karol Wojtyla (2007). Philosophy of Sex: Contemporary Readings. Rowman & Littlefield Publishers.
    This book's thirty essays explore philosophically the nature and morality of sexual perversion, cybersex, masturbation, homosexuality, contraception, same-sex marriage, promiscuity, pedophilia, date rape, sexual objectification, teacher-student relationships, pornography, and prostitution. Authors include Martha Nussbaum, Thomas Nagel, Alan Goldman, John Finnis, Sallie Tisdale, Robin West, Alan Wertheimer, John Corvino, Cheshire Calhoun, Jerome Neu, and Alan Soble, among others. A valuable resource for sex researchers as well as undergraduate courses in the philosophy of sex.
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  8. Alan Wertheimer (2010). Consent to Sexual Relations. Cambridge University Press.
    When does a woman give valid consent to sexual relations? When does her consent render it morally or legally permissible for a man to have sexual relations with her? Why is sexual consent generally regarded as an issue about female consent? And what is the moral significance of consent? These are some of the questions discussed in this important book, which will appeal to a wide readership in philosophy, law, and the social sciences. Alan Wertheimer develops a theory of (...)
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  9. Alan Wertheimer (2003). Consent to Sexual Relations. Cambridge University Press.
    When does a woman give valid consent to sexual relations? When does her consent render it morally or legally permissible for a man to have sexual relations with her? Why is sexual consent generally regarded as an issue about female consent? And what is the moral significance of consent? These are some of the questions discussed in this important book, which will appeal to a wide readership in philosophy, law, and the social sciences. Alan Wertheimer develops a theory of (...)
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  10. Govind Persad, Alan Wertheimer & Ezekiel J. Emanuel (2009). Principles for Allocation of Scarce Medical Interventions. The Lancet 373 (9661):423--431.
    Allocation of very scarce medical interventions such as organs and vaccines is a persistent ethical challenge. We evaluate eight simple allocation principles that can be classified into four categories: treating people equally, favouring the worst-off, maximising total benefits, and promoting and rewarding social usefulness. No single principle is sufficient to incorporate all morally relevant considerations and therefore individual principles must be combined into multiprinciple allocation systems. We evaluate three systems: the United Network for Organ Sharing points systems, quality-adjusted life-years, and (...)
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  11. Roger Wertheimer (1974). Philosophy on Humanity. In R. L. Perkins (ed.), Abortion: Pro and Con. Schenkman
  12. Roger Wertheimer (2010). The Morality of Military Ethics Education. In Empowering Our Military Conscience.
    Professional Military Ethics Education (PMEE) must transmit and promote military professionalism, so it must continuously.
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  13. Max Wertheimer (1946). Productive Thinking. Philosophical Review 55 (3):298-300.
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  14.  60
    Franklin G. Miller & Alan Wertheimer (2007). Facing Up to Paternalism in Research Ethics. Hastings Center Report 37 (3):24-34.
    : Bioethicists have failed to understand the pervasively paternalistic character of research ethics. Not only is the overall structure of research review and regulation paternalistic in some sense; even the way informed consent is sought may imply paternalism. Paternalism has limits, however. Getting clear on the paternalism of research ethics may mean some kinds of prohibited research should be reassessed.
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  15.  13
    Alan Wertheimer (2010). Rethinking the Ethics of Clinical Research: Widening the Lens. Oxford University Press.
    Introduction -- Facing up to paternalism in research ethics -- Preface to a theory of consent transactions in research : beyond valid consent -- Should we worry about money? -- Exploitation in clinical research -- The interaction principle.
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  16.  7
    Alan Wertheimer (1990). Coercion. Princeton University Press.
    These paperback editions preserve the original texts of these important books while presenting them in durable paperback editions.
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  17.  8
    Florian Sense, Friederike Behrens, Rob R. Meijer & Hedderik Rijn (2016). An Individual's Rate of Forgetting Is Stable Over Time but Differs Across Materials. Topics in Cognitive Science 8 (1):305-321.
    One of the goals of computerized tutoring systems is to optimize the learning of facts. Over a hundred years of declarative memory research have identified two robust effects that can improve such systems: the spacing and the testing effect. By making optimal use of both and adjusting the system to the individual learner using cognitive models based on declarative memory theories, such systems consistently outperform traditional methods. This adjustment process is driven by a continuously updated estimate of the rate of (...)
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  18.  32
    Franklin G. Miller & Alan Wertheimer (eds.) (2010). The Ethics of Consent: Theory and Practice. Oxford University Press.
    This book assembles the contributions of a distinguished group of scholars concerning the ethics of consent in theory and practice.
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  19. Roger Wertheimer (1998). Constraining Condemning. Ethics 108 (3):489-501.
    Our culture is conflicted about morally judging and condemning. We can't avoid it altogether, yet many layfolk today are loathe to do it for reasons neither they nor philosophers well understand. Their resistance is often confused (by themselves and by theorists) with some species of antiobjectivism. But unlike a nonobjectivist, most people think that (a) for us to judge and condemn is generally (objectively) morally wrong , yet (b) for God to do so is (objectively) proper, and (c) so too (...)
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  20. Roger Wertheimer (1975). Are the Police Necessary? In E. Viano & J. Reiman (eds.), The Police in Society. D.C. Heath
  21.  8
    A. Wertheimer & F. G. Miller (2008). Payment for Research Participation: A Coercive Offer? Journal of Medical Ethics 34 (5):389-392.
    Payment for research participation has raised ethical concerns, especially with respect to its potential for coercion. We argue that characterising payment for research participation as coercive is misguided, because offers of benefit cannot constitute coercion. In this article we analyse the concept of coercion, refute mistaken conceptions of coercion and explain why the offer of payment for research participation is never coercive but in some cases may produce undue inducement.
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  22. Roger Wertheimer (2007). Reconnoitering Combatant Moral Equality. Journal of Military Ethics 6 (1):60-74.
    Contra Michael Walzer and Jeff McMahan, neither classical just war theory nor the contemporary rules of war require or support any notion of combatant moral equality. Nations rightly accept prohibitions against punishing enemy combatants without recognizing any legal or moral right of aggressors to kill. The notion of combatant moral equality has real import only in our interpersonal -- and intrapersonal -- attitudes, since the notion effectively preempts any ground for conscientious objection. Walzer is criticized for over-emphasizing our collective responses (...)
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  23.  31
    Franklin G. Miller & Alan Wertheimer (2011). The Fair Transaction Model of Informed Consent: An Alternative to Autonomous Authorization. Kennedy Institute of Ethics Journal 21 (3):201-218.
    Prevailing ethical thinking about informed consent to clinical research is characterized by theoretical confidence and practical disquiet. On the one hand, bioethicists are confident that informed consent is a fundamental norm. And, for the most part, they are confident that what makes consent to research valid is that it constitutes an autonomous authorization by the research participant. On the other hand, bioethicists are uneasy about the quality of consent in practice. One major source of this disquiet is substantial evidence of (...)
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  24. G. Owen Schaefer & Alan Wertheimer (2011). The Right to Withdraw From Research. Kennedy Institute of Ethics Journal 20 (4):329-352.
    It is universally accepted that participants in biomedical research have the right to withdraw from participation at any time, except, perhaps, when withdrawal would constitute a threat to their health or the health of others. The right to withdraw is encoded in nearly every document on the requirements for ethical conduct of research on humans, including the U.S. Code of Federal Regulations governing all federally-funded research, the Common Rule (45 CFR 46); the Declaration of Helsinki (WMA 2008); the 2002 research (...)
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  25.  64
    Roger Wertheimer, Understanding Speciesism -2005.
    People espousing human moral equality encompassing every conspecific have been unumbrageous being labeled ‘speciesists’ and likened to Nazis and Klansmen, despite the insult’s being indefensible, and, if meant seriously, enraging. Perhaps their equanimity is unruffled because anti-speciesist acquaintances are remarkably chummier with them than with real racists. -/- Anti-speciesists confuse two questions: (1) Is the bare fact of an individual’s being a human in itself a reason for us humans to deal with it as we'd like to be dealt with? (...)
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  26.  11
    Bruno Verschuere, Adriaan Spruyt, Ewout H. Meijer & Henry Otgaar (2011). The Ease of Lying. Consciousness and Cognition 20 (3):908-911.
    Brain imaging studies suggest that truth telling constitutes the default of the human brain and that lying involves intentional suppression of the predominant truth response. By manipulating the truth proportion in the Sheffield lie test, we investigated whether the dominance of the truth response is malleable. Results showed that frequent truth telling made lying more difficult, and that frequent lying made lying easier. These results implicate that the accuracy of lie detection tests may be improved by increasing the dominance of (...)
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  27.  8
    May-May Meijer & Theo Schuyt (2005). Corporate Social Performance as a Bottom Line for Consumers. Business and Society 44 (4):442-461.
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  28.  45
    Jamie Ward & Peter Meijer (2010). Visual Experiences in the Blind Induced by an Auditory Sensory Substitution Device. Consciousness and Cognition 19 (1):492-500.
    In this report, the phenomenology of two blind users of a sensory substitution device – “The vOICe” – that converts visual images to auditory signals is described. The users both report detailed visual phenomenology that developed within months of immersive use and has continued to evolve over a period of years. This visual phenomenology, although triggered through use of The vOICe, is likely to depend not only on online visualization of the auditory signal but also on the users’ previous (albeit (...)
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  29. Roger Wertheimer (1983). Understanding Retribution. Criminal Justice Ethics 2 (2):19-38.
  30. Roger Wertheimer (2010). The Moral Singularity of Military Professionalism. In Empowering Our Military Conscience.
    Neither M. Walzer's collectivist conception of the "moral equality" of combatants, nor its antithetical individualist conceptions of responsibility are compatible with the ethos of military professionalism and its conception(s) of the responsibility of military professionals for service in an unjust war.
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  31. Roger Wertheimer (1999). Quotation Apposition. Philosophical Quarterly 50 (197):514-519.
    Analyses of quotation have assumed that quotations are referring expressions while disagreeing over details. That assumption is unnecessary and unacceptable in its implications. It entails a quasi-Parmenidean impossibility of meaningfully denying the meaningfulness or referential function of anything uttered, for it implies that: 'Kqxf' is not a meaningful expression 'The' is not a referring expression are, if meaningful, false. It also implies that ill formed constructions like: 'The' is 'the' are well formed tautologies. Such sentences make apparent the need for (...)
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  32. Roger Wertheimer (1993). Socratic Scepticism. Metaphilosophy 24 (4):344-62.
    The Socratic Paradox (that only Socrates is wise, and only because only he recognizes our lack of wisdom) is explained, elaborated and defended. His philosophical scepticism is distinguished from others (Pyrrhonian, Cartesian, Humean, Kripkean Wittgenstein, etc.): the doubt concerns our understanding of our beliefs, not our justification for them; the doubt is a posteriori and inductive, not a priori. Post-Socratic philosophy confirms this scepticism: contra-Descartes, our ideas are not transparent to us; contra-Verificationism, no criterion distinguishes sense from nonsense. The import (...)
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  33. Roger Wertheimer (1971). Understanding the Abortion Argument. Philosophy and Public Affairs 1 (1):67-95.
    critical analyses of the arguments and attitudes favoring the various popular datings of the inception of a human being's life.
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  34.  13
    Alan Wertheimer (2008). Exploitation in Clinical Research. In Ezekiel J. Emanuel (ed.), The Oxford Textbook of Clinical Research Ethics. Oxford University Press 201--10.
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  35.  34
    Roger Wertheimer, In Defense of Speciesism-1979.
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  36.  7
    David Wasserman & Alan Wertheimer (2014). In Defense of Bunkering. American Journal of Bioethics 14 (9):42-43.
  37.  26
    Alan Wertheimer, Joseph Millum & G. Owen Schaefer (2010). Why Adopt a Maximin Theory of Exploitation? American Journal of Bioethics 10 (6):38-39.
  38.  30
    Roger Wertheimer, Forms, Facts &Truth.
  39.  2
    Max Wertheimer (1934). On Truth. Social Research 1 (2):135-146.
  40. Alan Wertheimer (1992). Two Questions About Surrogacy and Exploitation. Philosophy and Public Affairs 21 (3):211-239.
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  41.  1
    Alan Wertheimer & Franklin G. Miller (2008). Payment for Research Participation: A Coercive Offer? Journal of Medical Ethics 34 (5):389-392.
    Payment for research participation has raised ethical concerns, especially with respect to its potential for coercion. We argue that characterising payment for research participation as coercive is misguided, because offers of benefit cannot constitute coercion. In this article we analyse the concept of coercion, refute mistaken conceptions of coercion and explain why the offer of payment for research participation is never coercive but in some cases may produce undue inducement.
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  42.  29
    Roger Wertheimer (2015). Jus Ante Bellum. In George Lucas (ed.), Routledge Handbook of Military Ethics. 54-68.
  43.  2
    Michael Wertheimer (1953). An Investigation of the "Randomness" of Threshold Measurements. Journal of Experimental Psychology 45 (5):294.
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  44.  11
    A. Wertheimer & F. G. Miller (2014). There Are No Coercive Offers. Journal of Medical Ethics 40 (9):592-593.
    John McMillan's article raises numerous important points about the ethics of surgical castration of sex offenders.1 In this commentary, we focus solely on and argue against the claim that the offer of release from detention conditional upon surgical castration is a coercive offer that compromises the validity of the offender's consent. We take no view on the question as to whether castration for sex offenders is ethically permissible. But, we reject the claim that it is ethically permissible only if competing (...)
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  45. Roger Wertheimer (1998). Identity: Logic, Ontology, Epistemology. Philosophy 73 (2):179-193.
    The identity "relation" is misconceived since the syntax of "=" is misconceived as a relative term. Actually, "=" is syncategorematic; it forms (true) sentences with a nonpredicative syntax from pairs of (coreferring) flanking names, much as "&" forms (true) conjunctive sentences from pairs of (true) flanking sentences. In the conaming structure, nothing is predicated of the subject, other than, implicitly, its being so conamed. An identity sentence has both an objectual reading as a necessity about what is named, and also (...)
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  46. Roger Wertheimer (1984). Understanding Blackmun's Argument: The Reasoning in Roe V. Wade. In J. Garfield & P. Hennessy (eds.), Abortion: Moral and Legal Perspectives. University of Massachusetts
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  47.  12
    Alan Wertheimer (2013). Should 'Nudge' Be Salvaged? Journal of Medical Ethics 39 (8):498-499.
    Policy makers are understandably interested—for both political and moral reasons—in following Thaler and Sunstein's recommendation to use ‘choice architecture’ , or other ‘nudges’, to promote desirable behaviour in ways that are allegedly compatible with personal freedom.1 Yashar Saghai's intricate analysis shows that simply maintaining the target's choice-set is insufficient to preserve the target's freedom when the nudge bypasses the target's deliberative capacities—as it is specifically designed to do.2 In his friendly amendment to Thaler and Sunstein's project, Saghai advances a (...)
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  48. Max Wertheimer (1923). Laws of Organization in Perceptual Forms. Psycologische Forschung 4:301-350.
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  49. Roger Wertheimer (2007). The Relevance of Speciesism to Life Sciences Practices. In Fred Adams (ed.), Journal of Philosophical Research. Philosophy Document Center 27-38.
    Properly understood speciesism regards membership in one's own species (e.g., being a fellow human being) as sufficient for sharing one's own moral status, but NOT as being necessary. Speciesism is consistent with any of a great range of attitudes toward alter-specific animals. When nonhuman animals are accorded a lesser moral status it is not per se because they are not human.
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  50.  2
    A. Wertheimer (2014). Non-Completion and Informed Consent. Journal of Medical Ethics 40 (2):127-130.
    There is a good deal of biomedical research that does not produce scientifically useful data because it fails to recruit a sufficient number of subjects. This fact is typically not disclosed to prospective subjects. In general, the guidance about consent concerns the information required to make intelligent self-interested decisions and ignores some of the information required for intelligent altruistic decisions. Bioethics has worried about the ‘therapeutic misconception’, but has ignored the ‘completion misconception’. This article argues that, other things being equal, (...)
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