Search results for 'Monarchy Philsoophy' (try it on Scholar)

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  1. Eleanor Curran (2007). Reclaiming the Rights of the Hobbesian Subject. Palgrave Macmillan.score: 60.0
    'There are no substantive rights for subjects in Hobbes's political theory, only bare freedoms without correlated duties to protect them'. This orthodoxy of Hobbes scholarship and its Hohfeldian assumptions are challenged by Curran who develops an argument that Hobbes provides claim rights for subjects against each other and (indirect) protection of the right to self-preservation by sovereign duties. The underlying theory, she argues, is not a theory of natural rights but rather, a modern, secular theory of rights, with something to (...)
     
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  2. Dean Garratt & Heather Piper (2003). Citizenship Education and the Monarchy: Examining the Contradictions. British Journal of Educational Studies 51 (2):128 - 148.score: 24.0
    This paper addresses the teaching of citizenship in schools and focuses on the monarchy as an example of one issue often ignored within curriculum discourse. We argue that to conflate subjecthood and citizenship in unacknowledged ways may serve to perpetuate the status quo and is potentially unhelpful to the development of young people's critical thinking.
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  3. Aziz al-Azmeh (2010). Monotheistic Monarchy. Journal for the Study of Religions and Ideologies 4 (10):133-149.score: 24.0
    In the first part of this text, the author attempts to demonstrate that sacral kingship might, in anthropological terms, be regarded an Elementary Form of socio-political life; not an autonomous elementary form, but one falling under the category of rulership. The reference to the anthropological notion of Elementary Forms renders virtually irrelevant the rigidity with which categorical distinctions are made between polytheistic and monotheistic kingship, as well as any civilisational divisions that might be imagined between Orient and Occident. The second (...)
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  4. Rebecca Ard Boone (2007). War, Domination, and the Monarchy of France: Claude de Seyssel and the Language of Politics in the Renaissance. Brill.score: 21.0
    In medias res: the life of Claude de Seyssel -- The scholar diplomat -- The translator of histories -- Seyssel in Italy : a scholar looks at war -- The scholar and the state -- Seyssel, the church, and the ideal prelate.
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  5. Yung-chi Ho (1935). The Origin of Parliamentary Sovereignty or "Mixed" Monarchy. Shanghai, the Commercial Press, Ltd..score: 21.0
     
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  6. Michael Billig (1988). Rhetorical and Historical Aspects of Attitudes: The Case of the British Monarchy. Philosophical Psychology 1 (1):83 – 103.score: 18.0
    This paper seeks to develop the rhetorical approach to the study of social psychology, by looking at the rhetorical aspects of British attitudes towards the monarchy. The rhetorical approach stresses that attitudes are stances in public controversy and, as such, must be understood in their wider historical and argumentative context. Changes in this context can lead to changes in attitudinal expression, such as the phenomenon of Taking the Side of the Other, which should be distinguished from the sort of (...)
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  7. M. Tunick (1991). Hegel's Justification of Hereditary Monarchy. History of Political Thought 12 (3):481.score: 18.0
    Hegel's Rechtsphilosophie is metaphysical, to be sure; but it is also political. To help show this I will make sense, and show the plausibility and relevance, of what appears to be one of the most metaphysical (and bizarre) claims to be found in Hegel's political philosophy: his justification of hereditary monarchy. While among Hegel scholars Hegel's theory of constitutional monarchy has been a focus of heated debate over whether Hegel is a liberal or a conservative; and has recently (...)
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  8. J. Jennings (1991). Nationalist Ideas in the Early Years of the July Monarchy: Armand Carrel and "Le National". History of Political Thought 12 (3):497.score: 18.0
    This article is concerned primarily to re-discover the contours of a doctrine -- Winock's �nationalisme ouvert� -- that (however unsuccessfully and for however short a time) intended to combine liberalism and nationalism. To that end it will concentrate upon the period that surrounded the birth of the July Monarchy in 1830 and specifically upon the writings of Armand Carrel, founder (with Thiers and Mignet) of Le National and supporter of the nationalist causes in Belgium, Poland and Italy. Other writers (...)
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  9. George E. Mendenhall (1975). The Monarchy. Interpretation 29 (2):155-170.score: 18.0
    The development of the Israelite Monarchy followed the model of a typical Syro-Hittite state and introduced a paganization into the political and social history of Israel with fateful and lasting consequences.
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  10. J. Miller (1998). Aristotle's Paradox of Monarchy and the Biographical Tradition. History of Political Thought 19 (4):501-516.score: 18.0
    Scholarly controversies over Aristotle's ‘paradox of monarchy’ may be partially resolved by examining the biographical evidence of Aristotle's involvement in Macedonian politics. This evidence suggests Aristotle worked as an agent of Macedon in Athens, and his statements on monarchy were intentionally contradictory due to his own dangerous and ambiguous political status in Athens.
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  11. Andrea Radasanu (2010). Montesquieu on Moderation, Monarchy and Reform. History of Political Thought 31 (2):283-308.score: 18.0
    Montesquieu's respect for moderation is almost universally acknowledged, but not very well understood. In recent scholarship, his moderation has been interpreted as inclusive and pluralistic with a view to the range of regimes that are hospitable to liberty. This paper challenges this currently dominant interpretation of Montesquieu by revisiting his understanding of moderation. On reflection, he does not simply discourage radical change, he even provides advice as to when and how such change is to be enacted. French absolute monarchy (...)
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  12. J. W. McKenna (1965). Henry VI of England and the Dual Monarchy: Aspects of Royal Political Propaganda, 1422-1432. Journal of the Warburg and Courtauld Institutes 28:145-162.score: 15.0
  13. Cary J. Nederman & Tatiana V. GÓMez (2002). Between Republic and Monarchy? Liberty, Security, and the Kingdom of France in Machiavelli. Midwest Studies in Philosophy 26 (1):82–93.score: 15.0
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  14. Alex Rosenberg (1992). Causation, Probability and the Monarchy. American Philosophical Quarterly 29 (4):305 - 318.score: 15.0
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  15. Daniel Ogden (2004). Ptolemaic Ideology R. A. Hazzard: Imagination of a Monarchy. Studies in Ptolemaic Propaganda . ( Phoenix Supplementary Volume 37.) Pp. X + 244. Toronto: University of Toronto Press, 2000. Cased. Isbn: 0-8020-4313-. [REVIEW] The Classical Review 54 (02):472-.score: 15.0
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  16. Peter Milward (2013). The Society of Jesus in Ireland, Scotland, and England, 1589–1597: Building the Faith of Saint Peter Upon the King of Spain's Monarchy. By Thomas M. McCoog, S.J., Pp.Xiv, 467, Farnham, Surrey, Ashgate, 2012, £75.00. [REVIEW] Heythrop Journal 54 (3):507-508.score: 15.0
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  17. Steven Pincus (2000). The Making of a Great Power? Universal Monarchy, Political Economy, and the Transformation of English Political Culture. The European Legacy 5 (4):531-545.score: 15.0
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  18. Günter Wollstein (1984). Frederick the Great. A Monarchy of Contradictions. Philosophy and History 17 (2):179-179.score: 15.0
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  19. Harold A. Ellis (1989). Montesquieu Modern Politics-The'spirit of the Laws'and the Problem of Modern Monarchy in Old-Regime France. History of Political Thought 10 (4):665-700.score: 15.0
     
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  20. Geraint Parry (1982). Book Review:John Locke and the Theory of Sovereignty: Mixed Monarchy and the Right of Resistance in the Political Thought of the English Revolution. Julian H. Franklin. [REVIEW] Ethics 92 (2):358-.score: 15.0
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  21. Volker Gerhardt (1989). The State as Machine. On the Political Imagery of Absolute Monarchy. Philosophy and History 22 (1):51-53.score: 15.0
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  22. Hans-Hermann Hoppe (1995). The Political Economy of Monarchy and Democracy, and the Idea of a Natural Order. Journal of Libertarian Studies 11 (2):94-121.score: 15.0
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  23. Dennis J. McCarthy (1973). The Inauguration of Monarchy in Israel A Form-Critical Study of I Samuel 8–12. Interpretation 27 (4):401-412.score: 15.0
    The kingship has been integrated into the fundamental relationship between Yahweh and the people and that relationship reaffirmed. A crisis has been described and resolved in narrative and theological terms, and a new era can begin.
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  24. Andrew Mansfield (2012). Aristocratic Reform and the Extirpation of Parliament in Early Georgian Britain: Andrew Michael Ramsay and French Ideas of Monarchy. History of European Ideas 40 (2):1-19.score: 15.0
    In An Essay upon Civil Government , Andrew Michael Ramsay mounted a sustained attack upon the development throughout English history of popular government. According to Ramsay, popular involvement in sovereignty had led to the decline of society and the revolutions of the seventeenth century. In his own time, Parliament had become a despotic instrument of government, riven with faction and driven by a multiplicity of laws that manifested a widespread corruption in the state. Ramsay's solution to this degeneracy was the (...)
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  25. Teodora Daniela Sechel (2012). Medical Knowledge and the Improvement of Vernacular Languages in the Habsburg Monarchy: A Case Study From Transylvania (1770–1830). [REVIEW] Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part C 43 (3):720-729.score: 15.0
    In all European countries, the eighteenth century was characterised by efforts to improve the vernaculars. The Transylvanian case study shows how both codified medical language and ordinary language were constructed and enriched by a large number of medical books and brochures. The publication of medical literature in Central European vernacular languages in order to popularise new medical knowledge was a comprehensive programme, designed on the one hand by intellectual, political and religious elites who urged the improvement of the fatherland and (...)
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  26. Peter G. Stillman (2006). Monarchy, Disorder, and Politics in The Isle of Pines. Utopian Studies 17 (1):147 - 175.score: 15.0
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  27. Leslie Topp (2007). Psychiatric Institutions, Their Architecture, and the Politics of Regional Autonomy in the Austro-Hungarian Monarchy. Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part C 38 (4):733-755.score: 15.0
    This paper examines the planning process and architecture of two public psychiatric institutions built around 1900 in Trieste and Lower Austria. From 1864, the building of new asylums was the responsibility of Crown land governments, which by the end of the nineteenth century had emerged as sites of power and self-presentation by minority groups and new political parties. At the same time, the area of asylum planning was establishing itself as a branch of asylum psychiatry and promoting the idea of (...)
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  28. Cecilia Carnino (2009). Rereading Franco Venturi's Eighteenth Century: Absolutist Monarchy Between Reform and Revolt. History of European Ideas 35 (1):11-23.score: 15.0
    This article has two aims. The first is to outline Franco Venturi's ideas on absolutist monarchy and to highlight new analytical perspectives of his interest in the achievements of the reformist sovereigns. The second is to help shed light on his complex intellectual life. The article begins by underlining how Venturi's historical insights make it difficult to single out a unanimous understanding of absolutist monarchy, and then develops by reconstructing different notions of monarchy. These are: monarchy (...)
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  29. Andrew Erskine (1991). Hellenistic Monarchy and Roman Political Invective. Classical Quarterly 41 (01):106-.score: 15.0
    The origins of the well-known hatred for the nomen regis at Rome are in this way explained by Cicero in the De Republica, written in the late 50s b.c. Tarquinius Superbus, Rome's last king, so traumatised the Roman people that the term rex still had a potent effect almost five hundred years after his downfall. Many modern scholars would accept that the Roman hatred of kings was deep-rooted and intense, and it is often called upon to explain Roman behaviour. This (...)
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  30. R. H. Helmholz (1985). Kenneth Pennington, Pope and Bishops: The Papal Monarchy in the Twelfth and Thirteenth Centuries. (The Middle Ages.) Philadelphia: University of Pennsylvania Press, 1984. Pp. Xiii, 225. $30. [REVIEW] Speculum 60 (4):1011-1013.score: 15.0
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  31. Cornelia Lüdecke (2006). 'Climate is Monarchy,Weather is Anarchy': Victorian Meteorology. [REVIEW] Metascience 15 (1):97-99.score: 15.0
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  32. Gilbert Meilaender (1978). A Little Monarchy. Thought 53 (4):401-415.score: 15.0
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  33. Silvia Barbantani & R. A. Hazzard (2002). Imagination of a Monarchy: Studies in Ptolemaic Propaganda. Journal of Hellenic Studies 122:183.score: 15.0
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  34. Robert Brentano (1992). Colin Morris, The Papal Monarchy: The Western Church From 1050 to 1250.(Oxford History of the Christian Church.) New York and Oxford: Clarendon Press, Oxford University Press, 1989. Pp. Xvii, 673. $89. [REVIEW] Speculum 67 (4):1014-1016.score: 15.0
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  35. Georg Franz-Willing (1989). The History of Bavaria in the 20th Century. From Monarchy to Federal State. Philosophy and History 22 (1):118-119.score: 15.0
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  36. Klaus-Detlev Grothusen (1986). The Habsburg Monarchy, 1848–1918. Vol. IV. Philosophy and History 19 (1):83-84.score: 15.0
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  37. [deleted]H. Fichtenau & T. Jaeger (1961). The Germanic Monarchy of the Middle Ages and Its Power Over the Church. Diogenes 9 (34):66-81.score: 15.0
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  38. Marion Leathers Kuntz (1983). Guillaume Postel and the World State: Restitution and the Universal Monarchy. History of European Ideas 4 (4):445-465.score: 15.0
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  39. Fergus Millar (1992). The Augustan Monarchy. The Classical Review 42 (02):378-.score: 15.0
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  40. John Morgan (2009). Science, England's' Interest'and Universal Monarchy: The Making of Thomas Sprat's History of the Royal Society. History of Science 47 (1):27-54.score: 15.0
  41. Libora Oates-Indruchová (2013). Neither Woman Nor Jew: The Confluence of Prejudices in the Austro-Hungarian Monarchy at the Turn of the Century. The European Legacy 18 (6):790-791.score: 15.0
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  42. Daniel Ogden (2001). Royal Women E. D. Carney: Women and Monarchy in Macedonia . Pp. Xiv + 369. Norman: University of Oklahoma Press, 2000. Cased, $42.95. ISBN: 0-8061-3212-. [REVIEW] The Classical Review 51 (02):318-.score: 15.0
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  43. Robin Seager (1994). Sulla's Monarchy F. Hurlet: La Dictature de Sylla: Monarchie Ou Magistrature Républicaine? Essaie Ďhistoire Constitutionelle. (Études de Philologie, Ďarchéologie Et Ďhistoire Anciennes, 30.) Pp. 205. Brussels, Rome: Institut Historique Belge de Rome, 1993. Paper, B.Fr. 1100. [REVIEW] The Classical Review 44 (02):347-348.score: 15.0
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  44. Susan Stephens (2008). Hellenistic Egypt: Monarchy, Society, Economy, Culture. Common Knowledge 14 (3):503-504.score: 15.0
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  45. R. N. Swanson (2008). Christianization and the Rise of Christian Monarchy: Scandinavia, Central Europe, and Rus', C. 900-1200. Edited by Nora Berend. [REVIEW] Heythrop Journal 49 (6):1058-1059.score: 15.0
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  46. W. W. Tarn (1935). The Theory of Hellenistic Monarchy Paola Zancan: Il Monarcato Ellenistico Net Suoi Elementi Federativi. Pp. Viii+150. Padua: Milani, 1934. Paper, L. 18. [REVIEW] The Classical Review 49 (05):187-.score: 15.0
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  47. Ulrich Adam (2003). Nobility and Modern Monarchy—J.H.G. Justi and the French Debate on Commercial Nobility at the Beginning of the Seven Years War. [REVIEW] History of European Ideas 29 (2):141-157.score: 15.0
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  48. A. P. D'Entrèves (1955). Dante. Monarchy and Three Political Letters. With an Introduction by Donald Nichoix, and a Note on the Chronology of Dante's Political Works by Colin Hardie. (“Library of Ideas,” Weidenfeld and Nicolson: London, 1954.). [REVIEW] Philosophy 30 (115):373-.score: 15.0
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  49. Angelos Chaniotis (2007). Imagination of a Monarchy: Studies in Ptolemaic Propaganda (Review). Classical World 100 (2):175-176.score: 15.0
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  50. J. A. Crook (1961). Constitutional Development of the Roman Empire Mason Hammond: The Antonine Monarchy. (Papers and Monographs of the American Academy in Rome, Vol. Xix.) Pp. Xi+527. Rome: American Academy, 1959. Paper. [REVIEW] The Classical Review 11 (03):275-276.score: 15.0
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