Search results for 'Monica Kidd' (try it on Scholar)

740 found
Order:
  1.  12
    Sarah N. Cross, Elizabeth Dickhut, Monica Kidd, Katie Antony, Gretchen A. Case, Moira Linehan & Carl Tyler (2012). Birth: A Collection of Poems. [REVIEW] Journal of Medical Humanities 33 (2):127-134.
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  2.  20
    Ian James Kidd & Guy Bennett-Hunter (eds.) (2012). Mystery and Humility. European Journal for Philosophy of Religion.
    This guest-edited special section explores the related themes of mystery, humility, and religious practice from both the Western and East Asian philosophical traditions. The contributors are David E. Cooper, John Cottingham, Mark Wynn, Graham Parkes, and Ian James Kidd.
    Translate
      Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  3.  18
    Ian James Kidd (2015). What’s so Great About Feyerabend? Against Method, Forty Years On. Metascience 24 (3):343-349.
    No categories
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   3 citations  
  4.  13
    Ian James Kidd (2016). Inevitability, Contingency, and Epistemic Humility. Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part A 55:12-19.
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   2 citations  
  5.  41
    Ian James Kidd (2012). Feyerabend, Pseudo-Dionysius, and the Ineffability of Reality. Philosophia 40 (2):365-377.
    This paper explores the influence of the fifth-century Christian Neoplatonist Pseudo-Dionysius the Areopagite (Denys) on the twentieth-century philosopher of science Paul Feyerabend. I argue that the later Feyerabend took from Denys a metaphysical claim—the ‘doctrine of ineffability’—intended to support epistemic pluralism. The paper has five parts. Part one introduces Denys and Feyerabend’s common epistemological concern to deny the possibility of human knowledge of ultimate reality. Part two examines Denys’ arguments for the ‘ineffability’ of God as presented in On the Divine (...)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   6 citations  
  6. Alan Kidd & Terry Wyke (2005). The Cholera Epidemic in Manchester 1831-32. Bulletin of the John Rylands Library 87 (1):43-56.
    No categories
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  7.  24
    Ian James Kidd (forthcoming). Intellectual Humility, Confidence, and Argumentation. Topoi:1-8.
    In this paper, I explore the relationship of virtue, argumentation, and philosophical conduct by considering the role of the specific virtue of intellectual humility in the practice of philosophical argumentation. I have three aims: first, to sketch an account of this virtue; second, to argue that it can be cultivated by engaging in argumentation with others; and third, to problematize this claim by drawing upon recent data from social psychology. My claim is that philosophical argumentation can be conducive to the (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   1 citation  
  8.  8
    Ian James Kidd (2013). A Pluralist Challenge to 'Integrative Medicine': Feyerabend and Popper on the Cognitive Value of Alternative Medicine. Studies in History and Philosophy of Biological and Biomedical Sciences 44 (3):392–400.
    This paper is a critique of ‘integrative medicine’ as an ideal of medical progress on the grounds that it fails to realise the cognitive value of alternative medicine. After a brief account of the cognitive value of alternative medicine, I outline the form of ‘integrative medicine’ defended by the late Stephen Straus, former director of the US National Centre for Complementary and Alternative Medicine. Straus’ account is then considered in the light of Zuzana Parusnikova’s recent criticism of ‘integrative medicine’ and (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   3 citations  
  9.  9
    Ian James Kidd (2013). Feyerabend on Science and Education. Journal of Philosophy of Education 47 (3):407-422.
    This article offers a sympathetic interpretation of Paul Feyerabend's remarks on science and education. I present a formative episode in the development of his educational ideas—the ‘Berkeley experience'—and describe how it affected his views on the place of science within modern education. It emerges that Feyerabend arrived at a conception of education closely related to that of Michael Oakeshott and Martin Heidegger—that of education as ‘releasement’. Each of those three figures argued that the purpose of education was not to induct (...)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   3 citations  
  10.  12
    Ian James Kidd (2011). Pierre Duhem's Epistemic Aims and the Intellectual Virtue of Humility: A Reply to Ivanova. Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part A 42 (1):185-189.
    David Stump has recently argued that Pierre Duhem can be interpreted as a virtue epistemologist. Stump’s claims have been challenged by Milena Ivanova on the grounds that Duhem’s ‘epistemic aims’ are more modest than those of virtue epistemologists. I challenge Ivanova’s criticism of Stump by arguing that she not distinguish between ‘reliabilist’ and ‘responsibilist’ virtue epistemologies. Once this distinction is drawn, Duhem clearly emerges as a ‘virtue-responsibilist’ in a way that complements Ivanova’s positive proposal that Duhem’s ‘good sense’ reflects a (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   5 citations  
  11.  6
    Ian James Kidd (2012). Humane Philosophy and the Question of Progress. Ratio 25 (3):277-290.
    According to some recent critics, philosophy has not progressed over the course of its history because it has not exhibited any substantial increase in the stock of human wisdom. I reject this pessimistic conclusion by arguing that such criticisms employ a conception of progress drawn from the sciences which is inapplicable to a humanistic discipline such as philosophy. Philosophy should not be understood as the accumulation of epistemic goods in a manner analogous to the natural sciences. I argue that the (...)
    Direct download (7 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   4 citations  
  12.  20
    Robin Findlay Hendry & Ian James Kidd (2016). Introduction: Historiography and the Philosophy of the Sciences. Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part A 55:1-2.
    The history of science and the philosophy of science have a long and tangled relationship. On the one hand, philosophical reflection on science can be guided, shaped, and challenged by historical scholarship—a process begun by Thomas Kuhn and continued by successive generations of ‘post-positivist’ historians and philosophers of science. On the other hand, the activity of writing the history of science raises methodological questions concerning, for instance, progress in science, realism and antirealism, and the semantics of scientific theories, questions which (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  13. Ian James Kidd (2015). Doing Science an Injustice: Midgley on Scientism. In Ian James Kidd & Elizabeth McKinnell (eds.), Science and the Self: Animals, Evolution, and Ethics: Essays in Honour of Mary Midgley. Routledge 151-167.
    In this chapter, I offer an account of Midgley‘s critique of scientism that converges on the claim that, among its many faults, scientism is objectionable because it does science an injustice.
    No categories
    Translate
     
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   1 citation  
  14. Chad Kidd (2011). Phenomenal Consciousness with Infallible Self-Representation. Philosophical Studies 152 (3):361-383.
    In this paper, I argue against the claim recently defended by Josh Weisberg that a certain version of the self-representational approach to phenomenal consciousness cannot avoid a set of problems that have plagued higher-order approaches. These problems arise specifically for theories that allow for higher-order misrepresentation or—in the domain of self-representational theories—self-misrepresentation. In response to Weisberg, I articulate a self-representational theory of phenomenal consciousness according to which it is contingently impossible for self-representations tokened in the context of a conscious mental (...)
    Direct download (9 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   3 citations  
  15.  20
    Ian James Kidd (2012). Can Illness Be Edifying? Inquiry 55 (5):496-520.
    Abstract Havi Carel has recently argued that one can be ill and happy. An ill person can ?positively respond? to illness by cultivating ?adaptability? and ?creativity?. I propose that Carel's claim can be augmented by connecting it with virtue ethics. The positive responses which Carel describes are best understood as the cultivation of virtues, and this adds a significant moral aspect to coping with illness. I then defend this claim against two sets of objections and conclude that interpreting Carel's phenomenology (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   3 citations  
  16.  55
    Ian James Kidd (2013). Historical Contingency and the Impact of Scientific Imperialism. International Studies in the Philosophy of Science 27 (3):317–326.
    In a recent article in this journal, Steve Clarke and Adrian Walsh propose a normative basis for John Dupré’s criticisms of scientific imperialism, namely, that scientific imperialism can cause a discipline to fail to progress in ways that it otherwise would have. This proposal is based on two presuppositions: one, that scientific disciplines have developmental teleologies, and two, that these teleologies are optimal. I argue that we should reject both of these presuppositions and so conclude that Clarke and Walsh’s proposal (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   1 citation  
  17. Ian James Kidd (2013). A Pluralist Challenge to “Integrative Medicine”: Feyerabend and Popper on the Cognitive Value of Alternative Medicine. Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part C: Studies in History and Philosophy of Biological and Biomedical Sciences 44 (3):392-400.
    No categories
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   2 citations  
  18.  10
    Ian James Kidd (2011). Objectivity, Abstraction, and the Individual: The Influence of Søren Kierkegaard on Paul Feyerabend. Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part A 42 (1):125-134.
    This paper explores the influence of Søren Kierkegaard upon Paul Feyerabend by examining their common criticisms of totalising accounts of human nature. Both complained that philosophical and scientific theories of human nature which were methodologically committed to objectivity and abstraction failed to capture the richness of human experience. Kierkegaard and Feyerabend argued that philosophy and the science were threatening to become obstacles to human development by imposing abstract theories of human nature and reality which denied the complexities of both. In (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   3 citations  
  19. Ian James Kidd (forthcoming). Epistemic Vices in Public Debate: The Case of New Atheism. In Christopher Cotter & Philip Quadrio (eds.), New Atheism's Legacy: Critical Perspectives From Philosophy and the Social Sciences. Springer
    Although critics often argue that the new atheists are arrogant, dogmatic, closed-minded and so on, there is currently no philosophical analysis of this complaint - which I will call 'the vice charge' - and no assessment of whether it is merely a rhetorical aside or a substantive objection in its own right. This Chapter therefore uses the resources of virtue epistemology to articulate this ' vice charge' and to argue that critics are right to imply that new atheism is intrinsically (...)
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   2 citations  
  20.  26
    Celeste Kidd, Holly Palmeri & Richard N. Aslin (2013). Rational Snacking: Young Children's Decision-Making on the Marshmallow Task is Moderated by Beliefs About Environmental Reliability. Cognition 126 (1):109-114.
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   1 citation  
  21. Ian James Kidd (forthcoming). ‘“What’s So Great About Science?” Feyerabend on the Ideological Use and Abuse of Science. In Elena Aronova & Simone Turchetti (eds.), The Politics of Science Studies.
    It is very well known that from the late-1960s onwards Feyerabend began to radically challenge some deeply-held ideas about the history and methodology of the sciences. It is equally well known that, from around the same period, he also began to radically challenge wider claims about the value and place of the sciences within modern societies, for instance by calling for the separation of science and the state and by questioning the idea that the sciences served to liberate and ameliorate (...)
    Translate
     
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   2 citations  
  22.  18
    Ian James Kidd (2012). Biopiracy and the Ethics of Medical Heritage: The Case of India's Traditional Knowledge Digital Library'. [REVIEW] Journal of Medical Humanities 33 (3):175-183.
    Medical humanities have a unique role to play in combating biopiracy. This argument is offered both as a response to contemporary concerns about the ‘value’ and ‘impact’ of the arts and humanities and as a contribution to ongoing legal, political, and ethical debates regarding the status and protection of medical heritage. Medical humanities can contribute to the documentation and safeguarding of a nation or people’s medical heritage, understood as a form of intangible cultural heritage. In so doing it can fulfill (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   2 citations  
  23.  8
    Ian James Kidd & Havi Carel (2016). Epistemic Injustice and Illness. Journal of Applied Philosophy 32 (4).
    This article analyses the phenomenon of epistemic injustice within contemporary healthcare. We begin by detailing the persistent complaints patients make about their testimonial frustration and hermeneutical marginalization, and the negative impact this has on their care. We offer an epistemic analysis of this problem using Miranda Fricker's account of epistemic injustice. We detail two types of epistemic injustice, testimonial and hermeneutical, and identify the negative stereotypes and structural features of modern healthcare practices that generate them. We claim that these stereotypes (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  24.  3
    Ian James Kidd (2016). Why Did Feyerabend Defend Astrology? Integrity, Virtue, and the Authority of Science. Social Epistemology 30 (4):464-482.
    This paper explores the relationship between epistemic integrity, virtue, and authority by offering a virtue epistemological reading of the defences of non-scientific beliefs, practices, and traditions in the writings of Paul Feyerabend. I argue that there was a robust epistemic rationale for those defences and that it can inform contemporary reflection on the epistemic authority of the sciences. Two common explanations of the purpose of those defences are rejected as lacking textual support. A third “pluralist” reading is judged more persuasive, (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  25.  13
    Ian James Kidd (forthcoming). Beauty, Virtue, and Religious Exemplars. Religious Studies:1-11.
    This paper explores the beauty of religious exemplars Ð those special persons whose conduct and comportment marks their life out as one that exemplifies a religious life. Such exemplars are consistently described as beautiful, but it is not clear how or why. I suggest that we can make sense of the aesthetically aspect of religious exemplarity by adopting a Ôvirtue-centricÕ theory of beauty that understands the beautiful in terms of the expression or manifestation of virtues. Religious exemplars are those who (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  26.  17
    Ian James Kidd (2013). Is Naturalism Bleak? Environmental Values 22 (6):689-702.
    Although Cottingham and Holland make a persuasive case for the claim that it is difficult to situate a meaningful life within a Darwinian naturalistic cosmology, this paper argues that their case should be modified in response to the apparent fact that certain persons seem genuinely not to experience the ‘bleakness’ that they describe. Although certain of these cases will reflect an incomplete appreciation of the existential implications of Darwinian naturalism, at least some of those cases may be genuine. The resulting (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   1 citation  
  27. Colin Kidd (2014). The Phillipsonian Enlightenment. Modern Intellectual History 11 (1):175-190.
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   1 citation  
  28. Ian James Kidd (forthcoming). Feyerabend on Politics, Education, and Scientific Culture. Studies in History and Philosophy of Science.
    The purpose of this paper is to offer a sympathetic reconstruction of the political thought of Paul Feyerabend. Using a critical discussion of the idea of the ‘free society’ it is suggested that his political thought is best understood in terms of three thematic concerns – liberation, hegemony, and the authority of science – and that the political significance of those claims become clear when they are considered in the context of his educational views. It emerges that Feyerabend is best (...)
    Translate
     
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   1 citation  
  29.  39
    Chad Kidd (2015). The Idols of Inner-Sense. Philosophical Studies 172 (7):1759-1782.
    Many philosophers hold one of two extreme views about our capacity to have phenomenally conscious experience : either that inner-sense enables us to know our experience and its properties infallibly or the contrary conviction that inner-sense is utterly fallible and the evidence it provides completely defeasible. Both of these are in error. This paper presents an alternative conception of inner-sense, modeled on disjunctive conceptions of perceptual awareness, that avoids both erroneous extremes, but that builds on the commonsense intuitions that motivate (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  30.  4
    Ian James Kidd (2013). A Phenomenological Challenge to 'Enlightened Secularism'. Religious Studies 49 (3):377-398.
    This article challenges Philip Kitcher’s recent proposals for an ‘enlightened secularism’. I use William James’s theory of the emotions and his related discussion of ‘temperaments’ to argue that religious and naturalistic commitments are grounded in tacit, inarticulate ways that one finds oneself in a world. This indicates that, in many cases, religiosity and naturalism are grounded not in rational and evidential considerations, but in a tacit and implicit sense of reality which is disclosed through phenomenological enquiry. Once the foundational role (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   1 citation  
  31.  81
    Charles V. Kidd (1992). The Evolution of Sustainability. Journal of Agricultural and Environmental Ethics 5 (1):1-26.
    Six separate but related strains of thought have emerged prominently since 1950 in discussions of such phenomena as the interrelationships among rates of population growth, resource use, and pressure on the environment. They are the ecological/carrying capacity root, the resources/environment root, the biosphere root, the critique of technology root, the no growth/slow growth root, and the ecodevelopment root.Each of these strains of thought was fully developed before the word sustainable itself was used. Many of the roots are based on fundamentally (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   3 citations  
  32.  5
    Matthew J. Brown & Ian James Kidd (forthcoming). Introduction: Reappraising Paul Feyerabend. Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part A.
    This volume is devoted to a reappraisal of the philosophy of Paul Feyerabend. It has four aims. The first is to reassess his already well-known work from the 1960s and 1970s in light of contemporary developments in the history and philosophy of science. The second is to explore themes in his neglected later work, including recently published and previously unavailable writings. The third is to assess the contributions that Feyerabend can make to contemporary debate, on topics such as perspectivism, realism, (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  33.  5
    Ian James Kidd (forthcoming). Why Did Feyerabend Defend Astrology? Integrity, Virtue, and the Authority of Science. Social Epistemology:1-19.
    This paper explores the relationship between epistemic integrity, virtue, and authority by offering a virtue epistemological reading of the defences of non-scientific beliefs, practices, and traditions in the writings of Paul Feyerabend. I argue that there was arobust epistemic rationale for those defences and that it can inform contemporaryreflection on the epistemic authority of the sciences. Two common explanations of the purpose of those defences are rejected as lacking textual support. A third "pluralist" reading is judged more persuasive, but found (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  34. Deborah C. Saltman, Natalie A. O'Dea, Jane Farmer, Craig Veitch, Gaye Rosen & Michael R. Kidd (2007). Groups or Teams in Health Care: Finding the Best Fit. Journal of Evaluation in Clinical Practice 13 (1):55-60.
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   2 citations  
  35.  1
    Ian James Kidd (2011). The Contingency of Science and the Future of Philosophy. In Eric Dietrich & Zach Weber (eds.), Essays in Philosophy. 312--328.
    Contemporary metaphilosophical debates on the future of philosophy invariably include references to the natural sciences. This is wholly understandable given the cognitive and cultural authority of the sciences and their contributions to philosophical thought and practice. However such appeals to the sciences should be moderated by reflections on contingency of sciences. Using the work of contemporary historians and philosophers of science, I argue that an awareness of the radical contingency of science supports the claim that philosophy’s future should not be (...)
    No categories
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   1 citation  
  36.  1
    S. Douglas Olson & D. Kidd (1999). Aratus, Phaenomena. Journal of Hellenic Studies 119:187.
    Translate
      Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   3 citations  
  37. Ian James Kidd (forthcoming). Phenomenology, Naturalism, and Religious Experience. In Alasdair Coles & Fraser Watts (eds.), Religion and Neurology. Cambridge University Press
    Contemporary philosophical debates about the competing merits of neurological and phenomenological approaches to understanding both psychiatric illness and religious experience—and, indeed, the relationship, if any, between psychiatric illness and religious experience. In this chapter, I propose that both psychiatric illness and religious experiences - at least in some of their diverse forms - are best understood phenomenologically in terms of radical changes in a person's 'existential feelings', in the sense articulated by Matthew Ratcliffe. If so, explanatory priority should be assigned (...)
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  38.  3
    M. G. Kidd & J. T. H. Connor (2008). Striving to Do Good Things: Teaching Humanities in Canadian Medical Schools. [REVIEW] Journal of Medical Humanities 29 (1):45-54.
    We provide the results of a systematic key-informant review of medical humanities curricula at fourteen of Canada’s seventeen medical schools. This survey was the first of its kind. We found a wide diversity of views among medical educators as to what constitutes the medical humanities, and a lack of consensus on how best to train medical students in the field. In fact, it is not clear that consensus has been attempted – or is even desirable – given that Canadian medical (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   1 citation  
  39. Ian James Kidd (forthcoming). Charging Others With Epistemic Vice. The Monist.
    This paper offers an analysis of the structure of epistemic vice-charging, the critical practice of charging other persons with epistemic vice. Several desiderata for a robust vice-charge are offered and two deep obstacles to the practice of epistemic vice-charging are then identified and discussed. The problem of responsibility is that few of us enjoy conditions that are required for effective socialisation as responsible epistemic agents. The problem of consensus is that the efficacy of a vice-charge is contingent upon a degree (...)
    Translate
     
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  40. Ian James Kidd (forthcoming). Educating for Intellectual Humility. In Jason Baehr (ed.), Educating for Intellectual Virtues: Applying Virtue Epistemology to Educational Theory and Practice. Routledge
    My purpose in this chapter is to contribute to the revival of aretaic conceptions of education, but in a way sensitive to those sceptics’ concerns. Specifically, I offer an account of the specific virtue of intellectual humility, then show its integral role in a range of familiar educational practices and concerns, and finally describe how certain entrenched educational attitudes and conceptions marginalise or militate against the cultivation and exercise of this virtue. The chapter ends by suggesting that educational attitudes, practices, (...)
    Translate
     
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  41. Ian James Kidd (forthcoming). Epistemic Injustice and Religion. In Ian James Kidd, José Medina & Gaile Pohlhaus (eds.), The Routledge Handbook to Epistemic Injustice. Routledge
    I consider several ways in which religious persons, communities, and traditions may be sources and subjects of epistemic injustice.
    Translate
     
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  42. Ian James Kidd & Havi Carel (forthcoming). Epistemic Injustice in Medicine and Healthcare. In Ian James Kidd, José Medina & Gaile Pohlhaus (eds.), The Routledge Handbook to Epistemic Injustice. Routledge
    We survey several ways in which the structures and norms of medicine and healthcare can generate epistemic injustice.
    Translate
     
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  43. Ian James Kidd & Matthew Brown (forthcoming). Reappraising Feyerabend. Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part A.
    This volume is devoted to a reappraisal of the philosophy of Paul Feyerabend. It has four aims. The first is to reassess his already well-known work from the 1960s and 1970s in light of contemporary developments in the history and philosophy of science. The second is to explore themes in his neglected later work, including recently published and previously unavailable writings. The third is to assess the contributions that Feyerabend can make to contemporary debate, on topics such as perspectivism, realism, (...)
    Translate
     
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  44.  1
    Ian James Kidd & Havi Carel (2016). Epistemic Injustice and Illness. Journal of Applied Philosophy 33 (2).
    This article analyses the phenomenon of epistemic injustice within contemporary healthcare. We begin by detailing the persistent complaints patients make about their testimonial frustration and hermeneutical marginalization, and the negative impact this has on their care. We offer an epistemic analysis of this problem using Miranda Fricker's account of epistemic injustice. We detail two types of epistemic injustice, testimonial and hermeneutical, and identify the negative stereotypes and structural features of modern healthcare practices that generate them. We claim that these stereotypes (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  45.  15
    Ian James Kidd (2014). Humility and History. Think 13 (38):59-68.
    I argue that amongst its many benefits, the history of philosophy is an excellent resource for the cultivation of certain intellectual virtues, most notably gratitude, humility, and justice. Acquaintance with the history of philosophy can, therefore, be edifying, in the sense of being conducive to the cultivation and exercise of virtues. These virtues can be cultivated in many ways, but the history of philosophy offers unique means for securing them, and some familiar pedagogical and intellectual uses of the history of (...)
    No categories
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  46. Ian Gray Kidd (1971). Posidonius on Emotions. In A. A. Long (ed.), Problems in Stoicism. Athlone Press
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   2 citations  
  47. I. G. Kidd (1971). Stoic Intermediates and the End for Man. In A. A. Long (ed.), Problems in Stoicism. Athlone Press 150--72.
    No categories
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   2 citations  
  48.  16
    Ian James Kidd (2011). Three Cheers for Science and Philosophy! Think 10 (29):37-41.
    Stephen Hawking recently caused controversy by suggesting that philosophy had become obsolete in the face of the advance of modern science. Hawking's The Grand Design is only the latest in a long series of premature notifications of the obsolescence of philosophy. A wide range of writers, including but not limited to scientists and philosophers, have suggested that philosophy, in part or in whole, has been superseded by the sciences in a way that, all things considered, justifies its abandonment. Some forty (...)
    No categories
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  49. Ludwig Edelstein & I. G. Kidd (1972). Posidonius I. Cambridge University Press.
    No categories
    Translate
     
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   3 citations  
  50.  2
    Stephen E. Kidd (2016). Epitasis_ and _Anesis_ in Aristotle, _De Caelo 2.6. Phronesis 61 (1):33-42.
    _ Source: _Volume 61, Issue 1, pp 33 - 42 _De caelo_ 2.6 describes irregular motion differently from the discussion at _Physics_ 5.4. The desire to make the one discussion congrue with the other has strained interpretation of the _De caelo_ passage. Aristotle provides a theory of irregular motion that is tripartite and the passage ought to be interpreted in such a way as to explain this tripartite motion. _Akmē_ is not a ‘top speed’ as it is generally translated, but (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
1 — 50 / 740