Search results for 'Monism History' (try it on Scholar)

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  1. Todd H. Weir (ed.) (2012). Monism: Science, Philosophy, Religion, and the History of a Worldview. Palgrave Macmillan.score: 120.0
     
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  2. Georgiĭ Valentinovich Plekhanov (1972). The Development of the Monist View of History. Moscow,Progress Publishers.score: 84.0
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  3. Ganeswar Misra (1986). Sources of Monism: Bradley and Śaṅkara. Anu Books.score: 78.0
  4. Christopher D. Horvath (1997). Discussion: Phylogenetic Species Concept: Pluralism, Monism, and History. [REVIEW] Biology and Philosophy 12 (2):225-232.score: 72.0
    Species serve as both the basic units of macroevolutionary studies and as the basic units of taxonomic classification. In this paper I argue that the taxa identified as species by the Phylogenetic Species Concept (Mishler and Brandon 1987) are the units of biological organization most causally relevant to the evolutionary process but that such units exist at multiple levels within the hierarchy of any phylogenetic lineage. The PSC gives us no way of identifying one of these levels as the privileged (...)
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  5. Paul Guyer (2013). Monism and Pluralism in the History of Aesthetics. Journal of Aesthetics and Art Criticism 71 (2):133-143.score: 72.0
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  6. Steindór J. Erlingsson (2002). From Haeckelian Monist to Anti-Haeckelian Vitalist: The Transformation of the Icelandic Naturalist Thorvaldur Thoroddsen (1855-1921). [REVIEW] Journal of the History of Biology 35 (3):443 - 470.score: 60.0
    Iceland has not been known as a contributor to the history of science. This small nation in the North-Atlantic has only in recent decades made its mark on international science. But the Icelandic naturalist Thorvaldur Thoroddsen (1855-1921) is an exception to this generalisation, for he was well known at the turn of the 20th century in Europe and America for his research on the geography and geology of Iceland. Though Thoroddsen's contribution to these sciences is of great interest there (...)
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  7. Klaus Müller (2006). Streit Um Gott: Politik, Poetik Und Philosophie Im Ringen Um Das Wahre Gottesbild. Verlag F. Pustet.score: 60.0
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  8. I. Grattan-Guinness (2011). Omnipresence, Multipresence and Ubiquity: Kinds of Generality in and Around Mathematics and Logics. [REVIEW] Logica Universalis 5 (1):21-73.score: 54.0
    A prized property of theories of all kinds is that of generality, of applicability or least relevance to a wide range of circumstances and situations. The purpose of this article is to present a pair of distinctions that suggest that three kinds of generality are to be found in mathematics and logics, not only at some particular period but especially in developments that take place over time: ‘omnipresent’ and ‘multipresent’ theories, and ‘ubiquitous’ notions that form dependent parts, or moments, of (...)
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  9. Heiner Fangerau (2012). Monism, Racial Hygiene, and National Socialism. In Todd H. Weir (ed.), Monism: Science, Philosophy, Religion, and the History of a Worldview. Palgrave Macmillan.score: 54.0
     
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  10. Norbert M. Samuelson (2011). Reflections on the Distinctness of Judaism and the Sciences. Zygon 46 (2):396-412.score: 48.0
    Abstract. The object of this essay is to explain what there is about discussions of Judaism and the sciences that is distinctive from discussions about religion in general and the sciences. The description draws primarily but not exclusively from recent meetings of the Judaism, Medicine, and Science Group in Tempe, Arizona. The author's Jewish Faith and Modern Science, together with a selective bibliography of writings in this subfield, are used to generate a list of science issues—focused around the religious doctrines (...)
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  11. Thomas Möllenbeck (ed.) (2009). Geist - Natur: Schöpfung Zwischen Monismus Und Dualismus. Aschendorff.score: 48.0
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  12. Peter J. Bowler (2012). Monism in Britain : Biologists and the Rationalist Press Association. In Todd H. Weir (ed.), Monism: Science, Philosophy, Religion, and the History of a Worldview. Palgrave Macmillan.score: 42.0
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  13. Sander Gliboff (2012). Monism and Morphology at the Turn of the Twentieth Century. In Todd H. Weir (ed.), Monism: Science, Philosophy, Religion, and the History of a Worldview. Palgrave Macmillan.score: 42.0
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  14. Frederick Gregory (2012). Proto-Monism in German Philosophy, Theology, and Science, 1800 to 1845. In Todd H. Weir (ed.), Monism: Science, Philosophy, Religion, and the History of a Worldview. Palgrave Macmillan.score: 42.0
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  15. Tracie Matysik (2012). Spinozist Monism : Perspectives From Within and Without the Monist Movement. In Todd H. Weir (ed.), Monism: Science, Philosophy, Religion, and the History of a Worldview. Palgrave Macmillan.score: 42.0
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  16. Cian O'Driscoll (2009). Hedgehog or Fox? An Essay on James Turner Johnson's View of History. Journal of Military Ethics 8 (3):165-178.score: 42.0
    Drawing on Isaiah Berlin's celebrated essay on Tolstoy, this paper poses the question should James Turner Johnson be deemed a hedgehog or a fox? That is, it considers whether Johnson should be regarded as a monist (hedgehog) or a pluralist (fox) in his contribution to the just war tradition. It contends that his commitment to history, while superficially indicative of a hedgehog, serves to conceal a deep-lying pluralism ? or at least the possibility of such ? in his views (...)
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  17. Nicolaas Rupke (2012). Alexander von Humboldt and Monism. In Todd H. Weir (ed.), Monism: Science, Philosophy, Religion, and the History of a Worldview. Palgrave Macmillan.score: 42.0
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  18. Todd H. Weir (2012). The Riddles of Monism: An Introductory Essay. In , Monism: Science, Philosophy, Religion, and the History of a Worldview. Palgrave Macmillan.score: 42.0
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  19. Paul Ziche (2012). Monist Philosophy of Science : Between Worldview and Scientific Meta-Reflection. In Todd H. Weir (ed.), Monism: Science, Philosophy, Religion, and the History of a Worldview. Palgrave Macmillan.score: 42.0
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  20. Joanne A. Wood (1994). Lighthouse Bodies: The Neutral Monism of Virginia Woolf and Bertrand Russell. Journal of the History of Ideas 55 (3):483-502.score: 36.0
  21. Maria Das Graças de Souza (2012). Materialismo e história: o caso do Barão d'Holbach. Doispontos 8 (1).score: 36.0
    We aim, in the first place, to examine at what extent Holbach´s materialistic monism, as presented in his System of nature (1770), allows us to formulate an original conception of history, so that we can, secondly, ascertain whether this conception of the general course of human events could be identified in his Natural history of superstition.
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  22. Maria das Graças de Souza (2011). Materialismo e história: o caso do Barão d'Holbach. Doispontos 8 (1).score: 36.0
    We aim, in the first place, to examine at what extent Holbach´s materialistic monism, as presented in his System of nature (1770), allows us to formulate an original conception of history, so that we can, secondly, ascertain whether this conception of the general course of human events could be identified in his Natural history of superstition.
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  23. Reinbert A. Krol (2010). Friedrich Meinecke: Panentheism and the Crisis of Historicism. Journal of the Philosophy of History 4 (2):195-209.score: 30.0
    Friedrich Meinecke's Die Idee der Staatsräson (1924) is generally seen as the study in which he replaced his monistic-idealistic philosophy of history - as articulated in Weltbürgertum und Nationalstaat - by a dualistic worldview. In this article I will argue against this view. I will do so on the basis of a brief analysis of Meinecke's Staatsräson -study. I will show that Meinecke succeeded in combining his monism and his dualism within a so-called (harmonious) 'panentheistic' philosophy. Next, when (...)
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  24. Igor J. Polianski (2012). Between Hegel and Haeckel : Monistic Worldview, Marxist Philosophy and Biomedicine in Russia and the Soviet Union. In Todd H. Weir (ed.), Monism: Science, Philosophy, Religion, and the History of a Worldview. Palgrave Macmillan.score: 30.0
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  25. James Thompson (2012). Democracy, Monism and the Common Good: Rethinking William Clarke's Political Religion. History of European Ideas 38 (2):233-247.score: 30.0
    Summary This article re-examines the political thought of the neglected Fabian essayist and radical journalist William Clarke. Historians have differed over the relative importance of socialism and liberalism in Clarke's political thought. The argument is made here that the key to Clarke's thought lies in his moralised conception of democracy, rooted in his monist ontology. The further deepening of democracy was threatened for Clarke by developments in monopolistic capitalism and the related emergence of a new imperialism. Clarke's understanding of democracy, (...)
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  26. W. E. Cooper (1990). William James's Theory of Mind. Journal of the History of Philosophy (October) 571 (October):571-593.score: 24.0
    Neutral monist, panpsychist, naturalist, and phenomenological interpretations of James's theory of mind are canvassed. Culling the true tenets from each, I make a case for a reconciling view on the basis of a distinction between mental and proto-mental properties. The resulting interpretation is compared to two forms of panpsychism identified by T Nagel in his essay of that name.
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  27. Paul Raymont (1999). An Idle Threat: Epiphenomenalism Exposed. Dissertation, University of Torontoscore: 24.0
    In this doctoral dissertation I consider, and reject, the claim that recent varieties of non-reductive physicalism, particularly Donald Davidson's anomalous monism, are committed to a new kind of epiphenomenalism. Non-reductive physicalists identify each mental event with a physical event, and are thus entitled to the belief that mental events are causes, since the physical events with which they are held to be identical are causes. However, Jaegwon Kim, Ernest Sosa and others have argued that if we follow the non-reductive (...)
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  28. Bence Nanay (2010). Rational Reconstruction Reconsidered. The Monist 93 (4):598-617.score: 24.0
    Here is a dilemma concerning the history of science. Can the history of scientific thought be reduced to the history of the beliefs, motives and actions of scientists? Or should we think of the history of scientific thought as in some sense independent from the history of scientists? The aim of this paper is to carve out an intermediate position between these two. I will argue that the history of scientific thought supervenes on, but (...)
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  29. Howard M. Robinson (2002). Dualism. In Stephen P. Stich & Ted A. Warfield (eds.), Blackwell Guide to Philosophy of Mind. Blackwell. 85--101.score: 24.0
    This entry concerns dualism in the philosophy of mind. The term ‘dualism’ has a variety of uses in the history of thought. In general, the idea is that, for some particular domain, there are two fundamental kinds or categories of things or principles. In theology, for example a ‘dualist’ is someone who believes that Good and Evil — or God and the Devil — are independent and more or less equal forces in the world. Dualism contrasts with monism, (...)
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  30. Michael Friedman (2010). A Post-Kuhnian Approach to the History and Philosophy of Science. The Monist 93 (4):497-517.score: 24.0
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  31. Yitzhak Y. Melamed (2010). Acosmism or Weak Individuals?: Hegel, Spinoza, and the Reality of the Finite. Journal of the History of Philosophy 48 (1):pp. 77-92.score: 24.0
    Like many of his contemporaries, Hegel considered Spinoza a modern reviver of ancient Eleatic monism, in whose system “all determinate content is swallowed up as radically null and void”. This characterization of Spinoza as denying the reality of the world of finite things had a lasting influence on the perception of Spinoza in the two centuries that followed. In this article, I take these claims of Hegel to task and evaluate their validity. Although Hegel’s official argument for the unreality (...)
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  32. Andrew J. Nicholson (2010). Unifying Hinduism: Philosophy and Identity in Indian Intellectual History. Columbia University Press.score: 24.0
    Some postcolonial theorists argue that the idea of a single system of belief known as "Hinduism" is a creation of nineteenth-century British imperialists. Andrew J. Nicholson introduces another perspective: although a unified Hindu identity is not as ancient as some Hindus claim, it has its roots in innovations within South Asian philosophy from the fourteenth to seventeenth centuries. During this time, thinkers treated the philosophies of Vedanta, Samkhya, and Yoga, along with the worshippers of Visnu, Siva, and Sakti, as belonging (...)
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  33. Howard Robinson, Dualism. Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy.score: 24.0
    This entry concerns dualism in the philosophy of mind. The term ‘dualism’ has a variety of uses in the history of thought. In general, the idea is that, for some particular domain, there are two fundamental kinds or categories of things or principles. In theology, for example a ‘dualist’ is someone who believes that Good and Evil — or God and the Devil — are independent and more or less equal forces in the world. Dualism contrasts with monism, (...)
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  34. Benjamin Vilhauer (2004). Can We Interpret Kant as a Compatibilist About Determinism and Moral Responsibility? British Journal for the History of Philosophy 12 (4):719 – 730.score: 24.0
    In this paper, I discuss Hud Hudson's compatibilistic interpretation of Kant's theory of free will, which is based on Davidson's anomalous monism. I sketch an alternative interpretation of my own, an incompatibilistic interpretation according to which agents qua noumena are responsible for the particular causal laws which determine the actions of agents qua phenomena. Hudson's interpretation should be attractive to philosophers who value Kant's epistemology and ethics, but insist on a deflationary reading of things in themselves. It is in (...)
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  35. Martial Gueroult (1969). The History of Philosophy as a Philosophical Problem. The Monist 53 (4):563-587.score: 24.0
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  36. D. W. Hamlyn (1984). Metaphysics. Cambridge University Press.score: 24.0
    This book provides an introduction to metaphysics. At the outset Professor Hamlyn distinguishes two conceptions of metaphysics running through the history of the subject. One, which goes back to Aristotle, is concerned with ontology, and with what has to exist for beings such as we are; the other separates appearance and reality and attempts to establish what really exists. Professor Hamlyn's account of metaphysics conforms with the first tradition. This is not, however, primarily a historical exposition. The discussion concentrates (...)
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  37. Mario C. Mapote (2013). Christ, the Perfection of Man: A Philosophical-Christological Approach on Christian Anthropology. Iamure International Journal of Literature, Philosophy and Religion 3 (1).score: 24.0
    The study began with an introduction to Philosophy of Man. This Philosophical-Christological approach started with sense of self-awareness on this seemingly vain technological modern world. In the history of philosophy, there were three objects of study evolving by themselves, world, man and God in orderly fashion and repeating in interval phases. Self-experience shows three objects: first, existential unity (past), second, experiential unity (present) and third, transcendental unity (future). Western Philosophy banked on Aristotle’s notion of man as rational animal that (...)
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  38. Karsten Stueber, Agency and the Objectivity of Historical Narratives.score: 24.0
    Judging from the contemporary debate in the philosophy of history, philosophers seem to think of history as an important but also as a very peculiar discipline. They cannot make up their minds on how exactly to describe the epistemic status of historical knowledge or how exactly to situate history among human activities ranging from the arts to the natural sciences.1 The difficulty of philosophically accounting for the character of history goes back to the very beginning of (...)
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  39. Karsten Stueber, Intentional Explanation, Psychological Laws, and the Irreducibility of the First Person Perspective.score: 24.0
    1. Introduction: Naturalism and Psychological Explanations To a large extent, contemporary philosophical debate takes place within a framework of naturalistic assumptions. From the perspective of the history of philosophy, naturalism is the legacy of positivism without its empiricist epistemology and empiricist conception of meaning and cognitive significance. Systematically, it is best to characterize naturalism as the philosophical articulation of the underlying presuppositions of a reductive scientific research program that was rather successful in the last few centuries and, equally important, (...)
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  40. Harald Walach (2007). Mind -- Body -- Spirituality. Mind and Matter 5 (2):215-240.score: 24.0
    The argument of this paper is that the modern brain-consciousness debate has left out one important element: the question of a transpersonal or spirit-like element of consciousness. Thus the problem really is not a mind-body-problem or brain-consciousness problem, but a mind-body-spirit or brain-consciousness-soul problem. Looking at the history of the debate it can be seen that, explicitly or implicitly, this aspect has always been part of the philosophical debate. Most notably, this can be seen in the Aristotelian concept of (...)
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  41. Jonathan Beever & Vernon Cisney (2013). All Things in Mind: Panpsychist Elements in Spinoza, Deleuze, and Peirce. [REVIEW] Biosemiotics 6 (3):351-365.score: 24.0
    Benedict de Spinoza, C.S. Peirce, and Gilles Deleuze delineate a trajectory through the history of ideas in the dialogue about the potentials and limitations of panpsychism, the view that world is fundamentally made up of mind. As a parallel trajectory to the panpsychism debate in contemporary philosophy of mind and cognitive psychology, this approach can inform and enrich the discussion of the role and scope of mind in the natural world. The philosophies of mind developed by Deleuze and Peirce (...)
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  42. Donato Bergandi (ed.) (2013). The Structural Links Between Ecology, Evolution and Ethics: The Virtuous Epistemic Circle. Springer.score: 24.0
    Abstract - Evolutionary, ecological and ethical studies are, at the same time, specific scientific disciplines and, from an historical point of view, structurally linked domains of research. In a context of environmental crisis, the need is increasingly emerging for a connecting epistemological framework able to express a common or convergent tendency of thought and practice aimed at building, among other things, an environmental policy management respectful of the planet’s biodiversity and its evolutionary potential. -/- Evolutionary biology, ecology and ethics: at (...)
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  43. Mark A. Kulstad (1996). Spinoza's Demonstration of Monism: A New Line of Defense. History of Philosophy Quarterly 13 (3):299 - 316.score: 24.0
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  44. Eric Schliesser (2011). Newton's Substance Monism, Distant Action, and the Nature of Newton's Empiricism: Discussion of H. Kochiras “Gravity and Newton's Substance Counting Problem”. Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part A 42 (1):160-166.score: 24.0
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  45. E. van Ree (2000). Stalin as a Marxist Philosopher. Studies in East European Thought 52 (4):259-308.score: 24.0
    This article treats Stalin's contributions todialectical and historical materialism. It argues that the latterfound his theses of the `enormous' role of ideas, and of theexistence of social phenomena that do not belong either to thebasis or to the superstructure, in Georgij Plekhanov's `monism'.Nevertheless, Stalin did add some new points of his own.Furthermore, his adopting Plekhanov's monism also helps usunderstand the apparent contradiction between Stalin's emphasison non-economic and non-class factors in human history and hisrejection of `idealist' rudiments in (...)
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  46. Noël Carroll (1990). Interpretation, History and Narrative. The Monist 73 (2):134-166.score: 24.0
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  47. Thomas R. Flynn (1991). Foucault and the Spaces of History. The Monist 74 (2):165-186.score: 24.0
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  48. Brook Ziporyn (2012). Spinoza and the Self-Overcoming of Solipsism. Comparative and Continental Philosophy 4 (1):125 - 140.score: 24.0
    Spinoza, as a monist and a rationalist, seems unlikely to have occasion to confront any form of the solipsism problem. However, a close examination of his epistemology reveals that he does in fact confront a very radical form of this problem, and offers an equally radical solution to it, derived from the very epistemological premises that make it a potential problem for him. In particular, we find that the conception of the mind as the “idea of the body,” premised on (...)
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  49. André Berten (2013). The Naturalism of Jürgen Habermas and Philip Pettit. Trans/Form/Ação 36 (SPE):45-66.score: 24.0
    As competências cognitivas pressupostas pelas atualizações sociais (relações, discursos, interpretações) significam a atribuição aos seres humanos de uma certa racionalidade. Essa racionalidade pode ser concebida seja na perspectiva de uma filosofia da história de tipo evolucionista (Habermas), seja numa perspectiva da filosofia da mente (Pettit). Nas duas perspectivas, o tipo de questionamento é quase transcendental, no sentido de que se trata de revelar as condições de possibilidade das operações cognitivas reais efetuadas pelos agentes. Em última instância, as condições de possibilidade (...)
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  50. William J. Gavin (1984). The 'Will to Believe' in Science and Religion. International Journal for Philosophy of Religion 15 (3):139 - 148.score: 24.0
    “The Will to Believe” defines the religious question as forced, living and momentous, but even in this article James asserts that more objective factors are involved. The competing religious hypotheses must both be equally coherent and correspond to experimental data to an equal degree. Otherwise the option is not a live one. “If I say to you ‘Be a theosophist or be a Mohammedan’, it is probably a dead option, because for you neither hypothesis is likely to be alive.” James, (...)
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