Search results for 'Monkeys' (try it on Scholar)

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  1. Sean Allen-Hermanson (2010). Blindsight in Monkeys: Lost and (Perhaps) Found. Journal of Consciousness Studies 17 (1-2): 47-71.
    Stoerig and Cowey’s work is widely regarded as showing that monkeys with lesions in the primary visual cortex have blindsight. However, Mole and Kelly persuasively argue that the experimental results are compatible with an alternative hypothesis positing only a deficit in attention and perceptual working memory. I describe a revised procedure which can distinguish these hypotheses, and offer reasons for thinking that the blindsight hypothesis provides a superior explanation. The study of blindsight might contribute towards a general investigation into (...)
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  2. Christopher Mole & Sean D. Kelly (2006). On the Demonstration of Blindsight in Monkeys. Mind and Language 21 (4):475-483.
    The work of Alan Cowey and Petra Stoerig is often taken to have shown that, following lesions analogous to those that cause blindsight in humans, there is blindsight in monkeys. The present paper reveals a problem in Cowey and Stoerig's case for blindsight in monkeys. The problem is that Cowey and Stoerig's results would only provide good evidence for blindsight if there is no difference between their two experimental paradigms with regard to the sorts of stimuli that are (...)
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  3.  5
    Dorothy L. Cheney & Robert M. Seyfarth (1992). Précis of How Monkeys See the World. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 15 (1):135-147.
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  4.  4
    Dorothy M. Fragaszy (2011). Community Resources for Learning: How Capuchin Monkeys Construct Technical Traditions. Biological Theory 6 (3):231-240.
  5.  4
    Mildred Mason & Martha Wilson (1974). Temporal Differentiation and Recognition Memory for Visual Stimuli in Rhesus Monkeys. Journal of Experimental Psychology 103 (3):383.
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  6.  2
    R. W. Worsham & M. R. D'Amato (1973). Ambient Light, White Noise, and Monkey Vocalization as Sources of Interference in Visual Short-Term Memory of Monkeys. Journal of Experimental Psychology 99 (1):99-105.
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  7.  5
    Harry F. Harlow (1950). Analysis of Discrimination Learning by Monkeys. Journal of Experimental Psychology 40 (1):26.
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  8.  6
    H. F. Harlow & T. Johnson (1943). Problem Solution by Monkeys Following Bilateral Removal of of the Prefrontal Areas: III. Test of Initiation of Behavior. Journal of Experimental Psychology 32 (6):495.
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  9.  3
    H. F. Harlow & J. Dagnon (1943). Problem Solution by Monkeys Following Bilateral Removal of the Prefrontal Areas. I. The Discrimination and Discrimination-Reversal Problems. [REVIEW] Journal of Experimental Psychology 32 (4):351.
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  10.  3
    R. J. Campbell & H. F. Harlow (1945). Problem Solution by Monkeys Following Bilateral Removal of the Prefrontal Areas. V. Spatial Delayed Reactions. Journal of Experimental Psychology 35 (2):110.
  11.  3
    T. Spaet & H. F. Harlow (1943). Problem Solution by Monkeys Following Bilateral Removal of the Prefrontal Areas. II. Delayed Reaction Problems Involving Use of the Matching-From-Sample Method. [REVIEW] Journal of Experimental Psychology 32 (5):424.
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  12.  3
    Donald R. Meyer (1951). The Effects of Differential Rewards on Discrimination Reversal Learning by Monkeys. Journal of Experimental Psychology 41 (4):268.
  13.  2
    William A. Wilson Jr (1960). Supplementary Report: Two-Choice Behavior of Monkeys. Journal of Experimental Psychology 59 (3):207.
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  14.  2
    Allan J. Nash & Kenneth M. Michels (1966). Squirrel Monkeys and Discrimination Learning: Figural Interactions, Redundancies, and Random Shapes. Journal of Experimental Psychology 72 (1):132.
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  15.  2
    Donald R. Meyer (1951). Food Deprivation and Discrimination Reversal Learning by Monkeys. Journal of Experimental Psychology 41 (1):10.
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  16.  2
    William A. Wilson Jr & A. Robert Rollin (1959). Two-Choice Behavior of Rhesus Monkeys in a Noncontingent Situation. Journal of Experimental Psychology 58 (2):174.
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  17.  2
    J. M. Warren (1960). Supplementary Report: Effectiveness of Food and Nonfood Signs in Reversal Learning by Monkeys. Journal of Experimental Psychology 60 (4):263-264.
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  18.  2
    Paul Settlage, Myra Zable & Harry F. Harlow (1948). Problem Solution by Monkeys Following Bilateral Removal of the Prefrontal Areas: VI. Performance on Tests Requiring Contradictory Reactions to Similar and to Identical Stimuli. Journal of Experimental Psychology 38 (1):50.
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  19.  1
    H. F. Harlow & T. Spaet (1943). Problem Solution by Monkeys Following Bilateral Removal of the Prefrontal Areas. IV. Responses to Stimuli Having Multiple Sign Values. [REVIEW] Journal of Experimental Psychology 33 (6):500.
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  20.  1
    R. W. Leary (1958). The Temporal Factor in Reward and Nonreward of Monkeys. Journal of Experimental Psychology 56 (3):294.
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  21. Tirin Moore, Hillary R. Rodman & Charles G. Gross (2001). Recovery of Visual Function Following Damage to the Striate Cortex in Monkeys. In Beatrice De Gelder, Edward H. F. De Haan & Charles A. Heywood (eds.), Out of Mind: Varieties of Unconscious Processes. Oxford University Press 35-51.
     
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  22. R. W. Byrne & Andrew Whiten (1988). Machiavellian Intelligence: Social Expertise and the Evolution of Intellect in Monkeys, Apes, and Humans. Oxford University Press.
    This book presents an alternative to conventional ideas about the evolution of the human intellect.
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  23.  33
    Dorothy L. Cheney & Robert M. Seyfarth (1990). How Monkeys See the World: Inside the Mind of Another Species. University of Chicago Press.
    "This reviewer had to be restrained from stopping people in the street to urge them to read it: They would learn something of the way science is done,...
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  24. Elizabeth S. Spelke & Marc D. Hauser, Visual Representation in the Wild: How Rhesus Monkeys.
    & Visual object representation was studied in free-ranging rhesus monkeys. To facilitate comparison with humans, and to provide a new tool for neurophysiologists, we used a looking time procedure originally developed for studies of human infants. Monkeys’ looking times were measured to displays with one or two distinct objects, separated or together, stationary or moving. Results indicate that rhesus monkeys..
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  25.  23
    Nikos Logothetis, Individuation and Holistic Processing of Faces in Rhesus Monkeys.
    Despite considerable evidence that neural activity in monkeys reflects various aspects of face perception, relatively little is known about monkeys’ face processing abilities. Two characteristics of face processing observed in humans are a subordinate-level entry point, here, the default recognition of faces at the subordinate, rather than basic, level of categorization, and holistic effects, i.e. perception of facial displays as an integrated whole. The present study used an adaptation paradigm to test whether untrained rhesus macaques (Macaca mulatta) display (...)
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  26.  12
    Stefano Borgo, Noemi Spagnoletti, Laure Vieu & Elisabetta Visalberghi (2013). Artifact and Artifact Categorization: Comparing Humans and Capuchin Monkeys. Review of Philosophy and Psychology 4 (3):375-389.
    We aim to show that far-related primates like humans and the capuchin monkeys show interesting correspondences in terms of artifact characterization and categorization. We investigate this issue by using a philosophically-inspired definition of physical artifact which, developed for human artifacts, turns out to be applicable for cross-species comparison. In this approach an artifact is created when an entity is intentionally selected and some capacities attributed to it (often characterizing a purpose). Behavioral studies suggest that this notion of artifact is (...)
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  27.  17
    A. Cowey, P. Stoerig & C. Le Mare (1998). Effects of Unseen Stimuli on Reaction Times to Seen Stimuli in Monkeys with Blindsight. Consciousness and Cognition 7 (3):312-323.
    In three macaque monkeys with unilateral removal of primary visual cortex and in one unoperated monkey, we measured reaction times to a visual target that was presented at a lateral eccentricity of 20o in the normal, left, visual hemifield. When an additional stimulus was presented at the corresponding position in the right hemifield (hemianopic in three of the monkeys), it significantly slowed the reaction time to the left target if it preceded it by delays from 100-500 msec. The (...)
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  28.  9
    Nikos Logothetis, Report Vocal-Tract Resonances as Indexical Cues in Rhesus Monkeys.
    Asif A. Ghazanfar,1,3,* Hjalmar K. Turesson,1,3 statistical pattern recognition [16, 17] and psychophys- Joost X. Maier,1 Ralph van Dinther,2 ics [13, 18–23] have suggested that formants are signif- Roy D. Patterson,2 and Nikos K. Logothetis1 icant contributors to these indexical cues. It is likely, 1Max Planck Institute for Biological Cybernetics then, that detecting formants could have provided 72076 Tuebingen ancestral primates with indexical cues necessary for Germany navigating the complex social interactions that are the 2Centre for the Neural Basis of (...)
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  29.  10
    Roger K. R. Thompson & Timothy M. Flemming (2008). Analogical Apes and Paleological Monkeys Revisited. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 31 (2):149-150.
    We argue that formal analogical reasoning is not a uniquely human trait but is found in chimpanzees, if not in monkeys. We also contest the claim that the relational matching-to-sample task is not exemplary of analogical behavior, and we provide evidence that symbolic-like treatment of relational information can be found in nonhuman species, a point in contention with the relational reinterpretation hypothesis.
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  30.  8
    Frank E. Poirier & Lori J. Fitton (2001). Primate Cultural Worlds: Monkeys, Apes, and Humans. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 24 (2):349-350.
    Monkeys and apes, inhabiting variable environments and subjected to K-selection, exhibit cultural behavior transmitted horizontally and vertically, like cetaceans. Behaviors enhancing better health and nutrition, predator avoidance, or mate selection, can affect differential reproduction.Furthermore, dominance hierarchies and social status not only affect the transmission and acceptance of new behaviors but they may also affect genetic inheritance.
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  31.  6
    Nobuyuki Kawai (2004). Action Planning in Humans and Chimpanzees but Not in Monkeys. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 27 (1):42-43.
    Studies with primates in sequence production tasks reveal that chimpanzees make action plans before initiating responses and making on-line adjustments to spatially exchanged stimuli, whereas such planning isn't evident in monkeys. Although planning may rely on phylogenetically newer regions in the inferior parietal lobe – along with the frontal lobes and basal ganglia – it dates back to as far as five million years ago.
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  32. R. Dosunmu, J. Wu, L. Adwan, B. Maloney, M. R. Basha, C. A. McPherson, G. J. Harry, D. C. Rice, N. H. Zawia & D. K. Lahiri (2009). Lifespan Profiles of Alzheimer's Disease-Associated Genes and Products in Monkeys and Mice. J Alzheimers Dis 18:211-30.
    Alzheimer's disease is characterized by plaques of amyloid-beta peptide, cleaved from amyloid-beta protein precursor . Our hypothesis is that lifespan profiles of AD-associated mRNA and protein levels in monkeys would differ from mice and that differential lifespan expression profiles would be useful to understand human AD pathogenesis. We compared profiles of AbetaPP mRNA, AbetaPP protein, and Abeta levels in rodents and primates. We also tracked a transcriptional regulator of the AbetaPP gene, specificity protein 1 , and the beta amyloid (...)
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  33. J. Wu, M. R. Basha, B. Brock, D. P. Cox, F. Cardozo-Pelaez, C. A. McPherson, J. Harry, D. C. Rice, B. Maloney, D. Chen, D. K. Lahiri & N. H. Zawia (2008). Alzheimer's Disease -Like Pathology in Aged Monkeys After Infantile Exposure to Environmental Metal Lead : Evidence for a Developmental Origin and Environmental Link for AD. J Neurosci 28:3-9.
    The sporadic nature of Alzheimer's disease argues for an environmental link that may drive AD pathogenesis; however, the triggering factors and the period of their action are unknown. Recent studies in rodents have shown that exposure to lead during brain development predetermined the expression and regulation of the amyloid precursor protein and its amyloidogenic beta-amyloid product in old age. Here, we report that the expression of AD-related genes [APP, BACE1 ] as well as their transcriptional regulator were elevated in aged (...)
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  34.  67
    David A. Leopold & Nikos K. Logothetis (1996). Activity Changes in Early Visual Cortex Reflect Monkeys' Percepts During Binocular Rivalry. Nature 379 (6565):549-553.
  35.  4
    A. Whiten (1992). Mind Reading, Pretence and Imitation in Monkeys and Apes. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 15 (1):170-171.
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  36.  1
    Suzanne Chevalier-Skolnikoff (1989). Spontaneous Tool Use and Sensorimotor Intelligence in Cebus Compared with Other Monkeys and Apes. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 12 (3):561.
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  37.  18
    Jessica C. Flack & Frans Bm de Waal (2000). Any Animal Whatever. Darwinian Building Blocks of Morality in Monkeys and Apes. Journal of Consciousness Studies 7 (1-2):1-2.
    To what degree has biology influenced and shaped the development of moral systems? One way to determine the extent to which human moral systems might be the product of natural selection is to explore behaviour in other species that is analogous and perhaps homologous to our own. Many non-human primates, for example, have similar methods to humans for resolving, managing, and preventing conflicts of interests within their groups. Such methods, which include reciprocity and food sharing, reconciliation, consolation, conflict intervention, and (...)
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  38.  22
    Guy A. Orban, David Van Essen & Wim Vanduffel (2004). Comparative Mapping of Higher Visual Areas in Monkeys and Humans. Trends in Cognitive Sciences 8 (7):315-324.
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  39.  3
    Dustin J. Merritt, Daniel Casasanto & Elizabeth M. Brannon (2010). Do Monkeys Think in Metaphors? Representations of Space and Time in Monkeys and Humans. Cognition 117 (2):191-202.
  40.  2
    Denise Piñon & Patricia M. Greenfield (1994). Does Everybody Do It? Hierarchically Organized Sequential Activity in Robots, Birds and Monkeys. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 17 (2):361.
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  41.  5
    Marc Hauser, Susan Perry, Joseph H. Manson, Helen Ball, Michael Williams, Erik Pearson & John Berard (1991). It's All in the Hands of the Beholder: New Data on Free-Ranging Rhesus Monkeys. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 14 (2):342-344.
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  42.  8
    G. A. Orban, D. Essen & W. Vanduffel (2004). Comparative Mapping of Higher Visual Areas in Monkeys and Humans. Trends in Cognitive Sciences 8 (7):315-324.
  43.  37
    Alan Cowey (1995). Blindsight in Monkeys. Nature 373:247-9.
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  44.  5
    Caroline B. Drucker & Elizabeth M. Brannon (2014). Rhesus Monkeys Map Number Onto Space. Cognition 132 (1):57-67.
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  45.  7
    S. Gouteux, C. Thinus-Blanc & J. Vauclair (2001). Rhesus Monkeys Use Geometric and Nongeometric Information During a Reorientation Task. Journal of Experimental Psychology: General 130 (3):505.
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  46.  5
    Jonathan I. Flombaum, Justin A. Junge & Marc D. Hauser (2005). Rhesus Monkeys Spontaneously Compute Addition Operations Over Large Numbers. Cognition 97 (3):315-325.
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  47.  3
    Alia Martin & Laurie R. Santos (2014). The Origins of Belief Representation: Monkeys Fail to Automatically Represent Others’ Beliefs. Cognition 130 (3):300-308.
  48. Roger K. Thomas & Laurie Chase (1980). Relative Numerousness Judgments by Squirrel Monkeys. Bulletin of the Psychonomic Society 16 (2):79-82.
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  49.  10
    Jay Aronson (2002). 'Molecules and Monkeys': George Gaylord Simpson and the Challenge of Molecular Evolution. History and Philosophy of the Life Sciences 24 (3/4):441 - 465.
    In this paper, I analyze George Gaylord Simpson's response to the molecularization of evolutionary biology from his unique perspective as a paleontologist. I do so by exploring his views on early attempts to reconstruct phylogenetic relationships among primates using molecular data. Particular attention is paid to Simpson's role in the evolutionary synthesis of the 1930s and 1940s, as well as his concerns about the rise of molecular biology as a powerful discipline and world-view in the 1960s. I argue that Simpson's (...)
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  50.  32
    David Barner, Justin Wood, Marc Hauser & Susan Carey (2008). Evidence for a Non-Linguistic Distinction Between Singular and Plural Sets in Rhesus Monkeys. Cognition 107 (2):603-622.
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