Search results for 'Moral Personhood' (try it on Scholar)

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  1. Moral Personhood (2010). 3 Developmental Perspective on the Emergence of Moral Personhood James C. Harris. In Eva Feder Kittay & Licia Carlson (eds.), Cognitive Disability and its Challenge to Moral Philosophy. Wiley-Blackwell. 55.score: 1200.0
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  2. Eva Feder Kittay (2005). At the Margins of Moral Personhood. Ethics 116 (1):100-131.score: 180.0
    In this article I examine the proposition that severe cognitive disability is an impediment to moral personhood. Moral personhood, as I understand it here, is articulated in the work of Jeff McMahan as that which confers a special moral status on a person. I rehearse the metaphysical arguments about the nature of personhood that ground McMahan’s claims regarding the moral status of the “congenitally severely mentally retarded” (CSMR for short). These claims, I argue, (...)
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  3. Kevin Gibson (2011). Toward an Intermediate Position on Corporate Moral Personhood. Journal of Business Ethics 101 (S1):71-81.score: 144.0
    Models of moral responsibility rely on foundational views about moral agency. Many scholars believe that only humans can be moral agents, and therefore business needs to create models that foster greater receptivity to others through ethical dialog. This view leads to a difficulty if no specific person is the sole causal agent for an act, or if something comes about through aggregated action in a corporate setting. An alternate approach suggests that corporations are moral agents sufficiently (...)
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  4. Raymond S. Pfeiffer (1990). The Central Distinction in the Theory of Corporate Moral Personhood. Journal of Business Ethics 9 (6):473-480.score: 120.0
    Peter French has argued that conglomerate collectivities such as business corporations are moral persons and that aggregate collectivities such as lynch mobs are not. Two arguments are advanced to show that French's claim is flawed. First, the distinction between aggregates and conglomerates is, at best, a distinction of degree, not kind. Moreover, some aggregates show evidence of moral personhood. Second, French's criterion for distinguishing aggregates and conglomerates is based on inadequate grounds. Application of the criterion to specific (...)
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  5. John Chambers Christopher (2007). Culture, Moral Topographies, and Interactive Personhood. Journal of Theoretical and Philosophical Psychology 27 (2-1):170-191.score: 120.0
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  6. Steve Matthews (1998). Personal Identity, Multiple Personality Disorder, and Moral Personhood. Philosophical Psychology 11 (1):67-88.score: 114.0
    Marya Schechtman argues that psychological continuity accounts of personal identity, as represented by Derek Parfit's account, fail to escape the circularity objection. She claims that Parfit's deployment of quasi-memory (and other quasi-psychological) states to escape circularity implicitly commit us to an implausible view of human psychology. Schechtman suggests that what is lacking here is a coherence condition, and that this is something essential in any account of personal identity. In response to this I argue first that circularity may be escaped (...)
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  7. Hud Hudson (1999). Temporal Parts and Moral Personhood. Philosophical Studies 93 (3):299-316.score: 114.0
    Three Dimensionalists and Four Dimensionalists are engaged in a debate on the topics of persistence and mereology. In this paper, I explore implications of Four Dimensionalism for the formulation of the criterion of personhood and on the question of which individuals satisfy that criterion. In my discussion I argue that the Four Dimensionalist has reason to identify a human person with a proper part of a human organism, and that the Four Dimensionalist has reason to believe that if there (...)
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  8. E. Christian Brugger (2009). “Other Selves”: Moral and Legal Proposals Regarding the Personhood of Cryopreserved Human Embryos. Theoretical Medicine and Bioethics 30 (2):105-129.score: 108.0
    This essay has two purposes. The first is to argue that our moral duties towards human embryos should be assessed in light of the Golden Rule by asking the normative question, “how would I want to be treated if I were an embryo?” Some reject the proposition “I was an embryo” on the basis that embryos should not be recognized as persons. This essay replies to five common arguments denying the personhood of human embryos: (1) that early human (...)
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  9. Francis Dunlop (1981). Moral Personhood: A Tentative Analysis. Journal of Moral Education 11 (1):3-17.score: 102.0
    Abstract The paper is an attempt to provide a brief analysis of moral experience and moral agency set firmly within an experiential analysis of the human person. The approach yields a set of ?moral components? that the moral educator should take into account, but also enables him to understand their significance in human life. The analysis stresses the importance of ?moral character?, which is seen partly in terms of the blind development of innate psychic capacities (...)
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  10. Chryssoula Lemonidou, Elizabeth Papathanassoglou, Margarita Giannakopoulou, Elisabeth Patiraki & Danai Papadatou (2004). Moral Professional Personhood: Ethical Reflections During Initial Clinical Encounters in Nursing Education. Nursing Ethics 11 (2):122-137.score: 102.0
    Moral agency is an important constituent of the nursing role. We explored issues of ethical development in Greek nursing students during clinical practice at the beginning of their studies. Specifically, we aimed to explore students’ lived experience of ethics, and their perceptions and understanding of encountered ethical conflicts through phenomenological analysis of written narratives. The process of developing an awareness of personal values through empathizing with patients was identified as the core theme of the students’ experience. Six more common (...)
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  11. David C. Wilson (1984). Functionalism and Moral Personhood: One View Considered. Philosophy and Phenomenological Research 44 (June):521-530.score: 100.0
    Daniel dennett has offered a set of necessary and sufficient conditions for something's being the proper object of our moral commitment, That is, For something's being a person. Strict application of these largely pragmatic conditions, However, Would result in a moral community with quite a surprising membership roster, Because of both who is on it and who isn't. The problem is that "your" being a person should amount to more than a function of "my" goals and cleverness.
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  12. Adam Kadlac (2010). Humanizing Personhood. Ethical Theory and Moral Practice 13 (4):421 - 437.score: 96.0
    This paper explores the debate between personists, who argue that the concept of a person if of central importance for moral thought, and personists, who argue that the concept of a human being is of greater moral significance. On the one hand, it argues that normative naturalism, the most ambitious defense of the humanist position, fails to identify moral standards with standards of human behavior and thereby fails to undermine the moral significance of personhood. At (...)
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  13. H. Tristram Engelhardt Jr (1993). Personhood, Moral Strangers, and the Evil of Abortion: The Painful Experience of Post-Modernity. Journal of Medicine and Philosophy 18 (4):419-421.score: 96.0
    The epistemological and sociological consequences of post-modernity include the inability to show moral strangers, in terms they can see as binding, the moral wrongness of activities such as abortion. Such activities can be perceived as morally disordered within a content-full moral narrative, but not outside of the context it brings. Though one can salvage something of the Enlightenment project of justifying a morality that can bind moral strangers, one is left with moral and metaphysical views (...)
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  14. Christian Smith (2003). Moral, Believing Animals: Human Personhood and Culture. Oxford University Press.score: 96.0
    What kind of animals are human beings? And how do our visions of the human shape our theories of social action and institutions? In Moral, Believing Animals>, Christian Smith advances a creative theory of human persons and culture that offers innovative, challenging answers to these and other fundamental questions in sociological, cultural, and religious theory. Smith suggests that human beings have a peculiar set of capacities and proclivities that distinguishes them significantly from other animals on this planet. Despite the (...)
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  15. Michael J. Phillips (1992). Corporate Moral Personhood and Three Conceptions of the Corporation. Business Ethics Quarterly 2 (4):435-459.score: 96.0
    Despite some exceptions, the business ethics literature on the moral responsibility of corporations does not emphasize a subject critical to that inquiry: the general nature of corporations. This article attempts to lessen the imbalance by describing three conceptions of the corporation that have been prominent in twentieth century legal theorizing, and by sketching their implications for the moral responsibility of corporations. These three conceptions, at least two of which have counterparts in the philosophical and organizational theory literature, are (...)
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  16. Thomas W. Smythe (1985). Problems About Corporate Moral Personhood. Journal of Value Inquiry 19 (4):327-333.score: 96.0
    According to peter french, A corporation can be construed as a moral person in the same sense that you and I are persons. Whether this view is tenable is an open question. I examine the objections to this view made in the recent literature and find them wanting. I deal with the questions whether corporations can have intentions, Rights, And consciousness.
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  17. Rita C. Manning (1988). Dismemberment, Divorce and Hostile Takeovers: A Comment on Corporate Moral Personhood. [REVIEW] Journal of Business Ethics 7 (8):639 - 643.score: 96.0
    We can explain our intuitions about corporate takeover cases by appeal to Peter French's picture of the corporation as a moral person. He argues that corporations are persons in much the same sense as you and I, and are entitled to the same rights as humans. On this analysis, takeovers are murders, attempted murders, attempts to enslave, etc. I want to explore the consequences of this view for corporate takeovers. I shall argue that, though French can explain why our (...)
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  18. Jeremy A. Frimer & Lawrence J. Walker (2008). Towards a New Paradigm of Moral Personhood. Journal of Moral Education 37 (3):333-356.score: 96.0
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  19. James C. Harris (2010). Developmental Perspective on the Emergence of Moral Personhood. In Eva Feder Kittay & Licia Carlson (eds.), Cognitive Disability and its Challenge to Moral Philosophy. Wiley-Blackwell. 55--73.score: 96.0
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  20. Carson Strong (2006). Preembryo Personhood: An Assessment of the President's Council Arguments. [REVIEW] Theoretical Medicine and Bioethics 27 (5):433-453.score: 90.0
    The President’s Council on Bioethics has addressed the moral status of human preembryos in its reports on stem cell research and human therapeutic cloning. Although the Council has been criticized for being hand-picked to favor the right-to-life viewpoint concerning human preembryos, it has embraced the idea that the right-to-life position should be defended in secular terms. This is an important feature of the Council’s work, and it demonstrates a recognition of the need for genuine engagement between opposing sides in (...)
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  21. Sophia Isako Wong (2007). The Moral Personhood of Individuals Labeled “Mentally Retarded”: A Rawlsian Response to Nussbaum. Social Theory and Practice 33 (4):579-594.score: 90.0
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  22. Hud Hudson (1996). Feinberg on the Criterion of Moral Personhood. Journal of Applied Philosophy 13 (3):311-318.score: 90.0
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  23. Owen Flanagan (1991). Book Review:Moral Personhood: An Essay in the Philosophy of Moral Psychology. G. E. Scott. [REVIEW] Ethics 101 (4):866-.score: 90.0
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  24. Stephen Davies (1991). On Moral Personhood: Philosophy, Literature, Criticism and Self-Understanding (Review). Philosophy and Literature 15 (1):166-167.score: 90.0
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  25. William J. Mohan (1993). Moral Personhood. International Studies in Philosophy 25 (3):147-149.score: 90.0
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  26. Eva Schaper (1991). Richard Eldridge, On Moral Personhood: Philosophy, Literature, Criticism, and Self-Understanding Reviewed By. Philosophy in Review 11 (4):238-240.score: 90.0
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  27. C. G. Prado (1991). GE Scott, Moral Personhood: An Essay in the Philosophy of Moral Psychology Reviewed By. Philosophy in Review 11 (4):291-292.score: 90.0
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  28. R. Elliot (1992). Review Essay of G. Scott, Moral Personhood and M. Goodman, What Is a Person? Bioethics 6 (1):41-60.score: 90.0
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  29. R. Elliot (1992). What Is a Person? Edited by Michael F. Goodman, and Moral Personhood: An Essay in the Philosophy of Moral Psychology by GE Scott. Bioethics 6 (1):41-60.score: 90.0
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  30. Sauravpran Goswami (1998). Moral Personhood. Indian Philosophical Quarterly 25:517-526.score: 90.0
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  31. G. E. Scott (1990). Moral Personhood: An Essay in the Philosophy of Moral Psychology. State University of New York Press.score: 90.0
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  32. Robin Shoaps (forthcoming). Moral Irony and Moral Personhood in Sakapultek Discourse and Culture. Stance: Sociolinguistic Perspectives.score: 90.0
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  33. Stephen Wilmot (2001). Corporate Moral Responsibility: What Can We Infer From Our Understanding of Organisations? [REVIEW] Journal of Business Ethics 30 (2):161 - 169.score: 84.0
    The question of corporate moral responsibility – whether corporate bodies can be held morally responsible for their actions – has been debated by a number of writers since the 1970s. This discussion is intended to add to that debate, and focuses for that purpose on our understanding of the organisation. Though the integrity of the organisation has been called into question by the postmodern view of organisations, that view does not necessarily rule out the attribution of corporate agency, any (...)
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  34. Lawrence B. Solum (1992). Legal Personhood for Artificial Intelligences. North Carolina Law Review 70:1231.score: 84.0
    Could an artificial intelligence become a legal person? As of today, this question is only theoretical. No existing computer program currently possesses the sort of capacities that would justify serious judicial inquiry into the question of legal personhood. The question is nonetheless of some interest. Cognitive science begins with the assumption that the nature of human intelligence is computational, and therefore, that the human mind can, in principle, be modelled as a program that runs on a computer. Artificial intelligence (...)
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  35. S. Matthew Liao (2012). The Genetic Account of Moral Status: A Defense. Journal of Moral Philosophy 9 (2):265-277.score: 78.0
    Christopher Grau argues that the genetic basis for moral agency account of rightholding is problematic because it fails to grant all human beings the moral status of rightholding; it grants the status of rightholding to entities that do not intuitively deserve such status; and it assumes that the genetic basis for moral agency has intrinsic/final value, but the genetic basis for moral agency only has instrumental value. Grau also argues that those who are inclined to hold (...)
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  36. D. Christopher Ralston & Justin Ho (2007). Disability, Humanity, and Personhood: A Survey of Moral Concepts. Journal of Medicine and Philosophy 32 (6):619 – 633.score: 78.0
    Three of the articles included in this issue of the Journal of Medicine and Philosophy - Ron Amundson and Shari Tresky's "On a Bioethical Challenge to Disability Rights"; Rachel Cooper's "Can It Be a Good Thing to Be Deaf?"; and Mark T. Brown's "The Potential of the Human Embryo" - interact (in various ways) with the concepts of disability, humanity, and personhood and their normative dimensions. As one peruses these articles, it becomes apparent that terms like "disability," "human being," (...)
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  37. Marcus Arvan (2014). A Better, Dual Theory of Human Rights. Philosophical Forum 45 (1):17-47.score: 72.0
    Human rights theory and practice have long been stuck in a rut. Although disagreement is the norm in philosophy and social-political practice, the sheer depth and breadth of disagreement about human rights is truly unusual. Human rights theorists and practitioners disagree – wildly in many cases – over just about every issue: what human rights are, what they are for, how many of them there are, how they are justified, what human interests or capacities they are supposed to protect, what (...)
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  38. Benjamin Vilhauer (2013). Persons, Punishment, and Free Will Skepticism. Philosophical Studies 162 (2):143-163.score: 72.0
    The purpose of this paper is to provide a justification of punishment which can be endorsed by free will skeptics, and which can also be defended against the "using persons as mere means" objection. Free will skeptics must reject retributivism, that is, the view that punishment is just because criminals deserve to suffer based on their actions. Retributivists often claim that theirs is the only justification on which punishment is constrained by desert, and suppose that non-retributive justifications must therefore endorse (...)
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  39. Jason T. Eberl (2012). Metaphysical and Moral Status of Cryopreserved Embryos. The Linacre Quarterly 79 (3):304-315.score: 72.0
    Those who oppose human embryonic stem cell research argue for a clear position on the metaphysical and moral status of human embryos. This position does not differ whether the embryo is present inside its mother’s reproductive tract or in a cryopreservation tank. It is worth examining, however, whether an embryo in “suspended animation” has the same status as one actively developing in utero. I will explore this question from the perspective of Thomas Aquinas’s metaphysical account of human nature. I (...)
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  40. Jerome C. Wakefield (2009). Mental Disorder and Moral Responsibility: Disorders of Personhood as Harmful Dysfunctions, With Special Reference to Alcoholism. Philosophy, Psychiatry, and Psychology 16 (1):91-99.score: 72.0
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  41. Lawrence A. Locke (1990). Personhood and Moral Responsibility. Law and Philosophy 9 (1):39 - 66.score: 72.0
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  42. Dominic Wilkinson, Guy Kahane & Julian Savulescu (2008). “Neglected Personhood” and Neglected Questions: Remarks on the Moral Significance of Consciousness. American Journal of Bioethics 8 (9):31 – 33.score: 72.0
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  43. Russell Blackford (2007). Differing Vulnerabilities: The Moral Significance of Lockean Personhood. American Journal of Bioethics 7 (1):70-71.score: 72.0
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  44. Donald Algeo (1981). Abortion, Personhood, and Moral Rights. The Monist 64 (4):543-549.score: 72.0
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  45. Philip Selznick (1995). Personhood and Moral Obligation. In Amitai Etzioni (ed.), New Communitarian Thinking: Persons, Virtues, Institutions, and Communities. University Press of Virginia. 110--25.score: 72.0
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  46. Simon Cushing (2003). Against "Humanism&Quot;: Speciesism, Personhood, and Preference. Journal of Social Philosophy 34 (4):556–571.score: 66.0
    Article responds to the criticism of speciesism that it is somehow less immoral than other -isms by showing that this is a mistake resting on an inadequate taxonomy of the various -isms. Criticizes argument by Bonnie Steinbock that preference to your own species is not immoral by comparison with racism of comparable level.
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  47. A. McGee (2013). The Moral Status of Babies. Journal of Medical Ethics 39 (5):345-348.score: 66.0
    In their controversial paper ‘After-birth abortion’, Alberto Giubilini and Francesca Minerva argue that there is no rational basis for allowing abortion but prohibiting infanticide (‘after-birth abortion’). We ought in all consistency either to allow both or prohibit both. This paper rejects their claim, arguing that much-neglected considerations in philosophical discussions of this issue are capable of explaining why we currently permit abortion in some circumstances, while prohibiting infanticide.
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  48. P. Biegler (2013). Public Distress as a Moral Consideration in After-Birth Abortion. Journal of Medical Ethics 39 (5):323-323.score: 66.0
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  49. Louis M. Guenin (2008). The Morality of Embryo Use. Cambridge University Press.score: 60.0
    Is it permissible to use a human embryo in stem cell research, or in general as a means for benefit of others? Acknowledging each embryo as an object of moral concern, Louis M.Guenin argues that it is morally permissible to decline intrauterine transfer of an embryo formed outside the body, and that from this permission and the duty of beneficence, there follows a consensus justification for using donated embryos in service of humanitarian ends. He then proceeds to show how (...)
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  50. Sirkku Kristiina Hellsten (2000). Towards an Alternative Approach to Personhood in the End of Life Questions. Theoretical Medicine and Bioethics 21 (6):515-536.score: 60.0
    Within the Western bioethical framework, we make adistinction between two dominant interpretations of the meaning of moral personhood: thenaturalist and the humanist one. While both interpretations of moral personhood claim topromote individual autonomy and rights, they end up with very different normativeviews on the practical and legal measures needed to realize these values in every daylife. Particularly when we talk about the end of life issues it appears that in general thearguments for euthanasia are drawn from (...)
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