Search results for 'Moral Worth' (try it on Scholar)

1000+ found
Sort by:
  1. Kelly Sorensen (2010). Effort and Moral Worth. Ethical Theory and Moral Practice 13 (1):89 - 109.score: 246.0
    One of the factors that contributes to an agent’s praiseworthiness and blameworthiness — his or her moral worth — is effort. On the one hand, agents who act effortlessly seem to have high moral worth. On the other hand, agents who act effortfully seem to have high moral worth as well. I explore and explain this pair of intuitions and the contour of our views about associated cases.
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  2. Jill Hernandez (2010). Impermissibility and Kantian Moral Worth. Ethical Theory and Moral Practice 13 (4):403 - 419.score: 246.0
    Samuel Kerstein argues that an asymmetry between moral worth and maxims prevents Kant from accepting a category of acts that are impermissible, but have moral worth. Kerstein contends that an act performed from the motive of duty should be considered as a candidate for moral worth, even if the action's maxim turns out to be impermissible, since moral worth depends on the correct moral motivation of an act, rather than on the (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  3. Thomas Douglas (2014). The Relationship Between Effort and Moral Worth: Three Amendments to Sorensen's Model. [REVIEW] Ethical Theory and Moral Practice 17 (2):325-334.score: 246.0
    Kelly Sorensen defends a model of the relationship between effort and moral worth in which the effort exerted in performing a morally desirable action contributes positively to the action’s moral worth, but the effort required to perform the action detracts from its moral worth. I argue that Sorensen’s model, though on the right track, is mistaken in three ways. First, it fails to capture the relevance of counterfactual effort to moral worth. Second, (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  4. Nomy Arpaly (2002). Moral Worth. Journal of Philosophy 99 (5):223-245.score: 240.0
    I argue that a right action has moral worth if and only if it is done for the right reasons - that is, for its right-making features. The reasons the agent acts on have to be identical to the reasons for which the action is right. I argue that Kantians are wrong in thinking that a right action has moral worth iff it is done because the agent thinks it is right, giving examples of morally worthy (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  5. Saul Smilansky (2005). The Paradoxical Relationship Between Morality and Moral Worth. Metaphilosophy 36 (4):490-500.score: 240.0
    If the social environment were arranged so that most people in the West could, with relatively little effort, be morally good to a reasonable degree, would this be a good thing? I claim that it is not entirely obvious that we should say yes. This is no idle question: mainstream Western social morality today seems to be approaching the prospect for a morality that is not taxing. This question has substantial theoretical interest because exploring it will help us understand the (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  6. Thomas Douglas (2014). Enhancing Moral Conformity and Enhancing Moral Worth. Neuroethics 7 (1):75-91.score: 240.0
    It is plausible that we have moral reasons to become better at conforming to our moral reasons. However, it is not always clear what means to greater moral conformity we should adopt. John Harris has recently argued that we have reason to adopt traditional, deliberative means in preference to means that alter our affective or conative states directly—that is, without engaging our deliberative faculties. One of Harris’ concerns about direct means is that they would produce only a (...)
    Direct download (7 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  7. Steven Sverdlik (2001). Kant, Nonaccidentalness and the Availability of Moral Worth. Journal of Ethics 5 (4):293-313.score: 216.0
    Contemporary Kantians who defend Kant''s view of the superiority of the sense of duty as a form of motivation appeal to various ideas. Some say, if only implicitly, that the sense of duty is always ``available'''' to an agent, when she has a moral obligation. Some, like Barbara Herman, say that the sense of duty provides a ``nonaccidental'''' connection between an agent''s motivation and the act''s rightness. In this paper I show that the ``availability'''' and ``nonaccidentalness'''' arguments are in (...)
    Direct download (7 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  8. Robert Johnson (2009). Good Will and the Moral Worth of Acting From Duty. In Thomas E. Hill (ed.), The Blackwell Guide to Kant's Ethics. Wiley-Blackwell.score: 180.0
    The first section of the Groundwork begins “It is impossible to imagine anything at all in the world, or even beyond it, that can be called good without qualification— except a good will.”1 Kant’s explanation and defense of this claim is followed by an explanation and defense of another related claim, that only actions performed out of duty have moral worth. He explains that actions performed out of duty are those done from respect for the moral law, (...)
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  9. Richard G. Henson (1979). What Kant Might Have Said: Moral Worth and the Overdetermination of Dutiful Action. Philosophical Review 88 (1):39-54.score: 180.0
    My purpose is to account for some oddities in what Kant did and did not say about "moral worth," and for another in what commentators tell us about his intent. The stone with which I hope to dispatch these several birds is-as one would expect a philosopher's stone to be-a distinction. I distinguish between two things Kant might have had in mind under the heading of moral worth. They come readily to mind when one both takes (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  10. Philip Stratton-Lake (2000). Kant, Duty, and Moral Worth. Routledge.score: 180.0
    Kant, Duty and Moral Worth tackles the debate over whether or not Kant said moral actions have worth only if they are carried out from duty or whether actions carried out from mixed motives can be good. Stratton-Lake offers a unique account of acting from duty which utilizes the distinction between primary and secondary motives. He maintains that moral law should not be understood as normative moral reason but as playing a transcendental role. Thus, (...)
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  11. Aristophanes Koutoungos (2005). Moral Coherence, Moral Worth and Explanations of Moral Motivation. Acta Analytica 20 (3):59-79.score: 180.0
    Moral internalism and moral externalism compete over the best explanation of the link between judgment and relevant motivation but, it is argued, they differ at best only verbally. The internalist rational-conceptual nature of the link’ as accounted by M. Smith in The Moral Problem is contrasted to the externalist, also rational, link that requires in addition support from the agent’s psychological-dispositional profile; the internalist link, however, is found to depend crucially on a, similarly to the externalist, psychologically (...)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  12. Christopher Martin (2011). Education Without Moral Worth? Kantian Moral Theory and the Obligation to Educate Others. Journal of Philosophy of Education 45 (3):475-492.score: 180.0
    This article examines the possibility of a Kantian justification of the intrinsic moral worth of education. The author critiques a recent attempt to secure such justification via Kant's notion of the Kingdom of Ends. He gives four reasons why such an account would deny any intrinsic moral worth to education. He concludes with a tentative justification of his own and a call for a more comprehensive engagement between Kant's moral theory and the philosophy of education (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  13. Walter E. Schaller (1992). The Relation of Moral Worth to the Good Will in Kant's Ethics. Journal of Philosophical Research 17:351-382.score: 180.0
    I consider three questions concerning the relation of the good will to the moral worth of actions. (1) Does a good will consist simply in acting from the motive of duty? (2) Does acting from the motive of duty presuppose that one has a good will? (3) Does the fact that one has a good wilI entail that all of one’s duty-fulfilling actions have moral worth, even if they are not (directly) motivated by duty? I argue (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  14. Thomas E. Hill (2002). Human Welfare and Moral Worth: Kantian Perspectives. Oxford University Press.score: 180.0
    Thomas Hill, a leading figure in the recent development of Kantian moral philosophy, presents a set of essays exploring the implications of basic Kantian ideas for practical issues. The first part of the book provides background in central themes in Kant's ethics; the second part discusses questions regarding human welfare; the third focuses on moral worth-the nature and grounds of moral assessment of persons as deserving esteem or blame. Hill shows moral, political, and social philosophers (...)
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  15. J. Gert (2012). Moral Worth, Supererogation, and the Justifying/Requiring Distinction. Philosophical Review 121 (4):611-618.score: 180.0
    Julia Markovits has recently argued for what she calls the ‘Coincident Reasons Thesis’: the thesis that one’s action is morally worthy if and only if one’s motivating reasons for acting mirror, in content and strength, the reasons that explain why the action ought, morally, to be performed. This thesis assumes that the structure of motivating reasons is sufficiently similar to the structure of normative reasons that the required coincidence in content and strength is a genuine possibility. But because motivating reasons (...)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  16. Christopher Michaelson (2009). Meaningful Work and Moral Worth. Business and Professional Ethics Journal 28 (1/4):27-48.score: 180.0
    In general, meaningful work has been conceived to be a matter of institutional obligation and individual choice. In other words, solong as the institution has fulfilled its objective moral obligation to make meaningful work possible, it is up to the subjective volition of the individual to choose or not to choose work that is perceived to be meaningful. However, this conception is incomplete in at least two ways. First, it neglects the role of institutional volition; that is, it does (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  17. Saul Smilansky (1997). Moral Accountancy and Moral Worth. Metaphilosophy 28 (1‐2):123-134.score: 180.0
    People do good or bad things, and get or do not get good or bad credit for their actions, depending (in part) on knowledge of their actions. I attempt to unfold some of the interconnections between these matters, and between them and the achievement of moral worth. The main conclusion is that the heights of moral worth seem to appear in the oddest places.
    Direct download (8 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  18. Norman Ford (2006). Moral Worth and Inviolability of Unborn Children. Chisholm Health Ethics Bulletin 11 (3):1.score: 180.0
    Ford, Norman The moral worth and dignity of the unborn child varies according to peoples' fundamental religious and personal beliefs on what constitutes a human person. The antithetical views on the moral value of the unborn child are due to different philosophies, which admits the existence and meaningfulness of nonmaterial reality and the other that practically denies both.
    No categories
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  19. Jens Timmermann (2009). Acting From Duty: Inclination, Reason and Moral Worth. In , Kant's Groundwork of the Metaphysics of Morals: A Critical Guide. Cambridge University Press.score: 158.0
    Section I of Kant's Groundwork of the Metaphysics of Morals is meant to lead us from our everyday conception of morality to the supreme principle of all moral action, officially christened the ‘categorical imperative’ some twenty Academy pages further into the treatise. It is quite striking that in this first section Kant dispenses with the notorious technical language that pervades not just other parts of the Groundwork but also most of the remaining philosophical writings of the critical period. The (...)
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  20. Alessandro Lanteri (2009). Judgements of Intentionality and Moral Worth: Experimental Challenges to Hindriks. Philosophical Quarterly 59 (237):713-720.score: 156.0
    Joshua Knobe found that people are more likely to describe an action as intentional if it has had a bad outcome than a good outcome, and to blame a bad outcome than to praise a good one. These asymmetries raised numerous questions about lay moral judgement. Frank Hindriks recently proposed that one acts intentionally if one fails to comply with a normative reason against performing the action, that moral praise requires appropriate motivation, whereas moral blame does not, (...)
    Direct download (8 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  21. Robert Hanna (2006). Review: Human Welfare and Moral Worth: Kantian Perspectives. [REVIEW] Journal of Moral Philosophy 3 (2):237-240.score: 156.0
  22. Kelly Sorensen (2014). Counterfactual Situations and Moral Worth. Journal of Moral Philosophy 11 (3):294-319.score: 156.0
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  23. Rodrigo Jungmann de Castro (2005). Is Moral Worth Compatible with Cooperating Inclinations? Princípios 12 (17-18):05-18.score: 156.0
    la82 12.00 Normal 0 21 false false false PT-BR X-NONE X-NONE MicrosoftInternetExplorer4 /* Style Definitions */ table.MsoNormalTable {mso-style-name:"Tabela normal"; mso-tstyle-rowband-size:0; mso-tstyle-colband-size:0; mso-style-noshow:yes; mso-style-priority:99; mso-style-qformat:yes; mso-style-parent:""; mso-padding-alt:0cm 5.4pt 0cm 5.4pt; mso-para-margin-top:0cm; mso-para-margin-right:0cm; mso-para-margin-bottom:10.0pt; mso-para-margin-left:0cm; line-height:115%; mso-pagination:widow-orphan; font-size:11.0pt; font-family:"Calibri","sans-serif"; mso-ascii-font-family:Calibri; mso-ascii-theme-font:minor-latin; mso-hansi-font-family:Calibri; mso-hansi-theme-font:minor-latin; mso-fareast-language:EN-US;} Algumas passagens bastante controversas dos Fundamentos da Metafísica dos Costumes sáo comumente interpretados como se Kant propusesse a tese de que as ações náo podem ter qualquer valor moral quando estiverem acompanhadas de inclinações ( Neigungen ) favoráveis (...)
    No categories
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  24. Rodrigo Jungmann de Castro (2010). Is Moral Worth Compatible with Cooperating Inclinations? Princípios 12 (17-18):05-18.score: 156.0
    Algumas passagens bastante controversas dos Fundamentos da Metafísica dos Costumes sáo comumente interpretados como se Kant propusesse a tese de que as ações náo podem ter qualquer valor moral quando estiverem acompanhadas de inclinações ( Neigungen ) favoráveis a tais ações. O que resulta dessa interpretaçáo é uma retrato de Kant como um severo defensor de uma moralidade em que sentimentos de compaixáo e assemelhados nada acrescentam ao valor moral de uma açáo, e em vez disso, o solapam. (...)
    No categories
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  25. Sarah Stroud (2007). Moral Worth and Rationality as Acting on Good Reasons. [REVIEW] Philosophical Studies 134 (3):449 - 456.score: 150.0
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  26. Allen W. Wood (2003). Kantianism, Moral Worth and Human Welfare. [REVIEW] Philosophical Quarterly 53 (213):587–595.score: 150.0
    Direct download (7 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  27. Thomas E. Hill (1998). Punishment, Conscience, and Moral Worth. Southern Journal of Philosophy 36 (S1):51-71.score: 150.0
  28. Holly M. Smith (1991). Varieties of Moral Worth and Moral Credit. Ethics 101 (2):279-303.score: 150.0
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  29. Kelly Sorensen (2004). The Paradox of Moral Worth. Journal of Philosophy 101 (9):465 - 483.score: 150.0
  30. Paul Benson (1987). Moral Worth. Philosophical Studies 51 (3):365 - 382.score: 150.0
  31. Norman O. Dahl (1986). Obligation and Moral Worth: Reflections on Prichard and Kant. Philosophical Studies 50 (3):369 - 399.score: 150.0
  32. Elizabeth Lane Beardsley (1957). Moral Worth and Moral Credit. Philosophical Review 66 (3):304-328.score: 150.0
  33. Richard B. Brandt (1941). An Emotional Theory of the Judgment of Moral Worth. Ethics 52 (1):41-79.score: 150.0
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  34. Mathieu Doucet, Between Virtue and Vice: Moral Worth for the Rest of Us.score: 150.0
    Thesis (Ph.D, Philosophy) -- Queen's University, 2009-08-31 12:18:30.156.
    No categories
    Translate to English
    | Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  35. Kurt Baier (1970). Moral Value and Moral Worth. The Monist 54 (1):18-30.score: 150.0
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  36. Samuel J. Kerstein (2003). Review: Stratton-Lake, Duty and Moral Worth. Ethics 113 (3):721-724.score: 150.0
  37. Samuel V. Bruton (2003). Review: Stratton-Lake, Kant, Duty and Moral Worth. Utilitas 15 (02):248-.score: 150.0
  38. Sharon E. Sytsma (1997). Compassion and Moral Worth. Dialogue 36 (03):583-.score: 150.0
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  39. Michael Weber (2003). The Motive of Duty and the Nature of Emotions: Kantian Reflections on Moral Worth. Canadian Journal of Philosophy 33 (2):183 - 202.score: 150.0
    As a result there is a considerable literature on the topic. I think, however, that the treatment in the literature is incomplete because there is a failure to examine the relevant emotions in significant detail, and in particular to consider their complexity and the conditions of their warrant. As a result, both defenses and critiques of the motive of duty in terms of reliability are inadequate as they stand.
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  40. Ralph C. S. Walker (2002). Kant, Duty, and Moral Worth. International Philosophical Quarterly 42 (2):265-267.score: 150.0
  41. Stephen Napier (ed.) (2011). Persons, Moral Worth, and Embryos: A Critical Analysis of Pro-Choice Arguments. Springer.score: 150.0
    Given the issues discussed and that the arguments in critical focus are fairly new, the collection provides a novel, comprehensive, and rigorous analysis of contemporary pro-choice arguments.”.
    No categories
    Translate to English
    | Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  42. Samuel J. Kerstein (1999). The Kantian Moral Worth of Actions Contrary to Duty. Zeitschrift für Philosophische Forschung 53 (4):530 - 552.score: 150.0
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  43. Nelson Potter (1996). Kant and the Moral Worth of Actions. Southern Journal of Philosophy 34 (2):225-241.score: 150.0
  44. Walter E. Schaller (1993). Should Kantians Care About Moral Worth? Dialogue 32 (01):25-.score: 150.0
    No categories
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  45. Keith Simmons (1989). Kant on Moral Worth. History of Philosophy Quarterly 6 (1):85 - 100.score: 150.0
  46. R. W. Beardsmore (1969). Consequences and Moral Worth. Analysis 29 (6):177 - 186.score: 150.0
    No categories
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  47. Samuel V. Bruton (2003). Philip Stratton-Lake, Kant, Duty and Moral Worth, London, Routledge, 2000, Pp. Xi + 153. Utilitas 15 (2):248-249.score: 150.0
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  48. Howard J. Curzer (1997). From Duty, Moral Worth, Good Will. Dialogue 36 (02):287-.score: 150.0
    No categories
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  49. Samuel J. Kerstein (2004). Review: Hill, Human Welfare and Moral Worth: Kantian Perspectives. Ethics 114 (2):350-353.score: 150.0
  50. Godfrey B. Tangwa (2001). Moral Agency, Moral Worth and the Question of Double Standards in Medical Research in Developing Countries. Developing World Bioethics 1 (2):156–162.score: 150.0
    Direct download (9 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
1 — 50 / 1000