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Search results for 'Moral repair' (try it on Scholar)

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  1. Jeff Frank (2011). Love and Ruin(S): Robert Frost on Moral Repair. Educational Theory 61 (5):587-600.score: 120.0
    This essay begins where Alasdair MacIntyre's After Virtue begins: facing a moral world in ruin. MacIntyre argues that this predicament leaves us with a choice: we can follow the path of Friedrich Nietzsche, accepting this moral destruction and attempting to create lives in a rootless, uncertain world, or the path of Aristotle, working to reclaim a world in which close-knit communities sustain human practices that make it possible for us to flourish. Jeff Frank rejects MacIntyre's framework and in (...)
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  2. Margaret Urban Walker (2006). Moral Repair: Reconstructing Moral Relations After Wrongdoing. Cambridge.score: 120.0
    1. What. Is. Moral. Repair? A woman is at home in an isolated house by the sea. It is night, and she sits on the terrace. When a car turns in toward the house, the woman gets a gun. When she hears her husband's voice, she puts the gun away  ...
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  3. Alisa L. Carse & Lynne Tirrell (2010). Forgiving Grave Wrongs. In Christopher Allers & Marieke Smit (eds.), Forgiveness In Perspective. Rodopi Press.score: 90.0
    We introduce what we call the Emergent Model of forgiving, which is a process-based relational model conceptualizing forgiving as moral and normative repair in the wake of grave wrongs. In cases of grave wrongs, which shatter the victim’s life, the Classical Model of transactional forgiveness falls short of illuminating how genuine forgiveness can be achieved. In a climate of persistent threat and distrust, expressions of remorse, rituals and gestures of apology, and acts of reparation are unable to secure (...)
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  4. Elizabeth A. Cole (2008). Apology, Forgiveness, and Moral Repair. Ethics and International Affairs 22 (4):421-428.score: 90.0
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  5. Elizabeth V. Spelman (2008). Moral Repair: Reconstructing Moral Relations After Wrongdoing (Review). Hypatia 23 (4):pp. 228-233.score: 90.0
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  6. Elizabeth V. Spelman (2008). Moral Repair: Reconstructing Moral Relations After Wrongdoingby Margaret Urban Walker. Hypatia 23 (4):228-233.score: 90.0
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  7. Cheshire Calhoun (2007). Moral Repair: Reconstructing Moral Relations After Wrongdoing Margaret Urban Walker New York: Cambridge University Press, 2006, Xii + 250 Pp., $70.00, $27.99 Paper. [REVIEW] Dialogue 46 (04):819-.score: 90.0
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  8. Johan Brännmark (2008). Moral Repair: Reconstructing Moral Relations After Wrongdoing – by Margaret Urban Walker. Theoria 74 (2):169-172.score: 90.0
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  9. C. Bennett (2009). Review: Margaret Urban Walker: Moral Repair. [REVIEW] Mind 118 (469):215-220.score: 90.0
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  10. Cheshire Calhoun (2007). Moral Repair. Dialogue 46 (4):819-823.score: 90.0
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  11. Cheshire Calhoun (2007). Moral Repair: Reconstructing Moral Relations After Wrongdoing. Dialogue 46 (4):819-823.score: 90.0
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  12. Alexander Lucie-Smith (2012). Moral Repair: Reconstructing Moral Relations After Wrongdoing. By Margaret Urban Walker. Pp. Xii, 250, Cambridge University Press, 2006, $30.20. [REVIEW] Heythrop Journal 53 (5):845-845.score: 90.0
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  13. Lynne Tirrell (2013). Apologizing for Atrocity: Rwanda and Recognition. In Alice MacLachlan & C. Allen Speight (eds.), Justice, Responsibility, and Reconciliation in the Wake of Conflict. Springer.score: 90.0
    Apology is a necessary component of moral repair of damage done by wrongs against the person. Analyzing the role of apology in the aftermath of atrocity, with a focus on the genocide of the Tutsi in Rwanda, 1994, this article emphasizes the role of recognition failures in grave moral wrongs, the importance of speech acts that offer recognition, and building mutuality through recognition as a route to reconciliation. Understanding the US role in the international failure to stop (...)
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  14. Brad Wilburn (2007). Review of Margaret Urban Walker, Moral Repair: Reconstructing Moral Relations After Wrongdoing. [REVIEW] Notre Dame Philosophical Reviews 2007 (5).score: 90.0
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  15. Anca Gheaus (2008). Review of" Moral Repair. Reconstructing Moral Relations After Wrongdoing". [REVIEW] Essays in Philosophy 9 (2):10.score: 90.0
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  16. Mark J. Bliton & Richard M. Zaner (2001). Over the Cutting Edge: How Ethics Consultation Illuminates the Moral Complexity of Open-Uterine Fetal Repair of Spina Bifida and Patients' Decision Making. Journal of Clinical Ethics 12 (4):346.score: 72.0
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  17. Howard Mcgary (2010). Reconciliation and Reparations. Metaphilosophy 41 (4):546-562.score: 60.0
    Abstract: This article provides an account of the meaning of reparations and presents a brief explanation as to why African Americans believe they are entitled to reparations from the United States government. It then goes on to explain why reparations are necessary to address the distrust that is thought to exist between many African Americans and their government. Finally, it rejects the belief that reparations require reconciliation.
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  18. Elizabeth Peter & Joan Liaschenko (2013). Moral Distress Reexamined: A Feminist Interpretation of Nurses' Identities, Relationships, and Responsibilites. [REVIEW] Journal of Bioethical Inquiry 10 (3):337-345.score: 54.0
    Moral distress has been written about extensively in nursing and other fields. Often, however, it has not been used with much theoretical depth. This paper focuses on theorizing moral distress using feminist ethics, particularly the work of Margaret Urban Walker and Hilde Lindemann. Incorporating empirical findings, we argue that moral distress is the response to constraints experienced by nurses to their moral identities, responsibilities, and relationships. We recommend that health professionals get assistance in accounting for and (...)
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  19. Alice MacLachlan (2008). Forgiveness and Moral Solidarity. In Stephen Bloch-Shulman & David White (eds.), Forgiveness: Probing the Boundaries. Inter-Disciplinary Press.score: 48.0
    The categorical denial of third-party forgiveness represents an overly individualistic approach to moral repair. Such an approach fails to acknowledge the important roles played by witnesses, bystanders, beneficiaries, and others who stand in solidarity to the primary victim and perpetrator. In this paper, I argue that the prerogative to forgive or withhold forgiveness is not universal, but neither is it restricted to victims alone. Not only can we make moral sense of some third-party acts and utterances of (...)
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  20. David P. Hunt (2000). Moral Responsibility and Unavoidable Action. Philosophical Studies 97 (2):195-227.score: 42.0
    The principle of alternate possibilities (PAP), making the ability to do otherwise a necessary condition for moral responsibility, is supposed by Harry Frankfurt, John Fischer, and others to succumb to a peculiar kind of counterexample. The paper reviews the main problems with the counterexample that have surfaced over the years, and shows how most can be addressed within the terms of the current debate. But one problem seems ineliminable: because Frankfurt''s example relies on a counterfactual intervener to preclude alternatives (...)
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  21. Colleen Murphy (2010). A Moral Theory of Political Reconciliation. Cambridge University Press.score: 42.0
    Following extended periods of conflict or repression, political reconciliation is indispensable to the establishment or restoration of democratic relationships and critical to the pursuit of peacemaking globally. In this important new book, Colleen Murphy offers an innovative analysis of the moral problems plaguing political relationships under the strain of civil conflict and repression. Focusing on the unique moral damage that attends the deterioration of political relationships, Murphy identifies the precise kinds of repair and transformation that processes of (...)
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  22. Jules L. Coleman (1982). Moral Theories of Torts: Their Scope and Limits: Part I. [REVIEW] Law and Philosophy 1 (3):371 - 390.score: 42.0
    One approach to legal theory is to provide some sort of rational reconstruction of all or of a large body of the common law. For philosophers of law this has usually meant trying to rationalize a body of law under one or another principle of justice. This paper explores the efforts of the leading tort theorists to provide a moral basis — for the law of torts. The paper is divided into two parts. In the first part I consider (...)
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  23. Jules L. Coleman (1983). Moral Theories of Torts: Their Scope and Limits: Part II. [REVIEW] Law and Philosophy 2 (1):5 - 36.score: 42.0
    One approach to legal theory is to provide some sort of rational reconstruction of all or of a large body of the common law. For philosophers of law this has usually meant trying to rationalize a body of law under one or another principle of justice. This paper explores the efforts of the leading tort theorists to provide a moral basis - in the sense of rational reconstruction based on alleged moral principles - for the law of torts. (...)
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  24. Terry E. Hill (2010). How Clinicians Make (or Avoid) Moral Judgments of Patients: Implications of the Evidence for Relationships and Research. [REVIEW] Philosophy, Ethics, and Humanities in Medicine 5 (1):11.score: 42.0
    Physicians, nurses, and other clinicians readily acknowledge being troubled by encounters with patients who trigger moral judgments. For decades social scientists have noted that moral judgment of patients is pervasive, occurring not only in egregious and criminal cases but also in everyday situations in which appraisals of patients' social worth and culpability are routine. There is scant literature, however, on the actual prevalence and dynamics of moral judgment in healthcare. The indirect evidence available suggests that moral (...)
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  25. John Dienhart (2009). Principles of Managerial Moral Responsibility. Business Ethics Quarterly 19 (4):529-552.score: 42.0
    The purpose of this paper is to formulate and defend a set of moral principles applicable to management. Our motivation is twofold: 1) to increase the coherence and utility of Integrative Social Contracts Theory (ISCT); and 2) to initiate an alternative stream of business ethics research. To those ends, we specify what counts as adequate guidance in navigating the ethical terrain of business. In doing so, a key element of ISCT, Substantive Hypernorms, is found to be flawed beyond (...). So we propose and defend a remedy: prima facie moral principles. After delineating the appropriate criteria and format for such principles, we formulate, explain, and defend five of them. We conclude with a brief comment on future research possibilities. (shrink)
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  26. Alice MacLachlan (2010). Unreasonable Resentments. Journal of Social Philosophy 41 (4):422-441.score: 36.0
    How ought we to evaluate and respond to expressions of anger and resentment? Can philosophical analysis of resentment as the emotional expression of a moral claim help us to distinguish which resentments ought to be taken seriously? Philosophers have tended to focus on what I call ‘reasonable’ resentments, presenting a technical, narrow account that limits resentment to the expression of recognizable moral claims. In the following paper, I defend three claims about the ethics and politics of resentment. First, (...)
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  27. Mark Navin (2014). Local Food and International Ethics. Journal of Agricultural and Environmental Ethics 27 (3):349-368.score: 36.0
    Many advocate practices of ‘local food’ or ‘locavorism’ as a partial solution to the injustices and unsustainability of contemporary food systems. I think that there is much to be said in favor of local food movements, but these virtues are insufficient to immunize locavorism from criticism. In particular, three duties of international ethics—beneficence, repair and fairness—may provide reasons for constraining the developed world’s permissible pursuit of local food. A complete account of why (and how) the fulfillment of these duties (...)
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  28. Chairperson Iveta Radicova & Michael Rustin (1996). Repairing the Moral Deficits of Capitalism: The Role of the Nonprofit Sector. The European Legacy 1 (2):595-600.score: 32.0
    (1996). Repairing the moral deficits of capitalism: The role of the nonprofit sector. The European Legacy: Vol. 1, Fourth International Conference of the International Society for the study of European Ideas, pp. 595-600.
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  29. Anita L. Allen (2011). Was I Entitled or Should I Apologize? Affirmative Action Going Forward. Journal of Ethics 15 (3):253-263.score: 30.0
    As a U.S. civil rights policy, affirmative action commonly denotes race-conscious and result-oriented efforts by private and public officials to correct the unequal distribution of economic opportunity and education attributed to slavery, segregation, poverty and racism. Opponents argue that affirmative action (1) violates ideals of color-blind public policies, offending moral principles of fairness and constitutional principles of equality and due process; (2) has proven to be socially and politically divisive; (3) has not made things better; (4) mainly benefits middle-class, (...)
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  30. Rutger Claassen & Marcus Düwell (2013). The Foundations of Capability Theory: Comparing Nussbaum and Gewirth. [REVIEW] Ethical Theory and Moral Practice 16 (3):493-510.score: 30.0
    This paper is written from a perspective that is sympathetic to the basic idea of the capability approach. Our aim is to compare Martha Nussbaum’s capability theory of justice with Alan Gewirth’s moral theory, on two points: the selection and the justification of a list of central capabilities. On both counts, we contend that Nussbaum’s theory suffers from flaws that Gewirth’s theory may help to remedy. First, we argue that her notion of a (dignified) human life cannot fulfill the (...)
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  31. Nigel Biggar (2002). Peace and Justice: A Limited Reconciliation. [REVIEW] Ethical Theory and Moral Practice 5 (2):167-179.score: 30.0
    This paper aims to relax the tension between the political requirements of making peace and the moral demands of doing justice, in light of the peace processes in South Africa and Northern Ireland. It begins by arguing that criminal justice should be reconceived as consisting primarily in the vindication of victims, both direct and indirect. This is not to deny the retributive punishment of perpetrators any role at all, only to insist that it be largely subservient to the goal (...)
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  32. Kenneth D. Butterfield (2010). Extending the Horizon of Business Ethics. Business Ethics Quarterly 20 (3):453-480.score: 30.0
    We call for business ethics scholars to focus more attention on how individuals and organizations respond in the aftermath of unethical behavior. Insight into this issue is drawn from restorative justice, which moves beyond traditional approaches that emphasize retribution or rehabilitation to include restoring victims and other affected parties, reintegrating offenders, and facilitating moral repair in the workplace. We review relevant theoretical and empirical work in restorative justice and develop a conceptual model that highlights how this perspective can (...)
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  33. Jerry Goodstein & Kenneth D. Butterfield (2010). Extending the Horizon of Business Ethics. Business Ethics Quarterly 20 (3):453-480.score: 30.0
    We call for business ethics scholars to focus more attention on how individuals and organizations respond in the aftermath of unethical behavior. Insight into this issue is drawn from restorative justice, which moves beyond traditional approaches that emphasize retribution or rehabilitation to include restoring victims and other affected parties, reintegrating offenders, and facilitating moral repair in the workplace. We review relevant theoretical and empirical work in restorative justice and develop a conceptual model that highlights how this perspective can (...)
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  34. Jean Maria Arrigo (2004). A Utilitarian Argument Against Torture Interrogation of Terrorists. Science and Engineering Ethics 10 (3):543-572.score: 24.0
    Following the September 2001 terrorist attacks on the United States, much support for torture interrogation of terrorists has emerged in the public forum, largely based on the “ticking bomb” scenario. Although deontological and virtue ethics provide incisive arguments against torture, they do not speak directly to scientists and government officials responsible for national security in a utilitarian framework. Drawing from criminology, organizational theory, social psychology, the historical record, and my interviews with military professionals, I assess the potential of an official (...)
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  35. Alison Bailey (2011). On White Shame and Vulnerabiltiy. South African Journal of Philosophy 30 (3):472-483.score: 24.0
    In this paper I address a tension in Samantha Vice’s claim that humility and silence offer effective moral responses to white shame in the wake of South African apartheid. Vice describes these twin virtues using inward-turning language of moral self-repair, but she also acknowledges that this ‘personal, inward directed project’ has relational dimensions. Her failure to explore the relational strand, however, leaves her description of white shame sounding solitary and penitent. -/- My response develops the missing relational (...)
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  36. Richard M. Doerflinger (1999). The Ethics of Funding Embryonic Stem Cell Research: A Catholic Viewpoint. Kennedy Institute of Ethics Journal 9 (2):137-150.score: 24.0
    : Stem cell research that requires the destruction of human embryos is incompatible with Catholic moral principles, and with any ethic that gives serious weight to the moral status of the human embryo. Moreover, because there are promising and morally acceptable alternative approaches to the repair and regeneration of human tissues, and because treatments that rely on destruction of human embryos would be morally offensive to many patients, embryonic stem cell research may play a far less significant (...)
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  37. Richard J. Arneson (1997). Egalitarianism and the Undeserving Poor. Journal of Political Philosophy 5 (4):327–350.score: 24.0
    Recently in the U.S. a near-consensus has formed around the idea that it would be desirable to "end welfare as we know it," in the words of President Bill Clinton.1 In this context, the term "welfare" does not refer to the entire panoply of welfare state provision including government sponsored old age pensions, government provided medical care for the elderly, unemployment benefits for workers who have lost their jobs without being fired for cause, or aid to the disabled. "Welfare" in (...)
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  38. Kathryn J. Norlock (2009). Forgivingness, Pessimism, and Environmental Citizenship. Journal of Agricultural and Environmental Ethics 22 (6):29-42.score: 24.0
    Our attitudes toward human culpability for environmental problems have moral and emotional import, influencing our basic capacities for believing cooperative action and environmental repair are even possible. In this paper, I suggest that having the virtue of forgivingness as a response to environmental harm is generally good for moral character, preserving us from morally risky varieties of pessimism and despair. I define forgivingness as a forward-looking disposition based on Robin Dillon’s conception of preservative forgiveness, a preparation to (...)
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  39. Karen L. McGavock (2007). Agents of Reform?: Children's Literature and Philosophy. Philosophia 35 (2):129-143.score: 24.0
    Children’s literature was first published in the eighteenth century at a time when the philosophical ideas of Jean-Jacques Rousseau on education and childhood were being discussed. Ironically, however, the first generation of children’s literature (by Maria Edgeworth et al) was incongruous with Rousseau’s ideas since the works were didactic, constraining and demanded passive acceptance from their readers. This instigated a deficit or reductionist model to represent childhood and children’s literature as simple and uncomplicated and led to children’s literature being overlooked (...)
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  40. Nhung T. Nguyen & Michael D. Biderman (2008). Studying Ethical Judgments and Behavioral Intentions Using Structural Equations: Evidence From the Multidimensional Ethics Scale. [REVIEW] Journal of Business Ethics 83 (4):627 - 640.score: 24.0
    The linkage between ethical judgment and ethical behavioral intention was investigated. The Multidimensional Ethics Scale (MES) was used to measure ethical judgment ratings of hypothetical behaviors in retail, sales, and automobile repair scenarios. Confirmatory factor analysis on a sample of 300 undergraduate business students showed that a model with three latent variables representing three correlated ethical dimensions of moral equity, relativism, and contractualism, three correlated scenario latent variables, and correlated residuals presented a good fit to the data. Further, (...)
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  41. G. J. Boer (1999). Ethical Issues in Neurografting of Human Embryonic Cells. Theoretical Medicine and Bioethics 20 (5):461-475.score: 24.0
    During the last decade neurotransplantation has developed into a technique with the possible potential to repair damaged or degenerating human brain. Effective neurotransplantation has so far been based on the use of fetal brain tissue derived from aborted embryos or fetuses. The ethical issues related to this new therapeutic approach therefore not only concern the possible adverse side effects for a neural graft-receiving patient, but also the relationship between the requirements for fetal tissue and the decision-making process for induced (...)
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  42. Laurie Zoloth, Leilah Backhus & Teresa Woodruff (2008). Waiting to Be Born: The Ethical Implications of the Generation of “Nuborn” and “Nuage” Mice From Pre-Pubertal Ovarian Tissue. American Journal of Bioethics 8 (6):21 – 29.score: 24.0
    Oncofertility is one of the 9 NIH Roadmap Initiatives, federal grants intended to explore previously intractable questions, and it describes a new field that exists in the liminal space between cancer treatment and its sequelae, IVF clinics and their yearning, and basic research in cell growth, biomaterials, and reproductive science and its tempting promises. Cancer diagnoses, which were once thought universally fatal, now often entail management of a chronic disease. Yet the therapies are rigorous, must start immediately, and in many (...)
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  43. Antonio Argandoña (1995). Ethical Aspects of an Urban Catastrophe. Journal of Business Ethics 14 (7):511 - 530.score: 24.0
    As a consequence of the collapse of a building in Barcelona, in December 1990, it was discovered that a large number of dwellings, mainly in Barcelona but also in other towns of Catalonia, were affected by a structural defect known as aluminosis, consisting of a deterioration of the reinforced concrete manufactured using aluminous cement, which considerably reduced its strength and that of the steel embedded in the concrete. This brought to light a series of economic, social, political and also (...) problems, such as the use of the aluminous cement itself — a quality product but which requires careful handling —, the lack of regulation concerning the product and its use in construction, the poor state of repair of the buildings affected, the careless manner in which they had been built, the lag in technical knowledge, the financial situation of the people affected by the aluminosis, etc.This document provides a full account of the events and their historical, technical, economic and legal background, paying particular attention to the ethical problems created by the situation. (shrink)
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  44. W. Gregory Lycan (1969). Hare, Singer and Gewirth on Universalizability. Philosophical Quarterly 19 (75):135-144.score: 24.0
    This paper compares the attempts of hare, Singer and gewirth to provide the trivially true universalizability principle with normative content. The programs of hare and singer share an inability to convict the sincere fanatic ( the servant of an immoral but aesthetically compelling ideal) of moral inconsistency. Gewirth avoids the "fanatic" pitfall by adding some purely logical footwork; but his system too admits of important indeterminacies which may or may not prove fatal, E.G., The handling of morally tolerable coercion (...)
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  45. Paul Dunn & Jill Brown (2009). The Importance of Competency, Reputation, and Goodwill in Re-Establishing Stakeholder Relationships. Proceedings of the International Association for Business and Society 20:291-295.score: 24.0
    This paper provides a model on repairing re-establishing stakeholder relationships after a firm engages in a moral indiscretion. Depending upon their nature, indiscretions can be classified as mistakes, misconduct, or improprieties. After committing an indiscretion, firms can attempt to reestablish positive stakeholder relationships by strengthening their technical competency (for mistakes), improving their reputation (for misconduct), and enhancing their goodwill with relevant stakeholders (for improprieties). However, a firm’s cultural orientation may result in the misapplication of the stakeholder repair mechanism (...)
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  46. Simon Blackburn (2001). Being Good: An Introduction to Ethics. Oxford University Press.score: 24.0
    From political scandals at the highest levels to inflated repair bills at the local garage, we are seemingly surrounded with unethical behavior, so why should we behave any differently? Why should we go through life anchored down by rules no one else seems to follow? Writing with wit and elegance, Simon Blackburn tackles such questions in this lively look at ethics, highlighting the complications and doubts and troubling issues that spring from the very simple question of how we ought (...)
     
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  47. Iveta Radicova & Michael Rustin (1996). Repairing the Moral Deficits of Capitalism: The Role of the Nonprofit Sector. The European Legacy 1 (2):595-600.score: 24.0
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  48. E. Spelman (2004). The Household as Repair Shop. In Cheshire Calhoun (ed.), Setting the Moral Compass: Essays by Women Philosophers. Oxford University Press. 43--58.score: 24.0
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  49. Uri D. Leibowitz (2014). Explaining Moral Knowledge. Journal of Moral Philosophy 11 (1):35-56.score: 21.0
    In this paper I assess the viability of a particularist explanation of moral knowledge. First, I consider two arguments by Sean McKeever and Michael Ridge that purport to show that a generalist, principle-based explanation of practical wisdom—understood as the ability to acquire moral knowledge in a wide range of situations—is superior to a particularist, non-principle-based account. I contend that both arguments are unsuccessful. Then, I propose a particularist-friendly explanation of knowledge of particular moral facts. I argue that (...)
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  50. Nafsika Athanassoulis (2005). Common-Sense Virtue Ethics and Moral Luck. Ethical Theory and Moral Practice 8 (3):265 - 276.score: 21.0
    Moral luck poses a problem for out conception of responsibility because it highlights a tension between morality and lack of control. Michael Slote’s common-sense virtue ethics claims to avoid this problem. However there are a number of objections to this claim. Firstly, it is not clear that Slote fully appreciates the problem posed by moral luck. Secondly, Slote’s move from the moral to the ethical is problematic. Thirdly it is not clear why we should want to abandon (...)
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