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  1. Mordechai Gordon (2012). Exploring the Relationship Between Humor and Aesthetic Experience. Journal of Aesthetic Education 46 (1):111-121.
    The connection between humor and aesthetic experience has already been recognized by several thinkers and aesthetic educators. For instance, humor theorist John Morreall writes that "humor is best understood as itself a kind of aesthetic experience, equal in value at least to any other kind of aesthetic experience."1 For Morreall, both humor and aesthetic experience involve the use of the imagination, are accompanied by a sense of freedom, and often lead to surprises that we did not anticipate. Another theorist has (...)
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  2. Mordechai Gordon (2012). Friendship, Intimacy and Humor. Educational Philosophy and Theory 46 (2):1-13.
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  3. Mordechai Gordon & Cris Mayo (2012). Special Issue on Humor, Laughter, and Philosophy of Education: Introduction. Educational Philosophy and Theory 46 (2):1-5.
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  4. Andrea Kantrowitz, David Wong, Tyson E. Lewis, K. E. Gover, Sophie Bourgault, Azlan Iqbal, Emily Brady, Mordechai Gordon & Todd Parker (2012). 1. Front Matter Front Matter (Pp. I-Iii). Journal of Aesthetic Education 46 (1).
     
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  5. Mordechai Gordon (2011). Listening as Embracing the Other: Martin Buber's Philosophy of Dialogue. Educational Theory 61 (2):207-219.
    In this essay, Mordechai Gordon interprets Martin Buber's ideas on dialogue, presence, and especially his notion of embracing in an attempt to shed some light on Buber's understanding of listening. Gordon argues that in order to understand Buber's conception of listening, one needs to examine this concept in the context of his philosophy of dialogue. More specifically, his contention is that closely examining Buber's notion of embracing the other is critical to making sense of his conception of listening. Gordon's analysis (...)
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  6. Mordechai Gordon (2010). Learning to Laugh at Ourselves: Humor, Self-Transcendence, and the Cultivation of Moral Virtues. Educational Theory 60 (6):735-749.
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  7. Mordechai Gordon (2009). Toward A Pragmatic Discourse of Constructivism: Reflections on Lessons From Practice. Educational Studies 45 (1):39-58.
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  8. Mordechai Gordon (2007). Living the Questions: Rilke's Challenge to Our Quest for Certainty. Educational Theory 57 (1):37-52.
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  9. Mordechai Gordon (ed.) (2001). Hannah Arendt and Education: Renewing Our Common World. Westview Press.
    Renewing Our Common World: Essays On Hannah Arendt And Education is the first book to bring together a collection of essays on Hannah Arendt and education. The contributors contend that Arendt offers a unique perspective, one which enhances the liberal and critical traditions' call for transforming education so that it can foster the values of democratic citizenship and social justice. They focuses on a wide array of Arendtian concepts— such as natality, action, freedom, public space, authority and judgment— which are (...)
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  10. Mordechai Gordon (1999). Hannah Arendt on Authority: Conservatism in Education Reconsidered. Educational Theory 49 (2):161-180.
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  11. Mordechai Gordon (1998). John Dewey on Authority: A Radical Voice Within the Liberal Tradition. Educational Philosophy and Theory 30 (3):239–258.