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  1. Morgan Luck (2014). Incommensurability, Slight Pains and God. International Journal for Philosophy of Religion 75 (2):79-85.
    I will consider how the notion of incommensurability, as championed by Parfit (Reasons and persons, 1984), Griffin (Well-being: its meaning, measurement and importance, 1986), Chang (Ethics 112:659–688, 2002), and Hare (Philos Perspect 23:165–176, 2009), might affect both the argument from slight pain (which suggests God’s non-existence can be inferred from the merest stubbing of one’s toe) and Leibniz’s reply to this argument. I conclude that the notion of incommensurability may ultimately strengthen Leibniz’s general position.
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  2. Morgan Luck (2014). Robert A. Larmer, The Legitimacy of Miracles. International Journal for Philosophy of Religion 76 (2):235-240.
    This is a good book. It is good because: (a) it outlines well the central arguments of the debate (that is, the arguments relating to what a miracle is, whether they are possible, whether we can have evidence of their occurrence, and what would follow from such evidence were we to have it); (b) it furthers the debate; and (c) it is a clearly written. If you are a philosopher religion whose research area is miracles, the book is a must-read. (...)
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  3. Morgan Luck & Nathan Ellerby (2013). Has Bartel Resolved the Gamer's Dilemma? Ethics and Information Technology 15 (3):229-233.
    In this paper we consider whether Christopher Bartel has resolved the gamer’s dilemma. The gamer’s dilemma highlights a discrepancy in our moral judgements about the permissibility of performing certain actions in computer games. Many gamers have the intuition that virtual murder is permissible in computer games, whereas virtual paedophilia is not. Yet finding a relevant moral distinction to ground such intuitions can be difficult. Bartel suggests a relevant moral distinction may turn on the notion that virtual paedophilia harms women in (...)
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  4. Morgan Luck & Nathan Ellerby (2013). Should We Want God Not to Exist? Philo 15 (2):193-199.
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  5. Morgan Luck (2010). Conferring on Religion: Notes From the 2010 Australasian Philosophy of Religion Association Conference. Sophia 49 (4):521-521.
    Conferring on Religion: Notes from the 2010 Australasian Philosophy of Religion Association Conference Content Type Journal Article Pages 521-521 DOI 10.1007/s11841-010-0229-x Authors Morgan Luck, School of Humanities and Social Sciences, & The Centre for Applied Philosophy and Public Ethics, Charles Sturt University, Locked Bag 588, Wagga Wagga, NSW 2678, Australia Journal Sophia Online ISSN 1873-930X Print ISSN 0038-1527 Journal Volume Volume 49 Journal Issue Volume 49, Number 4.
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  6. Morgan Luck (2010). On Polkinghorne's Unification of General Providence, Special Providence and Miracle. Sophia 49 (4):577-589.
    John Polkinghorne claims there are no real distinctions between general providence, special providence and miracle. In this paper I determine whether this claim could be true given Polkinghorne’s wider account of these types of divine action. I conclude that this claim could be true, but only given a particular reading of Polkinghorne. I then defend this reading in light of two potential objections.
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  7. Daniel Cohen & Morgan Luck (2009). Why a Victim's Age is Irrelevant When Assessing the Wrongness of Killing. Journal of Applied Philosophy 26 (4):396-401.
    abstract Intuitively, all killings are equally wrong, no matter how old one's victim. In this paper we defend this claim — The Equal Wrongness of Killings Thesis — against a challenge presented by Kasper Lippert-Rasmussen. Lippert-Rasmussen shows The Equal Wrongness of Killings Thesis to be incompatible with two further theses: The Unequal Wrongness of Renderings Unconscious Thesis and The Equivalence Thesis. Lippert-Rasmussen argues that, of the three, The Equal Wrongness of Killings Thesis is the least defensible. He suggests that the (...)
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  8. Morgan Luck (2009). Aquinas's Miracles and the Luciferous Defence: The Problem of the Evil/Miracle Ratio. Sophia 48 (2):167-177.
    Miracles and the problem of evil are two prominent areas of research within philosophy of religion. On occasion these areas converge, with God’s goodness being brought into question by the claim that either there is a lack of miracles, or there are immoral miracles. In this paper I shall highlight a second manner in which miracles and the problem of evil relate. Namely, I shall give reason as to why what is considered to be miraculous may be dependent upon a (...)
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  9. Morgan Luck (2009). Crashing a Virtual Funeral: Morality in MMORPGs. Journal of Information, Communication and Ethics in Society 7 (4):280-285.
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  10. Morgan Luck (2009). The Gamer's Dilemma: An Analysis of the Arguments for the Moral Distinction Between Virtual Murder and Virtual Paedophilia. [REVIEW] Ethics and Information Technology 11 (1):31-36.
    Most people agree that murder is wrong. Yet, within computer games virtual murder scarcely raises an eyebrow. In one respect this is hardly surprising, as no one is actually murdered within a computer game. A virtual murder, some might argue, is no more unethical than taking a pawn in a game of chess. However, if no actual children are abused in acts of virtual paedophilia (life-like simulations of the actual practice), does that mean we should disregard these acts with the (...)
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  11. Nick Trakakis, Morgan Luck & Sarah Bachelard (2009). Introduction to Special Apra Issue. Sophia 48 (2):103-104.
  12. Morgan Luck (2008). Gareth Keenan Investigates Paraconsistent Logic : The Case of the Missing Tim and the Redundancy Paradox (UK). In Jeremy Wisnewski (ed.), The Office and Philosophy: Scenes From the Unexamined Life. Blackwell Pub..
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  13. Morgan Luck (2008). Paraconsistent Logic in The Office. The Philosophers' Magazine 42 (42):100-104.
    Normally, we would accuse anyone who holds inconsistent beliefs of irrationality. However, Keenan apologists may claim that in some circumstances it does seem perfectly rational to hold inconsistent beliefs. And we are not alone in this assertion. A small band of philosophers, led most notably by Graham Priest, have also championed this cause, the cause of paraconsistency.
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  14. Morgan Luck (2007). Supernatural Miracles and Religious Inclusiveness. Sophia 46 (3):287 - 293.
    In this paper I shall assess Clarke’s assertion that all definitions of miracles that purport to satisfy the criterion of religious inclusiveness should substitute the term ‘supernatural’ for ‘non-natural’. In addition, I shall attempt to strengthen Clarke’s conception of the supernatural by offering an analysis of what it means for something to be ‘above’ nature. Lastly, I shall offer a new argument as to why Clarke’s intention-based definition of miracles is necessarily less religiously inclusive than Mumford’s causation-based definition.
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  15. Morgan Luck (2005). Against the Possibility of Historical Evidence for Miracles. Sophia 44 (1):7 - 23.
    In his book The Concept of Miracle and his paper ‘For the Possibility of Miracles’ Swinburne claims that there are no logical difficulties in supposing that there could be strong historical evidence for the occurrence of miracles. This claim is based on three assertions; two of which I demonstrate are only true contingently. In this paper I identify several logical difficulties regarding the possibility of attaining historical evidence for the occurrence of miracles. On the strength of these logical difficulties I (...)
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  16. Morgan Luck (2003). In Defence of Mumford's Definition of a Miracle. Religious Studies 39 (4):465-469.
    In a recent paper in Religious Studies, Clarke criticizes Mumford's definition of a miracle as it fails to recognize a supernatural agent capable of intent. Clarke believes that in order for an event to qualify as a miracle a supernatural agent must intend it. It is my aim to dismiss this qualification and demonstrate how Mumford's intent-neutral definition is less problematic. I will do this by examining each of the three cases against Mumford's definition and give reason to (...)
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