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Katherine J. Morris [26]Kevin Morris [19]Katherine Morris [19]Kevin L. Morris [9]
K. J. Morris [6]Kathryn Morris [4]K. Morris [3]Kenneth E. Morris [1]

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Profile: Kevin Morris
Profile: Kevin Morris (Tulane University)
Profile: Katie Morris
Profile: Kelli-Ann Morris (University of Southern Queensland)
Profile: Kimberly Morris (Midwestern State University)
  1.  76
    Kevin Morris & Consuelo Preti (2015). How to Read Moore's "Proof of an External World". Journal for the History of Analytical Philosophy 4 (1).
    We develop a reading of Moore’s “Proof of an External World” that emphasizes the connections between this paper and Moore’s earlier concerns and strategies. Our reading has the benefit of explaining why the claims that Moore advances in “Proof of an External World” would have been of interest to him, and avoids attributing to him arguments that are either trivial or wildly unsuccessful. Part of the evidence for our view comes from unpublished drafts which, we believe, contain important clues concerning (...)
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  2.  20
    Kevin Morris (forthcoming). The Combination Problem: Subjects and Unity. Erkenntnis:1-18.
    Panpsychism has often been motivated on the grounds that any attempt to account for experience and consciousness in organisms in purely physical, nonexperiential terms faces severe difficulties. The “combination problem” charges that attributing phenomenal properties to the basic constituents of organisms, as panpsychism proposes, likewise fails to provide a satisfactory basis for experience in humans and other organisms. This paper evaluates a recent attempt to understand, and solve, the combination problem. This approach, due to Sam Coleman, is premised on a (...)
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  3.  7
    Kevin Morris (forthcoming). Physicalism, Truthmaking, and Levels of Reality: Prospects and Problems. Topoi:1-10.
    This paper considers the extent to which the notion of truthmaking can play a substantive role in defining physicalism. While a truthmaking-based approach to physicalism is prima facie attractive, there is some reason to doubt that truthmaking can do much work when it comes to understanding physicalism, and perhaps austere metaphysical frameworks in general. First, despite promising to dispense with higher-level properties and states, truthmaking appears to make little progress on issues concerning higher-level items and how they are related to (...)
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  4.  67
    Kevin Morris (2012). A Defense of Lucky Understanding. British Journal for the Philosophy of Science 63 (2):357-371.
    It is plausible to think that the epistemic benefit of having an explanation is understanding. My focus in this article is on the extent to which explanatory understanding, perhaps unlike knowledge, is compatible with certain forms of luck—the extent to which one can understand why something is the case when one is lucky to truly believe an explanatorily relevant proposition. I argue, contra Stephen Grimm ([2006]) and Duncan Pritchard ([2008], [2009]), that understanding quite generally is compatible with luckily believing a (...)
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  5.  42
    Kevin Morris (2010). Guidelines for Theorizing About Realization. Southern Journal of Philosophy 48 (4):393-416.
    Realization can be roughly understood as a kind of role-playing, a relationship between a property that plays a role and a property characterized by that role. This rough sketch previously received only moderate elaboration; recently, however, several substantive theories of realization have been proposed. But are there any general constraints on a theory of realization? What is a theory of realization supposed to accomplish? I first argue that a view of realization is viable, in part, to the extent that physical (...)
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  6.  56
    Kevin Morris (2011). Subset Realization, Parthood, and Causal Overdetermination. Pacific Philosophical Quarterly 92 (3):363-379.
    Defenders of the subset view of realization have claimed that we can resolve well-known worries about mental-physical causal overdetermination by holding that mental properties are subset realized by physical properties, that instances of subset realized properties are parts of physical realizers, and that part-whole overdetermination is unproblematic. I challenge the claim that the overdetermination generated by the subset view can be legitimated by appealing to more mundane part-whole overdetermination. I conclude that the subset view does not provide a unique solution (...)
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  7. Gordon Baker & Katherine Morris (1995). Descartes' Dualism. Routledge.
    Was Descartes a Cartesian Dualist? In this controversial study, Gordon Baker and Katherine J. Morris argue that, despite the general consensus within philosophy, Descartes was neither a proponent of dualism nor guilty of the many crimes of which he has been accused by twentieth century philosophers. In lively and engaging prose, Baker and Morris present a radical revision of the ways in which Descartes' work has been interpreted. Descartes emerges with both his historical importance assured and his philosophical importance redeemed.
     
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  8. Katherine Morris (2008). Sartre. Wiley-Blackwell.
    A novel introduction to Jean-Paul Sartre’s existentialist phenomenology. Draws parallels between Sartre’s work and the work of Wittgenstein Stresses continuities rather than conflict between Sartre and Merleau-Ponty, and between Sartre and post-structuralist/post-modernist thinkers, thus corroborating ‘new Sartre’ readings Exhibits the influence of Gestalt psychology in Sartre’s descriptions of the life-world Forms part of the _Blackwell Great Minds_ series, which outlines the views of the great western thinkers and captures the relevance of these figures to the way we think and live (...)
     
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  9.  35
    Kevin Morris (2014). Causal Closure, Causal Exclusion, and Supervenience Physicalism. Pacific Philosophical Quarterly 95 (1):72-86.
    This article considers the recent defense of the supervenience approach to physicalism due to Jaegwon Kim. Kim argues that supervenience supports physical causal closure, and that causal closure supports physicalism – indeed, a kind of reductive physicalism – and thus that supervenience suffices for physicalism. After laying out Kim's argument, I ask whether its success would truly vindicate the role of supervenience in defining physicalist positions. I argue that it would not, and that insofar as Kim's defense of supervenience physicalism (...)
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  10.  58
    Kevin Morris (2011). Theoretical Identities as Explanantia and Explananda. American Philosophical Quarterly 48 (4):373-385.
  11.  55
    Kevin Morris (2011). Subset Realization and Physical Identification. Canadian Journal of Philosophy 41 (2):317-335.
    According to a prominent line of thought, we can be physicalists, but not reductive physicalists, by holding that mental and other ‘higher-level’ or ‘nonbasic’ properties — properties that are not obviously physical properties — are all physically realized. Spelling this out requires an account of realization, an account of what it is for one property to realize another. And while several accounts of realization have been advanced in recent years,1 my interest here is in the ‘subset view,’ which has often (...)
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  12.  47
    Kevin Morris (2014). Supervenience Physicalism, Emergentism, and the Polluted Supervenience Base. Erkenntnis 79 (2):351-365.
    A prominent objection to supervenience physicalism is that a definition of physicalism in terms of supervenience allows for physicalism to be compatible with nonphysicalist outlooks, such as certain forms of emergentism. I take as my starting point a recent defense of supervenience physicalism from this objection. According to this line of thought, the subvenient base for emergent properties cannot be said to be purely physical; rather, it is “polluted” with emergent features in virtue of necessarily giving rise to them. Thus, (...)
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  13.  45
    Kevin Morris (2009). Does Functional Reduction Need Bridge Laws? A Response to Marras. British Journal for the Philosophy of Science 60 (3):647-657.
    In his recent article ‘Consciousness and Reduction’, Ausonio Marras argues that functional reduction must appeal to bridge laws and thus does not represent a genuine alternative to Nagelian reduction. In response, I first argue that even if functional reduction must use bridge laws, it still represents a genuine alternative to Nagelian reduction. Further, I argue that Marras does not succeed in showing that functional reduction must use bridge laws. Introduction Nagelian Reduction, Functional Reduction, and Bridge Laws Marras on Functional Reduction (...)
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  14.  47
    Kevin Morris (2013). On Two Arguments for Subset Inheritance. Philosophical Studies 163 (1):197-211.
    A physicalist holds, in part, that what properties are instantiated depends on what physical properties are instantiated; a physicalist thinks that mental properties, for example, are instantiated in virtue of the instantiation of physical “realizer” properties. One issue that arises in this context concerns the relationship between the “causal powers” of instances of physical properties and instances of dependent properties, properties that are instantiated in virtue of the instantiation of physical properties. After explaining the significance of this issue, I evaluate (...)
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  15. K. Morris (2007). Review: Wittgenstein: A Feminist Interpretation. [REVIEW] Mind 116 (464):1162-1165.
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  16.  24
    Kevin Morris (2015). Against Disanalogy-Style Responses to the Exclusion Problem. Philosophia 43 (2):435-453.
    This paper focuses on an influential line of response to the exclusion problem for nonreductive physicalism, one defended with the most subtlety by Karen Bennett. According to this line of thought, a successful nonreductive response to the exclusion problem, a response that allows one to maintain each of the core components of nonreductive physicalism, may consist in showing that the manner in which the effects of mental causes also have distinct and sufficient physical causes is disanalogous to other types of (...)
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  17. Katherine J. Morris (ed.) (2010). Sartre on the Body. Palgrave Macmillan.
     
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  18. Bill Fulford, Katherine Morris, John Z. Sadler & Giovanni Stanghellini (eds.) (2003). Nature and Narrative: An Introduction to the New Philosophy of Psychiatry. OUP Oxford.
    Nature and Narrative is the launch volume in a new series of books entitled International Perspectives in Philosophy and Psychiatry. The series will aim to build links between the sciences and humanities in psychiatry. Our ability to decipher mental disorders depends to a unique extent on both the sciences and the humanities. Science provides insight into the 'causes' of a problem, enabling us to formulate an 'explanation', and the humanities provide insight into its 'meanings' and helps with our 'understanding'. Psychiatry, (...)
     
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  19.  16
    Katherine J. Morris (2005). We're All Mad Here. Philosophy, Psychiatry, and Psychology 12 (4):331-333.
  20. Katherine Morris (2008). Sartre. Wiley-Blackwell.
    A novel introduction to Jean-Paul Sartre’s existentialist phenomenology. Draws parallels between Sartre’s work and the work of Wittgenstein Stresses continuities rather than conflict between Sartre and Merleau-Ponty, and between Sartre and post-structuralist/post-modernist thinkers, thus corroborating ‘new Sartre’ readings Exhibits the influence of Gestalt psychology in Sartre’s descriptions of the life-world Forms part of the _Blackwell Great Minds_ series, which outlines the views of the great western thinkers and captures the relevance of these figures to the way we think and live (...)
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  21.  33
    Katherine J. Morris (1988). Actions and the Body: Hornsby Vs. Sartre. Philosophy and Phenomenological Research 48 (3):473-488.
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  22.  61
    Katherine J. Morris (1984). In Defense of Methodological Solipsism: A Reply to Noonan. Philosophical Studies 45 (May):399-412.
    Noonan's arguments against methodological solipsism ("methodological solipsism," "philosophical studies" 4, 1981) assumes that mental states are individuated by (russellian) content; this assumption entails that narrowness and wideness are intrinsic to mental states. I propose an alternative "extrinsic" reading of methodological solipsism, According to which narrowness and wideness are modes of attribution of mental states, And thus reject the doctrine of individuation by russellian content. Noonan's arguments fail against this version of methodological solipsism.
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  23.  10
    Kevin L. Morris (1992). Chesterton's Conversion. The Chesterton Review 18 (3):371-383.
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  24.  9
    Kevin L. Morris (1987). Reflections on Chesterton's Zionism. The Chesterton Review 13 (2):163-176.
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  25.  9
    Kevin L. Morris (1994). G. K. Chesterton and the James Brothers. The Chesterton Review 20 (4):475-485.
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  26.  37
    Katherine J. Morris (1994). The `Context Principle' in the Later Wittgenstein. Philosophical Quarterly 44 (176):294-310.
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  27.  11
    G. P. Baker & K. J. Morris (1993). Descartes Unlocked. British Journal for the History of Philosophy 1 (1):5 – 27.
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  28.  22
    Edward J. McKenna, Gordon P. Baker, Katherine J. Morris, John Cottingham & Timothy Williamson (1994). Critical Notices. International Journal of Philosophical Studies 2 (1):109 – 144.
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  29.  16
    K. Morris (2014). Consciousness and the Limits of Objectivity: The Case for Subjective Physicalism. Philosophical Quarterly 64 (255):367-369.
  30.  15
    Katherine J. Morris (forthcoming). Anorexia: Beyond the Body Uncanny. Philosophy, Psychiatry, and Psychology 20 (1):97-98.
  31.  47
    Katherine Morris (1998). Sartre on the Existence of Others on `Treating Sartre Analytically'. Sartre Studies International 4 (1):46-62.
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  32.  48
    Gordon Baker & Katherine J. Morris (2004). The Meditations and the Logic of Testimony. British Journal for the History of Philosophy 12 (1):23 – 41.
  33.  7
    Kevin Morris (2014). The Exclusion Problem, Without the Exclusion Principle. Southwest Philosophy Review 30 (1):259-270.
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  34.  5
    Luc Foisneau, John Brooke, Katherine Morris, Desmond Clarke & John Stephens (1995). Review of Raison Et Déraison d'État. Théoriciens Et Theories de la Raison d'État aux XVIe Et XVIIe Siécles Sous la Direction de Yves Charles Zarka Paris, Presses Universitaires de France, 1994 Pp. 436, 248 FF. ISBN 9-782130-461616; Beverly C. Southgate: 'Covetous of Truth': The Life and Work of Thomas White, 1593-1676 Dordrecht: Kluwer Academic Publishers, 1993. 189 Pp. £60.00 ISBN 0-7923-1926-5; George Dicker: Descartes: An Analytical and Historical Introduction Oxford University Press, 1993 £14.95 Pbk. ISBN 0-19-507590-0; Theo Verbeek: Descartes and the Dutch: Early Reactions to Cartesian Philosophy, 1637-1650. Carbondale and Edwardsville, Southern Illinois University Press, 1992, X + 168 Pp. $30.00 ISBN 0-8093-1617-X; David Berman: George Berkeley: Idealism and the Man Oxford University Press, 1994. £27.50 ISBN 0-19-826746-0; Joseph Mali: The Rehabilitation of Myth: Vico's New Science Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 1992. Pp. Xv + 275. £35.00 ISBN 0-521-41952-2; R. C. Solomon. [REVIEW] British Journal for the History of Philosophy 3 (2):441-472.
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  35.  13
    John Abromeit, Mark W. Cobb, Lilian Alweiss, Susan J. Armstrong, Richard G. Botzler, Ronald Aronson, Robin Attfield, Gordon Baker, Katherine Morris & Etienne Balibar (unknown). The Following Books Have Been Received and Are Available for Review. Please Contact the Reviews Editor: Jim. Oshea@ Ucd. Ie. [REVIEW] International Journal of Philosophical Studies 12 (4):517 - 523.
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  36. K. W. M. Fulford, K. J. Morris, J. Z. Sadler & G. Stanghellini (2003). Past Improbable, Future Possible: The Renaissance in Philosophy and Psychiatry. Chapter 1 (P1-41). In Nature and Narrative: An Introduction to the New Philosophy of Psychiatry. Oxford University Press
  37. Katherine Morris (2007). Wittgenstein's Method : Ridding People of Philosophical Prejudices. In Guy Kahane, Edward Kanterian & Oskari Kuusela (eds.), Wittgenstein and His Interpreters: Essays in Memory of Gordon Baker. Blackwell Pub.
     
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  38. Katherine J. Morris (ed.) (2004). Wittgenstein's Method. John Wiley & Sons.
    This is a collection of the key articles written by renowned Wittgenstein scholar, G.P. Baker, on Wittgenstein’s later philosophy, published posthumously. Following Baker’s death in 2002, the volume has been edited by collaborator and partner, Katherine Morris. Contains articles previously only available in other languages, and one previously unpublished paper. Completely distinct from the widely-known work Baker did with P.M.S. Hacker in the _Analytical Commentary on the Philosophical Investigations_.
     
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  39.  23
    Katherine J. Morris (1996). Ambiguity and Bad Faith. American Catholic Philosophical Quarterly 70 (4):467-484.
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  40.  33
    Katherine J. Morris (1996). Pain, Injury, and First/Third-Person Asymmetry. Philosophy and Phenomenological Research 56 (1):125-56.
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  41.  25
    K. J. Morris (2009). There is No Such Thing as Social Science: In Defence of Peter Winch. Analysis 69 (4):795-797.
    This provocative, engaging and important book marks the fiftieth anniversary of the publication of Peter Winch's seminal The Idea of a Social Science . The authors – the first two philosophers, the third a sociologist – have worked together in various permutations before. No-one familiar with their previous publications will be surprised that the dominant voice throughout is Wittgenstein's – that is, Wittgenstein as read ‘resolutely’ by ‘new Wittgensteinians’. They have three principal aims: first, to read Winch's own work in (...)
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  42.  8
    Kevin L. Morris (1999). Fascism and British Catholic Writers. The Chesterton Review 25 (1/2):21-51.
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  43.  9
    Kevin Morris (2012). Derk Pereboom, Consciousness and the Prospects of Physicalism. Reviewed By. Philosophy in Review 32 (2):124-126.
  44.  9
    Kevin L. Morris (1985). Chesterton and Kenelm Henry Digby. The Chesterton Review 11 (3):332-337.
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  45.  19
    Katherine J. Morris (2003). Did You Hurt Yourself? Philosophy, Psychiatry, and Psychology 10 (1):23-24.
  46.  21
    Katherine J. Morris (2008). The Cambridge Companion to Merleau-Ponty - Edited by Taylor Carman and Mark B.N. Hansen. Philosophical Books 49 (1):57-59.
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  47.  16
    Steven Nadler, Gordon Baker & Katherine Morris (1997). Descartes's Dualism. Philosophical Books 38 (3):157-169.
  48.  16
    Katherine J. Morris (2009). Cartesian Reflections: Essays on Descartes's Philosophy. International Journal of Philosophical Studies 17 (5):753-758.
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  49. Kathryn Morris (2002). Rhonda Martens, Kepler's Philosophy and the New Astronomy Reviewed By. Philosophy in Review 22 (3):204-206.
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  50.  15
    Katherine J. Morris (2002). This Is Not Here. Philosophy, Psychiatry, and Psychology 9 (3):281-283.
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