Search results for 'Motivation (Psychology' (try it on Scholar)

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  1. E. L. Deci & R. M. Ryan (forthcoming). Intrinsic Motivation; Psychology; Personality. Philosophy.
     
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  2.  22
    Gordon H. Bower (ed.) (1984). The Psychology of Learning and Motivation. Academic Press.
    ... depends on understanding their origins and roles in the cogni- THE PSYCHOLOGY OF LEARNING Copyright © by Academic Press, Inc. AND MOTIVATION, VOL. ...
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  3. Glenn Lesses (1980). Desire and Motivation in Plato: Issues in the Psychology of the Early Dialogues and the "Republic". Dissertation, Indiana University
    Chapter VI is an extended sketch of Plato 's psychological theory found in the Republic, especially Book IV. Plato, unlike Socrates, distinguishes among three kinds of desire, corresponding to the three parts of the soul. Plato, however, still agrees with Socrates that all desires are belief-dependent. Furthermore, because Plato is much clearer than Socrates about the nature of goods, he is able to distinguish among three distinct kinds of beliefs about what is good. So Plato also agrees with Socrates that (...)
     
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  4.  37
    P. Gollwitzer & John A. Bargh (eds.) (1996). The Psychology of Action: Linking Cognition and Motivation to Behavior. Guilford.
    Moving beyond the traditional, and unproductive, rivalry between the fields of motivation and cognition, this book integrates the two domains to shed new light ...
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  5.  13
    Bernard Weiner (2005). Motivation From an Attribution Perspective and the Social Psychology of Perceived Competence. In Andrew J. Elliot & Carol S. Dweck (eds.), Handbook of Competence and Motivation. The Guilford Press 73--84.
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  6.  5
    H. I. Savastano (2006). Retraction of Savastano, Arcediano, Stout, and Miller (Quarterly Journal of Experimental Psychology, 2003) and Savastano & Miller (Learning and Motivation, 2003). [REVIEW] Journal of Experimental Psychology 56:371-395.
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  7.  6
    Edwin E. Gantt & Richard N. Williams (2014). Psychology and the Legacy of Newtonianism: Motivation, Intentionality, and the Ontological Gap. Journal of Theoretical and Philosophical Psychology 34 (2):83-100.
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  8.  5
    Alma Acevedo (forthcoming). A Personalistic Appraisal of Maslow’s Needs Theory of Motivation: From “Humanistic” Psychology to Integral Humanism. Journal of Business Ethics.
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  9.  40
    David J. Buller (1999). Defreuding Evolutionary Psychology: Adaptation and Human Motivation. In Valerie Gray Hardcastle (ed.), Where Biology Meets Philosophy. MIT Press 99--114.
  10.  13
    Mark Packer (1983). The Highest Good In Kant's Psychology of Motivation. Idealistic Studies 13 (2):110-119.
  11.  11
    Robert Thomson (1959). The Concept of Motivation. By R. S. Peters. (Studies in Philosophical Psychology. Ed. R. F. Holland: Routledge and Kegan Paul 1958. Pp. 166. Price 14s.). [REVIEW] Philosophy 34 (128):72-.
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  12. Hallvard J. Fossheim (2013). 5. The Prooimia, Types of Motivation, and Moral Psychology. In Christoph Horn (ed.), Platon: Gesetze/Nomoi. De Gruyter 87-104.
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  13. W. Mcd (1912). BARRETT, E. B. -Motive-Force and Motivation-Tracks: A Research in Will Psychology. [REVIEW] Mind 21:270.
     
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  14. Brian H. Ross (ed.) (2002). The Psychology of Learning and Motivation: Advances in Research and Theory, Vol. 41. Academic Press.
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  15.  51
    Alfred R. Mele (2003). Motivation and Agency. Oxford University Press.
    What place does motivation have in the lives of intelligent agents? Mele's answer is sensitive to the concerns of philosophers of mind and moral philosophers and informed by empirical work. He offers a distinctive, comprehensive, attractive view of human agency. This book stands boldly at the intersection of philosophy of mind, moral philosophy, and metaphysics.
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  16. Brendan Dill & Stephen Darwall (2014). Moral Psychology as Accountability. In Justin D'Arms Daniel Jacobson (ed.), Moral Psychology and Human Agency: Philosophical Essays on the Science of Ethics. Oxford University Press 40-83.
    Recent work in moral philosophy has emphasized the foundational role played by interpersonal accountability in the analysis of moral concepts such as moral right and wrong, moral obligation and duty, blameworthiness, and moral responsibility (Darwall 2006; 2013a; 2013b). Extending this framework to the field of moral psychology, we hypothesize that our moral attitudes, emotions, and motives are also best understood as based in accountability. Drawing on a large body of empirical evidence, we argue that the implicit aim of the central (...)
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  17.  77
    Stephen E. G. Lea & Paul Webley (2006). Money as Tool, Money as Drug: The Biological Psychology of a Strong Incentive. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 29 (2):161-209.
    Why are people interested in money? Specifically, what could be the biological basis for the extraordinary incentive and reinforcing power of money, which seems to be unique to the human species? We identify two ways in which a commodity which is of no biological significance in itself can become a strong motivator. The first is if it is used as a tool, and by a metaphorical extension this is often applied to money: it is used instrumentally, in order to obtain (...)
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  18.  51
    Paul Katsafanas (forthcoming). Philosophical Psychology as a Basis for Ethics. Journal of Nietzsche Studies 44 (2):297-314.
    Near the beginning of Beyond Good and Evil, Nietzsche writes that “psychology is once again the path to the fundamental problems” (BGE 23). This raises a number of questions. What are these “fundamental problems” that psychology helps us to answer? How exactly does psychology bear on philosophy? In this conference paper, I provide a partial answer to these questions by focusing upon the way in which psychology informs Nietzsche’s account of value. I argue that Nietzsche’s ethical theory is based upon (...)
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  19.  16
    Nancy E. Snow (2013). “May You Live in Interesting Times”: Moral Philosophy and Empirical Psychology. Journal of Moral Philosophy 10 (3):339-353.
    The Moral Psychology Handbook is a contribution to a relatively new genre of philosophical writing, the “handbook.” In the first section, I comment on an expectation about handbooks, namely that handbooks contain works representative of a field, and raise concerns about The Moral Psychology Handbook in this regard. In the rest of the article I comment in detail on two Handbook articles, “Moral Motivation” by Timothy Schroeder, Adina Roskies, and Shaun Nichols, and “Character” by Maria W. Merritt, John M. (...)
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  20.  99
    Wesley Buckwalter & John Turri (forthcoming). In the Thick of Moral Motivation. Review of Philosophy and Psychology:1-21.
    We accomplish three things in this paper. First, we provide evidence that the motivational internalism/externalism debate in moral psychology could be a false dichotomy born of ambiguity. Second, we provide further evidence for a crucial distinction between two different categories of belief in folk psychology: thick belief and thin belief. Third, we demonstrate how careful attention to deep features of folk psychology can help diagnose and defuse seemingly intractable philosophical disagreement in metaethics.
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  21. Rom Harré (1985). Motives and Mechanisms: An Introduction to the Psychology of Action. Methuen.
     
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  22.  35
    Christopher G. Framarin (2009). Desire and Motivation in Indian Philosophy. Routledge.
    They conclude that desireless action is action performed without certain desires; other desires are permissible.In this book, the author surveys the ...
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  23.  12
    Henning Jensen (1972). Motivation and the Moral Sense in Francis Hutcheson's Ethical Theory. The Hague,Nijhoff.
    INTRODUCTION HUTCHESONS LIFE AND WORKS The history of philosophy includes the names of many persons, famous in their time, whose contributions to human ...
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  24.  29
    Carolyn R. Morillo (1992). Reward Event Systems: Reconceptualizing the Explanatory Roles of Motivation, Desire and Pleasure. Philosophical Psychology 5 (1):7-32.
    A developing neurobiological/psychological theory of positive motivation gives a key causal role to reward events in the brain which can be directly activated by electrical stimulation (ESB). In its strongest form, this Reward Event Theory (RET) claims that all positive motivation, primary and learned, is functionally dependent on these reward events. Some of the empirical evidence is reviewed which either supports or challenges RET. The paper examines the implications of RET for the concepts of 'motivation', 'desire' and (...)
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  25.  69
    Joel Marks (ed.) (1986). The Ways of Desire: New Essays in Philosophical Psychology on the Concept of Wanting. Transaction Publishers.
    Collection of original essays on the theory of desire by Robert Audi, Annette Baier, Wayne Davis, Ronald de Sousa, Robert Gordon, O.H. Green, Joel Marks, Dennis Stampe, Mitchell Staude, Michael Stocker, and C.C.W. Taylor.
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  26. Myles I. Friedman (1991). The Psychology of Human Control: A General Theory of Purposeful Behavior. Praeger.
  27.  32
    Benedict Smith (2013). Depression and Motivation. Phenomenology and the Cognitive Sciences 12 (4):615-635.
    Among the characteristic features of depression is a diminishment in or lack of action and motivation. In this paper, I consider a dominant philosophical account which purports to explain this lack of action or motivation. This approach comes in different versions but a common theme is, I argue, an over reliance on psychologistic assumptions about action–explanation and the nature of motivation. As a corrective I consider an alternative view that gives a prominent place to the body in (...)
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  28.  69
    Charles R. Pigden (2007). Hume, Motivation and “the Moral Problem”. Rivista di Storia Della Filosofia 62 (3):199-221.
    Hume is widely regarded as the grandfather of emotivism and indeed of non-cognitivism in general. For the chief argument for emotivism - the Argument from Motivation - is derived from him. In my opinion Hume was not an emotivist or proto-emotivist but a moral realist in the modern ‘response-dependent’ style. But my interest in this paper is not the historical Hume but the Hume of legend since the legendary Hume is one of the most influential philosophers of the present (...)
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  29.  84
    Daniel F. Hartner (2014). From Desire to Subjective Value: On the Neural Mechanisms of Moral Motivation. Erasmus Journal for Philosophy and Economics 7 (1):1-26.
    Increasingly, empirically minded moral philosophers are using data from cognitive science and neuroscience to resolve some longstanding philosophical questions about moral motivation, such as whether moral beliefs require the presence of a desire to motivate. These empirical approaches are implicitly committed to the existence of folk psychological mental states like beliefs and desires. However, data from the neuroscience of decision-making, particularly cellular-level work in neuroeconomics, is now converging with data from cognitive and social neuroscience to explain the processes through (...)
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  30.  28
    Joseph P. Forgas, Kipling D. Williams & Simon M. Laham (eds.) (2004). Social Motivation: Conscious and Unconscious Processes. Cambridge University Press.
    Ground-breaking research by leading international researchers on the nature, functions and characteristics of social motivation.
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  31.  14
    Melvin J. Lerner, Michael Ross & Dale T. Miller (eds.) (2002). The Justice Motive in Everyday Life: Essays in Honor of Melvin J. Lerner. Cambridge University Press.
    This book contains new essays in honor of Melvin J. Lerner, a pioneer in the psychological study of justice. The contributors to this volume are internationally renowned scholars from psychology, business, and law. They examine the role of justice motivation in a wide variety of contexts, including workplace violence, affirmative action programs, helping or harming innocent victims and how people react to their own fate. Contributors explore fundamental issues such as whether people's interest in justice is motivated by self-interest (...)
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  32. Holly Lawford-Smith (2012). The Motivation Question: Arguments From Justice, and From Humanity. British Journal of Political Science 42:661-678.
    Which of the two dominant arguments for duties to alleviate global poverty, supposing their premises were generally accepted, would be more likely to produce their desired outcome? I take Pogge's argument for obligations grounded in principles of justice, a "contribution" argument, and Campbell's argument for obligations grounded in principles of humanity, an "assistance" argument, to be prototypical. Were people to accept the premises of Campbell's argument, how likely would they be to support governmental reform in policies for international aid, or (...)
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  33. John A. Bargh (ed.) (2007). Social Psychology and the Unconscious: The Automaticity of Higher Mental Processes. Psychology Press.
  34.  18
    Ian Ravenscroft (2003). Simulation, Collapse and Humean Motivation. In Jerome Dokic & Joelle Proust (eds.), Mind and Language. John Benjamins 162-174.
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  35.  21
    John P. O'Doherty Mimi Liljeholm (2012). Contributions of the Striatum to Learning, Motivation, and Performance: An Associative Account. Trends in Cognitive Sciences 16 (9):467.
  36.  32
    Benjamin B. Rubinstein (1980). On the Psychoanalytic Theory of Unconscious Motivation and the Problem of its Confirmation. Noûs 14 (September):427-442.
  37.  19
    K. Helmut Reich (1998). Psychology of Religion: What One Needs to Know. Zygon 33 (1):113-120.
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  38.  15
    Walter Cerf (1962). Studies in Philosophical Psychology. Philosophy and Phenomenological Research 22 (June):537-558.
  39. Bjorn Merker (2007). Consciousness Without a Cerbral Cortex: A Challenge for Neuroscience and Medicine. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 30 (1):63-81.
    A broad range of evidence regarding the functional organization of the vertebrate brain – spanning from comparative neurology to experimental psychology and neurophysiology to clinical data – is reviewed for its bearing on conceptions of the neural organization of consciousness. A novel principle relating target selection, action selection, and motivation to one another, as a means to optimize integration for action in real time, is introduced. With its help, the principal macrosystems of the vertebrate brain can be seen to (...)
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  40.  10
    Brian Garvey (2003). Darwinian Functions and Freudian Motivations. Biology and Philosophy 18 (3):427-444.
    Badcock, and Nesse and Lloyd, have argued that there are important points of agreement between Freud's theory of the mind and a theory of mind suggested by adaptive reasoning. Buller, on the other hand, draws attention to the need to avoid confusing an adaptive rationale with an unconscious motivation. The present paper attempts to indicate what role adaptive reasoning might have to play in justifying psychoanalytic claims. First, it is argued that psychoanalytic claims cannot be justified by the clinical (...)
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  41.  40
    Sergio Tenenbaum (2007). Appearances of the Good: An Essay on the Nature of Practical Reason. Cambridge University Press.
    'We desire all and only those things we conceive to be good; we avoid what we conceive to be bad.' This slogan was once the standard view of the relationship between desire or motivation and rational evaluation. Many critics have rejected this scholastic formula as either trivial or wrong. It appears to be trivial if we just define the good as 'what we want', and wrong if we consider apparent conflicts between what we seem to want and what we (...)
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  42.  14
    Frederic Schick (1991). Understanding Action: An Essay on Reasons. Cambridge University Press.
    This is an important new book about human motivation, about the reasons people have for their actions. What is distinctively new about it is its focus on how people see or understand their situations, options, and prospects. By taking account of people's understandings (along with their beliefs and desires), Professor Schick is able to expand the current theory of decision and action. The author provides a perspective on the topic by outlining its history. He defends his new theory against (...)
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  43.  10
    Lajos L. Brons (2016). Facing Death From a Safe Distance: Saṃvega and Moral Psychology. Journal of Buddhist Ethics 23:83-128.
    Saṃvega is a morally motivating state of shock that— according to Buddhaghosa—should be evoked by meditating on death. What kind of mental state it is exactly, and how it is morally motivating is unclear, however. This article presents a theory of saṃvega—what it is and how it works—based on recent insights in psychology. According to dual process theories there are two kinds of mental processes organized in two" systems" : the experiential, automatic system 1, and the rational, controlled system 2. (...)
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  44. Guy Kahane (2016). If Nothing Matters. Noûs 50 (2).
    The possibility that nothing really matters can cause much anxiety, but what would it mean for that to be true? Since it couldn’t be bad that nothing matters, fearing nihilism makes little sense. However, the consequences of belief in nihilism will be far more dramatic than often thought. Many metaethicists assume that even if nothing matters, we should, and would, go on more or less as before. But if nihilism is true in an unqualified way, it can’t be the case (...)
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  45.  11
    Hyemin Han (2015). Virtue Ethics, Positive Psychology, and a New Model of Science and Engineering Ethics Education. Science and Engineering Ethics 21 (2):441-460.
    This essay develops a new conceptual framework of science and engineering ethics education based on virtue ethics and positive psychology. Virtue ethicists and positive psychologists have argued that current rule-based moral philosophy, psychology, and education cannot effectively promote students’ moral motivation for actual moral behavior and may even lead to negative outcomes, such as moral schizophrenia. They have suggested that their own theoretical framework of virtue ethics and positive psychology can contribute to the effective promotion of motivation for (...)
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  46. Jonathan Dancy (1995). Why There Is Really No Such Thing as the Theory of Motivation. Proceedings of the Aristotelian Society 95:1-18.
    To the extent, then, that we set our face against admitting the truth of Humeanism in the theory of motivation, to that extent we are probably going to feel that there is no such thing as the theory of motivation, so conceived, at all. And that will be the position that this paper is trying to defend, though not only for this reason. It might seem miraculous that so much can be extracted from the little distinction with which (...)
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  47.  82
    Chrisoula Andreou (2007). Morality and Psychology. Philosophy Compass 2 (1):46–55.
    This article briefly discusses the connection between moral philosophy and moral psychology, and then explores three intriguing areas of inquiry that fall within the intersection of the two fields. The areas of inquiry considered focus on (1) debates concerning the nature of moral judgments and moral motivation; (2) debates concerning good and bad character traits and character-based explanations of actions; and (3) debates concerning the role of moral rules in guiding the morally wise agent.
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  48. Christine Clavien (2010). An Affective Approach to Moral Motivation. Journal of Cognitive Science 11 (2):129-160.
    Over the last few years, there has been a surge of work in a new field called “moral psychology”, which uses experimental methods to test the psychological processes underlying human moral activity. In this paper, I shall follow this line of approach with the aim of working out a model of how people form value judgements and how they are motivated to act morally. I call this model an “affective picture”: ‘picture’ because it remains strictly at the descriptive level and (...)
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  49.  76
    John Deigh (1996). The Sources of Moral Agency: Essays in Moral Psychology and Freudian Theory. Cambridge University Press.
    The essays in this collection are concerned with the psychology of moral agency. They focus on moral feelings and moral motivation, and seek to understand the operations and origins of these phenomena as rooted in the natural desires and emotions of human beings. An important feature of the essays, and one that distinguishes the book from most philosophical work in moral psychology, is the attention to the writings of Freud. Many of the essays draw on Freud's ideas about conscience (...)
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  50. Michael Lacewing (2009). The Psychology of Evil: A Contribution From Psychoanalysis. In Pedro Alexis Tabensky (ed.), The Positive Function of Evil. Palgrave Macmillan
    It has often been noted that evil – by which I mean evil in human motivation and action – is difficult to understand. We find it hard to make sense of what ‘drives’ a person to commit evil. This is not because we cannot recognise or identify with some aspect of the psychology of evil; we all experience feelings of envy, spite, cruelty, and hatred. But somehow this shared experience can seem insufficient, and we are left at a loss (...)
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