Search results for 'Motor Processes' (try it on Scholar)

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  1. Mark Wexler, Stephen M. Kosslyn & Alain Berthoz (1998). Motor Processes in Mental Rotation. Cognition 68 (1):77-94.score: 180.0
    Much indirect evidence supports the hypothesis that transformations of mental images are at least in part guided by motor processes, even in the case of images of abstract objects rather than of body parts. For example, rotation may be guided by processes that also prime one to see results of a specific motor action. We directly test the hypothesis by means of a dual-task paradigm in which subjects perform the Cooper-Shepard mental rotation task while executing an (...)
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  2. Richard A. Depue & Yu Fu (2013). On the Nature of Extraversion: Variation in Conditioned Contextual Activation of Dopamine-Facilitated Affective, Cognitive, and Motor Processes. Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 7.score: 162.0
  3. Joaquin A. Anguera, Kyle Lyman, Theodore P. Zanto, Jacob Bollinger & Adam Gazzaley (2013). Reconciling the Influence of Task-Set Switching and Motor Inhibition Processes on Stop Signal After-Effects. Frontiers in Psychology 4.score: 156.0
    Executive response functions can be affected by preceding events, even if they are no longer associated with the current task at hand. For example, studies utilizing the stop signal task have reported slower response times to ‘GO’ stimuli when the preceding trial involved the presentation of a ‘STOP’ signal. However, the neural mechanisms that underlie this behavioral after-effect are unclear. To address this, behavioral and electroencephalography (EEG) measures were examined in 18 young adults (18-30yrs) on 'GO' trials following a previously (...)
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  4. Marc Sato, Krystyna Grabski, Maëva Garnier, Lionel Granjon, Jean-Luc L. Schwartz & Noël Nguyen (2013). Converging Toward a Common Speech Code: Imitative and Perceptuo-Motor Recalibration Processes in Speech Production. Frontiers in Psychology 4:422.score: 156.0
    Auditory and somatosensory systems play a key role in speech motor control. In the act of speaking, segmental speech movements are programmed to reach phonemic sensory goals, which in turn are used to estimate actual sensory feedback in order to further control production. The adult's tendency to automatically imitate a number of acoustic-phonetic characteristics in another speaker's speech however suggests that speech production not only relies on the intended phonemic sensory goals and actual sensory feedback but also on the (...)
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  5. Noël Nguyen Marc Sato, Krystyna Grabski, Maëva Garnier, Lionel Granjon, Jean-Luc Schwartz (2013). Converging Toward a Common Speech Code: Imitative and Perceptuo-Motor Recalibration Processes in Speech Production. Frontiers in Psychology 4.score: 156.0
    Auditory and somatosensory systems play a key role in speech motor control. In the act of speaking, segmental speech movements are programmed to reach phonemic sensory goals, which in turn are used to estimate actual sensory feedback in order to further control production. The adult's tendency to automatically imitate a number of acoustic-phonetic characteristics in another speaker's speech however suggests that speech production not only relies on the intended phonemic sensory goals and actual sensory feedback but also on the (...)
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  6. J. Mark Baldwin (1909). Motor Processes and Mental Unity. Journal of Philosophy, Psychology and Scientific Methods 6 (7):182-185.score: 150.0
  7. Charles H. Judd (1909). Motor Processes and Consciousness. Journal of Philosophy, Psychology and Scientific Methods 6 (4):85-91.score: 150.0
  8. R. MasteRs, J. Poolton & J. Maxwell (2008). Stable Implicit Motor Processes Despite Aerobic Locomotor Fatigue. Consciousness and Cognition 17 (1):335-338.score: 150.0
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  9. William A. MacKay (1997). Synchronized Neuronal Oscillations and Their Role in Motor Processes. Trends in Cognitive Sciences 1 (5):176-183.score: 150.0
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  10. J. Mark Baldwin (1909). Motor Processes and Mental Unity. Journal of Philosophy, Psychology and Scientific Methods 6 (7):182-185.score: 150.0
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  11. Kent L. Norman (1974). Dynamic Processes in Stimulus Integration Theory: Effects of Feedback on Averaging of Motor Movements. Journal of Experimental Psychology 102 (3):399.score: 132.0
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  12. Laure Pisella & Yves Rosetti (2000). Interaction Between Conscious Identification and Non-Conscious Sensory-Motor Processing: Temporal Constraints. In Yves Rossetti & Antti Revonsuo (eds.), Beyond Dissociation: Interaction Between Dissociated Implicit and Explicit Processing. John Benjamins.score: 132.0
     
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  13. Rich S. W. Masters, Jon P. Maxwell & Frank F. Eves (2009). Marginally Perceptible Outcome Feedback, Motor Learning and Implicit Processes. Consciousness and Cognition 18 (3):639-645.score: 120.0
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  14. Cunnington Ross (2012). Disentangling Motor Control Processes in the Basal Ganglia Using High-Resolution fMRI in a 3T Scanner. Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 6.score: 120.0
  15. Michael Briese, Behrooz Esmaeili & David B. Sattelle (2005). Is Spinal Muscular Atrophy the Result of Defects in Motor Neuron Processes? Bioessays 27 (9):946-957.score: 120.0
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  16. Basar-Eroglu C. (2008). Dissociation of Motor and Cognitive Processes in Multistable Perception. Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 2.score: 120.0
  17. Karayanidis Frini (2012). Sustained Effects of Anodal tDCS Over the Dominant Motor Cortex on Response Preparation Processes. Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 6.score: 120.0
  18. Robert M. Kohl & Sebastiano A. Fisicaro (1996). Response Intention and Imagery Processes: Locus, Interaction, and Contribution to Motor Learning. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 19 (4):760.score: 120.0
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  19. Helen Johnson & Patrick Haggard (2005). Motor Awareness Without Perceptual Awareness. Neuropsychologia. Special Issue 43 (2):227-237.score: 114.0
    The control of action has traditionally been described as "automatic". In particular, movement control may occur without conscious awareness, in contrast to normal visual perception. Studies on rapid visuomotor adjustment of reaching movements following a target shift have played a large part in introducing such distinctions. We suggest that previous studies of the relation between motor performance and perceptual awareness have confounded two separate dissociations. These are: (a) the distinction between motoric and perceptual representations, and (b) an orthogonal distinction (...)
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  20. James A. Cheyne Douglas O. Cheyne, Paul Ferrari (2012). Intended Actions and Unexpected Outcomes: Automatic and Controlled Processing in a Rapid Motor Task. Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 6.score: 108.0
    Human action involves a combination of controlled and automatic behavior. These processes may interact in tasks requiring rapid response selection or inhibition, where temporal constraints preclude timely intervention by conscious, controlled processes over automatized prepotent responses. Such contexts tend to produce frequent errors, but also rapidly executed correct responses, both of which may sometimes be perceived as surprising, unintended, or “automatic”. In order to identify neural processes underlying these two aspects of cognitive control, we measured neuromagnetic brain (...)
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  21. Aymeric Guillot, Franck Di Rienzo, Tadhg MacIntyre, Aidan Moran & Christian Collet (2012). Imagining is Not Doing but Involves Specific Motor Commands: A Review of Experimental Data Related to Motor Inhibition. [REVIEW] Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 6.score: 102.0
    There is now compelling evidence that motor imagery (MI) and actual movement share common neural substrate. However, the question of how MI inhibits the transmission of motor commands into the efferent pathways in order to prevent any movement is largely unresolved. Similarly, little is known about the nature of the electromyographic activity that is apparent during MI. In addressing these gaps in the literature, the present paper argues that MI includes motor execution commands for muscle contractions which (...)
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  22. Christian Collet Aymeric Guillot, Franck Di Rienzo, Tadhg MacIntyre, Aidan Moran (2012). Imagining is Not Doing but Involves Specific Motor Commands: A Review of Experimental Data Related to Motor Inhibition. [REVIEW] Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 6.score: 102.0
    There is now compelling evidence that motor imagery (MI) and actual movement share common neural substrate. However, the question of how MI inhibits the transmission of motor commands into the efferent pathways in order to prevent any movement is largely unresolved. Similarly, little is known about the nature of the electromyographic activity that is apparent during MI. In addressing these gaps in the literature, the present paper argues that MI includes motor execution commands for muscle contractions which (...)
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  23. Bill Faw (2003). Pre-Frontal Executive Committee for Perception, Working Memory, Attention, Long-Term Memory, Motor Control, and Thinking: A Tutorial Review. Consciousness and Cognition 12 (1):83-139.score: 90.0
  24. Yves Rossetti (2001). Implicit Perception in Action: Short-Lived Motor Representation of Space. In Peter G. Grossenbacher (ed.), Finding Consciousness in the Brain: A Neurocognitive Approach. Advances in Consciousness Research. John Benjamins. 133-181.score: 90.0
  25. Abram M. Barch (1959). Replication Report: Work and Rest as Variables in Cyclical Motor Performance. Journal of Experimental Psychology 58 (5):415.score: 90.0
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  26. Ina McD Bilodeau & Edward A. Bilodeau (1954). Some Effects of Work Loading in a Repetitive Motor Task. Journal of Experimental Psychology 48 (6):455.score: 90.0
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  27. Armin Kibele (2006). Non-Consciously Controlled Decision Making for Fast Motor Reactions in Sports--A Priming Approach for Motor Responses to Non-Consciously Perceived Movement Features. Psychology of Sport and Exercise 7 (6):591-610.score: 90.0
  28. Flavio T. P. Oliveira & David Goodman (2004). Conscious and Effortful or Effortless and Automatic: A Practice/Performance Paradox in Motor Learning. Perceptual and Motor Skills 99 (1):315-324.score: 84.0
  29. Raffaella Ida Rumiati Barbara Tomasino (2013). At the Mercy of Strategies: The Role of Motor Representations in Language Understanding. Frontiers in Psychology 4.score: 84.0
    Classical cognitive theories hold that word representations in the brain are abstract and amodal, and are independent of the objects’ sensorimotor properties they refer to. An alternative hypothesis emphasises the importance of bodily processes in cognition: the representation of a concept appears to be crucially dependent upon perceptual-motor processes that relate to it. Thus, understanding action-related words would rely upon the same motor structures that also support the execution of the same actions. In this context, (...) simulation represents a key component. Our approach is to draw parallels between the literature on mental rotation and the literature on action verb/sentence processing. Here we will discuss recent studies on mental imagery, mental rotation, and language that clearly demonstrate how motor simulation is neither automatic nor necessary to language understanding. These studies have shown that motor representations can or cannot be activated depending on the type of strategy the participants adopt to perform tasks involving motor phrases. On the one hand, participants may imagine the movement with the body parts used to carry out the actions described by the verbs (i.e., motor strategy); on the other, individuals may solve the task without simulating the corresponding movements (i.e., visual strategy). While it is not surprising that the motor strategy is at work when participants process action-related verbs, it is however striking that sensorimotor activation has been reported also for imageable concrete words with no motor content, for “non-words” with regular phonology, for pseudo-verb stimuli, and also for negations. Based on the extant literature, we will argue that implicit motor imagery is not uniquely used when a body-related stimulus is encountered, and that it is not the type of stimulus that automatically triggers the motor simulation but the type of strategy. Finally, we will also comment on the view that sensorimotor activations ar. (shrink)
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  30. Brigitte Röder Thérèse Collins, Tobias Heed (2010). Visual Target Selection and Motor Planning Define Attentional Enhancement at Perceptual Processing Stages. Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 4.score: 84.0
    Extracting information from the visual field can be achieved by covertly orienting attention to different regions, or by making saccades to bring areas of interest onto the fovea. While much research has shown a link between covert attention and saccade preparation, the nature of that link remains a matter of dispute. Covert presaccadic orienting could result from target selection or from planning a motor act towards an object. We examined the contribution of visual target selection and motor preparation (...)
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  31. Markus Kiefer (2012). Executive Control Over Unconscious Cognition: Attentional Sensitization of Unconscious Information Processing. Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 6.score: 82.0
    Unconscious priming is a prototypical example of an automatic process, which is initiated without deliberate intention. Classical theories of automaticity assume that such unconscious automatic processes occur in a purely bottom-up driven fashion independent of attentional control mechanisms. In contrast to these classical theories, our attentional sensitization model of unconscious information processing proposes that unconscious processing is susceptible to attentional top-down control and is only elicited if the cognitive system is configured accordingly. It is assumed that unconscious processing depends (...)
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  32. M. Campbell (1936). The Cognitive Aspects of Motor Performances and Their Bearing on General Motor Ability. Journal of Experimental Psychology 19 (3):323.score: 78.0
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  33. Irwin P. Levin, John L. Craft & Kent L. Norman (1971). Averaging of Motor Movements: Tests of an Additive Model. Journal of Experimental Psychology 91 (2):287.score: 78.0
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  34. William A. Cunningham Marilee A. Martens, Adam E. Hasinski, Rebecca R. Andridge (2012). Continuous Cognitive Dynamics of the Evaluation of Trustworthiness in Williams Syndrome. Frontiers in Psychology 3.score: 72.0
    The decision to approach or avoid an unfamiliar person is based in part on one’s evaluation of facial expressions. Individuals with Williams syndrome (WS) are characterized in part by an excessive desire to approach people, but they display deficits in identifying facial emotional expressions. Likert-scale ratings are generally used to examine approachability ratings in WS, but these measures only capture an individual’s final approach/avoid decision. The present study expands on previous research by utilizing mouse-tracking methodology to visually display the nature (...)
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  35. Marilee A. Martens, Adam E. Hasinski, Rebecca R. Andridge & William A. Cunningham (2012). Continuous Cognitive Dynamics of the Evaluation of Trustworthiness in Williams Syndrome. Frontiers in Psychology 3.score: 72.0
    The decision to approach or avoid an unfamiliar person is based in part on one’s evaluation of facial expressions. Individuals with Williams syndrome (WS) are characterized in part by an excessive desire to approach people, but they display deficits in identifying facial emotional expressions. Likert-scale ratings are generally used to examine approachability ratings in WS, but these measures only capture an individual’s final approach/avoid decision. The present study expands on previous research by utilizing mouse-tracking methodology to visually display the nature (...)
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  36. Giovanni Mento (2013). The Passive CNV: Carving Out The Contribution Of Task-Related Processes From Expectancy. Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 7:827.score: 72.0
    In this perspective article, I summarized certain theoretical and methodological issues concerning the investigation of the contribution of cognitive and motor processes to the electrophysiological stimulus-preceding activity. In particular, the question of whether the contingent negative variation (CNV) is a marker reflecting both cognitive expectancy and motor preparation in the S1–S2 paradigms was discussed. New evidence suggests that it is possible to isolate an automatic temporal expectancy-related cognitive mechanism relying on a passive CNV after ruling out the (...)
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  37. K. Imanaka & Brad Abernethy (2000). Distance-Location Interference in Movement Reproduction: An Interaction Between Conscious and Unconscious Processing? In Yves Rossetti & Antti Revonsuo (eds.), Beyond Dissociation: Interaction Between Dissociated Implicit and Explicit Processing. John Benjamins.score: 72.0
  38. Rolf Verleger, Piotr Jaskowski, Aytaç Aydemir, Rob H. J. van der Lubbe & Margriet Groen (2004). Qualitative Differences Between Conscious and Nonconscious Processing? On Inverse Priming Induced by Masked Arrows. Journal of Experimental Psychology 133 (4):494-515.score: 70.0
  39. Natasha Postle, Roderick Ashton, Ken McFarland & Greig I. De Zubicaray (2013). No Specific Role for the Manual Motor System in Processing the Meanings of Words Related to the Hand. Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 7:11-11.score: 68.0
    The present study explored whether semantic and motor systems are functionally interwoven via the use of a dual-task paradigm. According to embodied language accounts that propose an automatic and necessary involvement of the motor system in conceptual processing, concurrent processing of hand-related information should interfere more with hand movements than processing of unrelated body-part (i.e., foot, mouth) information. Across three experiments, 100 right-handed participants performed left- or right-hand tapping movements while repeatedly reading action words related to different body-parts, (...)
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  40. David Moreau (forthcoming). Unreflective Actions? Complex Motor Skill Acquisition to Enhance Spatial Cognition. Phenomenology and the Cognitive Sciences:1-11.score: 66.0
    Cognitive science has recently moved toward action-integrated paradigms to account for some of its most remarkable findings. This novel approach has opened up new venues for the sport sciences. In particular, a large body of literature has investigated the relationship between complex motor practice and cognition, which in the sports domain has mostly concerned the effect of imagery and other forms of mental practice on motor skill acquisition and emotional control. Yet recent evidence indicates that this relationship is (...)
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  41. Francesca Garbarini & Lorenzo Pia (2013). Bimanual Coupling Paradigm as an Effective Tool to Investigate Productive Behaviors in Motor and Body Awareness Impairments. Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 7.score: 66.0
    When humans move simultaneously both hands strong coupling effects arise and neither of the two hands is able to perform independent actions. It has been suggested that such motor constraints are tightly linked to action representation rather than to movement execution. Hence, bimanual tasks can represent an ideal experimental tool to investigate internal motor representations in those neurological conditions in which the movement of one hand is impaired. Indeed, any effect on the ‘moving’ (healthy) hand would be caused (...)
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  42. Florian Lanz, Véronique Moret, Eric Michel Rouiller & Gérard Loquet (2013). Multisensory Integration in Non-Human Primates During a Sensory-Motor Task. Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 7.score: 66.0
    Daily our central nervous system receives inputs via several sensory modalities, processes them and integrates information in order to produce a suitable behaviour. The amazing part is that such a multisensory integration brings all information into a unified percept. An approach to start investigating this property is to show that perception is better and faster when multimodal stimuli are used as compared to unimodal stimuli. This forms the first part of the present study conducted in a non-human primate’s model (...)
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  43. Stefan Vogt, Franck Di Rienzo, Christian Collet, Allan Collins & Aymeric Guillot (2013). Multiple Roles of Motor Imagery During Action Observation. Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 7:807.score: 66.0
    Over the last 20 years, the topics of action observation (AO) and motor imagery (MI) have been largely studied in isolation from each other, despite the early integrative account by Jeannerod (1994, 2001). Recent neuroimaging studies demonstrate enhanced cortical activity when AO and MI are performed concurrently ('AO+MI'), compared to either AO or MI performed in isolation. These results indicate the potentially beneficial effects of AO+MI, and they also demonstrate that the underlying neurocognitive processes are partly shared. We (...)
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  44. Harriet Brown, Karl J. Friston & Sven Bestmann (2011). Active Inference, Attention, and Motor Preparation. Frontiers in Psychology 2:218.score: 66.0
    Perception is the foundation of cognition and is fundamental to our beliefs and consequent action planning. The Editorial (this issue) asks: “what mechanisms, if any, mediate between perceptual and cognitive processes?” It has recently been argued that attention might furnish such a mechanism. In this paper, we pursue the idea that action planning (motor preparation) is an attentional phenomenon directed towards kinaesthetic signals. This rests on a view of motor control as active inference, where predictions of proprioceptive (...)
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  45. Gert Pfurtscheller, Teodoro Solis Escalante, Robert J. Barry, Daniela Sabine Klobassa, Christa Neuper & Gernot Mueller-Putz (2013). Brisk Heart Rate and EEG Changes During Execution and Withholding of Cue-Paced Foot Motor Imagery. Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 7.score: 66.0
    Cue-paced motor imagery is a frequently used mental strategy to realize a Brain-Computer Interace (BCI). Recently it has been reported that 2 motor imagery tasks can be separated with a high accuracy within the first second after cue presentation onset. To investigate this phenomenon in detail we studied the dynamics of motor cortex beta oscillations in EEG and the changes in heart rate (HR) during visual cue-paced foot imagery using a go (execution of imagery) versus nogo (withholding (...)
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  46. Xing Tian & David Poeppel (2012). Mental Imagery of Speech: Linking Motor and Perceptual Systems Through Internal Simulation and Estimation. Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 6.score: 66.0
    The neural basis of mental imagery has been investigated by localizing the underlying neural networks, mostly in motor and perceptual systems, separately. However, how modality-specific representations are top-down induced and how the action and perception systems interact in the context of mental imagery is not well understood. Imagined speech production (‘articulation imagery’), which induces the kinesthetic feeling of articulator movement and its auditory consequences, provides a new angle because of the concurrent involvement of motor and perceptual systems. On (...)
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  47. Cinthia Maria Saucedo Marquez, Xue Zhang, Stephan Patrick Swinnen, Raf Meesen & Nicole Wenderoth (2013). Task-Specific Effect of Transcranial Direct Current Stimulation on Motor Learning. Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 7.score: 66.0
    Transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS) is a relatively new non-invasive brain stimulation technique that modulates neural processes. When applied to the human primary motor cortex (M1), tDCS has beneficial effects on motor skill learning and consolidation in healthy controls and in patients. However, it remains unclear whether tDCS improves motor learning in a general manner or whether these effects depend on which motor task is acquired. Here we compare whether the effect of tDCS differs when (...)
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  48. Kevin D'ostilio & Gaëtan Garraux (2012). Brain Mechanisms Underlying Automatic and Unconscious Control of Motor Action. Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 6.score: 66.0
    Are we in command of our motor acts? The popular belief holds that our conscious decisions are the direct causes of our actions. However, overwhelming evidence from neurosciences demonstrates that our actions are instead largely driven by brain processes that unfold outside of our consciousness. To study these brain processes, scientists have used a range of different functional brain imaging techniques and experimental protocols, such as subliminal priming. Here, we review recent advances in the field and propose (...)
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  49. Richard G. Carson Kathy L. Ruddy (2013). Neural Pathways Mediating Cross Education of Motor Function. Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 7.score: 66.0
    Cross education is the process whereby training of one limb gives rise to enhancements in the performance of the opposite, untrained limb. Despite interest in this phenomenon having been sustained for more than a century, a comprehensive explanation of the mediating neural mechanisms remains elusive. With new evidence emerging that cross education may have therapeutic utility, the need to provide a principled evidential basis upon which to design interventions becomes ever more pressing. Generally, mechanistic accounts of cross education align with (...)
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  50. Gaëtan Garraux Kevin D'Ostilio (2012). Brain Mechanisms Underlying Automatic and Unconscious Control of Motor Action. Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 6.score: 66.0
    Are we in command of our motor acts? The popular belief holds that our conscious decisions are the direct causes of our actions. However, overwhelming evidence from neurosciences demonstrates that our actions are instead largely driven by brain processes that unfold outside of our consciousness. To study these brain processes, scientists have used a range of different functional brain imaging techniques and experimental protocols, such as subliminal priming. Here, we review recent advances in the field and propose (...)
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