Search results for 'Motor Processes' (try it on Scholar)

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  1. Mark Wexler, Stephen M. Kosslyn & Alain Berthoz (1998). Motor Processes in Mental Rotation. Cognition 68 (1):77-94.score: 120.0
    Much indirect evidence supports the hypothesis that transformations of mental images are at least in part guided by motor processes, even in the case of images of abstract objects rather than of body parts. For example, rotation may be guided by processes that also prime one to see results of a specific motor action. We directly test the hypothesis by means of a dual-task paradigm in which subjects perform the Cooper-Shepard mental rotation task while executing an (...)
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  2. Joaquin A. Anguera, Kyle Lyman, Theodore P. Zanto, Jacob Bollinger & Adam Gazzaley (2013). Reconciling the Influence of Task-Set Switching and Motor Inhibition Processes on Stop Signal After-Effects. Frontiers in Psychology 4.score: 108.0
    Executive response functions can be affected by preceding events, even if they are no longer associated with the current task at hand. For example, studies utilizing the stop signal task have reported slower response times to ‘GO’ stimuli when the preceding trial involved the presentation of a ‘STOP’ signal. However, the neural mechanisms that underlie this behavioral after-effect are unclear. To address this, behavioral and electroencephalography (EEG) measures were examined in 18 young adults (18-30yrs) on 'GO' trials following a previously (...)
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  3. Noël Nguyen Marc Sato, Krystyna Grabski, Maëva Garnier, Lionel Granjon, Jean-Luc Schwartz (2013). Converging Toward a Common Speech Code: Imitative and Perceptuo-Motor Recalibration Processes in Speech Production. Frontiers in Psychology 4.score: 108.0
    Auditory and somatosensory systems play a key role in speech motor control. In the act of speaking, segmental speech movements are programmed to reach phonemic sensory goals, which in turn are used to estimate actual sensory feedback in order to further control production. The adult's tendency to automatically imitate a number of acoustic-phonetic characteristics in another speaker's speech however suggests that speech production not only relies on the intended phonemic sensory goals and actual sensory feedback but also on the (...)
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  4. Marc Sato, Krystyna Grabski, Maëva Garnier, Lionel Granjon, Jean-Luc L. Schwartz & Noël Nguyen (2013). Converging Toward a Common Speech Code: Imitative and Perceptuo-Motor Recalibration Processes in Speech Production. Frontiers in Psychology 4:422.score: 108.0
    Auditory and somatosensory systems play a key role in speech motor control. In the act of speaking, segmental speech movements are programmed to reach phonemic sensory goals, which in turn are used to estimate actual sensory feedback in order to further control production. The adult's tendency to automatically imitate a number of acoustic-phonetic characteristics in another speaker's speech however suggests that speech production not only relies on the intended phonemic sensory goals and actual sensory feedback but also on the (...)
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  5. Laure Pisella & Yves Rosetti (2000). Interaction Between Conscious Identification and Non-Conscious Sensory-Motor Processing: Temporal Constraints. In Yves Rossetti & Antti Revonsuo (eds.), Beyond Dissociation: Interaction Between Dissociated Implicit and Explicit Processing. John Benjamins.score: 104.0
     
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  6. Helen Johnson & Patrick Haggard (2005). Motor Awareness Without Perceptual Awareness. Neuropsychologia. Special Issue 43 (2):227-237.score: 102.0
    The control of action has traditionally been described as "automatic". In particular, movement control may occur without conscious awareness, in contrast to normal visual perception. Studies on rapid visuomotor adjustment of reaching movements following a target shift have played a large part in introducing such distinctions. We suggest that previous studies of the relation between motor performance and perceptual awareness have confounded two separate dissociations. These are: (a) the distinction between motoric and perceptual representations, and (b) an orthogonal distinction (...)
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  7. Richard A. Depue & Yu Fu (2013). On the Nature of Extraversion: Variation in Conditioned Contextual Activation of Dopamine-Facilitated Affective, Cognitive, and Motor Processes. Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 7.score: 102.0
  8. J. Mark Baldwin (1909). Motor Processes and Mental Unity. Journal of Philosophy, Psychology and Scientific Methods 6 (7):182-185.score: 90.0
  9. Charles H. Judd (1909). Motor Processes and Consciousness. Journal of Philosophy, Psychology and Scientific Methods 6 (4):85-91.score: 90.0
  10. R. MasteRs, J. Poolton & J. Maxwell (2008). Stable Implicit Motor Processes Despite Aerobic Locomotor Fatigue. Consciousness and Cognition 17 (1):335-338.score: 90.0
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  11. J. Mark Baldwin (1909). Motor Processes and Mental Unity. Journal of Philosophy, Psychology and Scientific Methods 6 (7):182-185.score: 90.0
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  12. Aymeric Guillot, Franck Di Rienzo, Tadhg MacIntyre, Aidan Moran & Christian Collet (2012). Imagining is Not Doing but Involves Specific Motor Commands: A Review of Experimental Data Related to Motor Inhibition. [REVIEW] Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 6.score: 90.0
    There is now compelling evidence that motor imagery (MI) and actual movement share common neural substrate. However, the question of how MI inhibits the transmission of motor commands into the efferent pathways in order to prevent any movement is largely unresolved. Similarly, little is known about the nature of the electromyographic activity that is apparent during MI. In addressing these gaps in the literature, the present paper argues that MI includes motor execution commands for muscle contractions which (...)
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  13. William A. MacKay (1997). Synchronized Neuronal Oscillations and Their Role in Motor Processes. Trends in Cognitive Sciences 1 (5):176-183.score: 90.0
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  14. Christian Collet Aymeric Guillot, Franck Di Rienzo, Tadhg MacIntyre, Aidan Moran (2012). Imagining is Not Doing but Involves Specific Motor Commands: A Review of Experimental Data Related to Motor Inhibition. [REVIEW] Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 6.score: 90.0
    There is now compelling evidence that motor imagery (MI) and actual movement share common neural substrate. However, the question of how MI inhibits the transmission of motor commands into the efferent pathways in order to prevent any movement is largely unresolved. Similarly, little is known about the nature of the electromyographic activity that is apparent during MI. In addressing these gaps in the literature, the present paper argues that MI includes motor execution commands for muscle contractions which (...)
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  15. James A. Cheyne Douglas O. Cheyne, Paul Ferrari (2012). Intended Actions and Unexpected Outcomes: Automatic and Controlled Processing in a Rapid Motor Task. Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 6.score: 84.0
    Human action involves a combination of controlled and automatic behavior. These processes may interact in tasks requiring rapid response selection or inhibition, where temporal constraints preclude timely intervention by conscious, controlled processes over automatized prepotent responses. Such contexts tend to produce frequent errors, but also rapidly executed correct responses, both of which may sometimes be perceived as surprising, unintended, or “automatic”. In order to identify neural processes underlying these two aspects of cognitive control, we measured neuromagnetic brain (...)
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  16. Kent L. Norman (1974). Dynamic Processes in Stimulus Integration Theory: Effects of Feedback on Averaging of Motor Movements. Journal of Experimental Psychology 102 (3):399.score: 84.0
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  17. Bill Faw (2003). Pre-Frontal Executive Committee for Perception, Working Memory, Attention, Long-Term Memory, Motor Control, and Thinking: A Tutorial Review. Consciousness and Cognition 12 (1):83-139.score: 78.0
  18. Yves Rossetti (2001). Implicit Perception in Action: Short-Lived Motor Representation of Space. In Peter G. Grossenbacher (ed.), Finding Consciousness in the Brain: A Neurocognitive Approach. Advances in Consciousness Research. John Benjamins. 133-181.score: 78.0
  19. Abram M. Barch (1959). Replication Report: Work and Rest as Variables in Cyclical Motor Performance. Journal of Experimental Psychology 58 (5):415.score: 78.0
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  20. Ina McD Bilodeau & Edward A. Bilodeau (1954). Some Effects of Work Loading in a Repetitive Motor Task. Journal of Experimental Psychology 48 (6):455.score: 78.0
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  21. Armin Kibele (2006). Non-Consciously Controlled Decision Making for Fast Motor Reactions in Sports--A Priming Approach for Motor Responses to Non-Consciously Perceived Movement Features. Psychology of Sport and Exercise 7 (6):591-610.score: 78.0
  22. Markus Kiefer (2012). Executive Control Over Unconscious Cognition: Attentional Sensitization of Unconscious Information Processing. Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 6.score: 78.0
    Unconscious priming is a prototypical example of an automatic process, which is initiated without deliberate intention. Classical theories of automaticity assume that such unconscious automatic processes occur in a purely bottom-up driven fashion independent of attentional control mechanisms. In contrast to these classical theories, our attentional sensitization model of unconscious information processing proposes that unconscious processing is susceptible to attentional top-down control and is only elicited if the cognitive system is configured accordingly. It is assumed that unconscious processing depends (...)
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  23. Flavio T. P. Oliveira & David Goodman (2004). Conscious and Effortful or Effortless and Automatic: A Practice/Performance Paradox in Motor Learning. Perceptual and Motor Skills 99 (1):315-324.score: 72.0
  24. Rich S. W. Masters, Jon P. Maxwell & Frank F. Eves (2009). Marginally Perceptible Outcome Feedback, Motor Learning and Implicit Processes. Consciousness and Cognition 18 (3):639-645.score: 72.0
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  25. William A. Cunningham Marilee A. Martens, Adam E. Hasinski, Rebecca R. Andridge (2012). Continuous Cognitive Dynamics of the Evaluation of Trustworthiness in Williams Syndrome. Frontiers in Psychology 3.score: 72.0
    The decision to approach or avoid an unfamiliar person is based in part on one’s evaluation of facial expressions. Individuals with Williams syndrome (WS) are characterized in part by an excessive desire to approach people, but they display deficits in identifying facial emotional expressions. Likert-scale ratings are generally used to examine approachability ratings in WS, but these measures only capture an individual’s final approach/avoid decision. The present study expands on previous research by utilizing mouse-tracking methodology to visually display the nature (...)
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  26. Raffaella Ida Rumiati Barbara Tomasino (2013). At the Mercy of Strategies: The Role of Motor Representations in Language Understanding. Frontiers in Psychology 4.score: 72.0
    Classical cognitive theories hold that word representations in the brain are abstract and amodal, and are independent of the objects’ sensorimotor properties they refer to. An alternative hypothesis emphasises the importance of bodily processes in cognition: the representation of a concept appears to be crucially dependent upon perceptual-motor processes that relate to it. Thus, understanding action-related words would rely upon the same motor structures that also support the execution of the same actions. In this context, (...) simulation represents a key component. Our approach is to draw parallels between the literature on mental rotation and the literature on action verb/sentence processing. Here we will discuss recent studies on mental imagery, mental rotation, and language that clearly demonstrate how motor simulation is neither automatic nor necessary to language understanding. These studies have shown that motor representations can or cannot be activated depending on the type of strategy the participants adopt to perform tasks involving motor phrases. On the one hand, participants may imagine the movement with the body parts used to carry out the actions described by the verbs (i.e., motor strategy); on the other, individuals may solve the task without simulating the corresponding movements (i.e., visual strategy). While it is not surprising that the motor strategy is at work when participants process action-related verbs, it is however striking that sensorimotor activation has been reported also for imageable concrete words with no motor content, for “non-words” with regular phonology, for pseudo-verb stimuli, and also for negations. Based on the extant literature, we will argue that implicit motor imagery is not uniquely used when a body-related stimulus is encountered, and that it is not the type of stimulus that automatically triggers the motor simulation but the type of strategy. Finally, we will also comment on the view that sensorimotor activations ar. (shrink)
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  27. Marilee A. Martens, Adam E. Hasinski, Rebecca R. Andridge & William A. Cunningham (2012). Continuous Cognitive Dynamics of the Evaluation of Trustworthiness in Williams Syndrome. Frontiers in Psychology 3.score: 72.0
    The decision to approach or avoid an unfamiliar person is based in part on one’s evaluation of facial expressions. Individuals with Williams syndrome (WS) are characterized in part by an excessive desire to approach people, but they display deficits in identifying facial emotional expressions. Likert-scale ratings are generally used to examine approachability ratings in WS, but these measures only capture an individual’s final approach/avoid decision. The present study expands on previous research by utilizing mouse-tracking methodology to visually display the nature (...)
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  28. Michael Briese, Behrooz Esmaeili & David B. Sattelle (2005). Is Spinal Muscular Atrophy the Result of Defects in Motor Neuron Processes? Bioessays 27 (9):946-957.score: 72.0
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  29. Cunnington Ross (2012). Disentangling Motor Control Processes in the Basal Ganglia Using High-Resolution fMRI in a 3T Scanner. Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 6.score: 72.0
  30. Basar-Eroglu C. (2008). Dissociation of Motor and Cognitive Processes in Multistable Perception. Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 2.score: 72.0
  31. Karayanidis Frini (2012). Sustained Effects of Anodal tDCS Over the Dominant Motor Cortex on Response Preparation Processes. Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 6.score: 72.0
  32. Robert M. Kohl & Sebastiano A. Fisicaro (1996). Response Intention and Imagery Processes: Locus, Interaction, and Contribution to Motor Learning. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 19 (4):760.score: 72.0
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  33. K. Imanaka & Brad Abernethy (2000). Distance-Location Interference in Movement Reproduction: An Interaction Between Conscious and Unconscious Processing? In Yves Rossetti & Antti Revonsuo (eds.), Beyond Dissociation: Interaction Between Dissociated Implicit and Explicit Processing. John Benjamins.score: 68.0
  34. M. Campbell (1936). The Cognitive Aspects of Motor Performances and Their Bearing on General Motor Ability. Journal of Experimental Psychology 19 (3):323.score: 66.0
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  35. Irwin P. Levin, John L. Craft & Kent L. Norman (1971). Averaging of Motor Movements: Tests of an Additive Model. Journal of Experimental Psychology 91 (2):287.score: 66.0
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  36. Melvyn A. Goodale, Jonathan S. Cant & Grzegorz Króliczak (2006). Grasping the Past and Present: When Does Visuomotor Priming Occur? In Ögmen, Haluk; Breitmeyer, Bruno G. (2006). The First Half Second: The Microgenesis and Temporal Dynamics of Unconscious and Conscious Visual Processes. (Pp. 51-71). Cambridge, Ma, Us: Mit Press. Xi, 410 Pp.score: 66.0
  37. Jens Schwarzbach & Dirk Vorberg (2006). Response Priming with and Without Awareness. In Haluk Ögmen & Bruno G. Breitmeyer (eds.), The First Half Second: The Microgenesis and Temporal Dynamics of Unconscious and Conscious Visual Processes. Mit Press. 297-314.score: 66.0
     
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  38. Rolf Verleger, Piotr Jaskowski, Aytaç Aydemir, Rob H. J. van der Lubbe & Margriet Groen (2004). Qualitative Differences Between Conscious and Nonconscious Processing? On Inverse Priming Induced by Masked Arrows. Journal of Experimental Psychology 133 (4):494-515.score: 66.0
  39. R. P. Behrendt (2003). Hallucinations: Synchronisation of Thalamocortical ? Oscillations Underconstrained by Sensory Input. Consciousness and Cognition 12 (3):413-451.score: 62.0
    What we perceive is the product of an intrinsic process and not part of external physical reality. This notion is consistent with the philosophical position of transcendental idealism but also agrees with physiological findings on the thalamocortical system. -Frequency rhythms of discharge activity from thalamic and cortical neurons are facilitated by cholinergic arousal and resonate in thalamocortical networks, thereby transiently forming assemblies of coherent oscillations under constraints of sensory input and prefrontal attentional mechanisms. Perception and conscious experience may be based (...)
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  40. Daniel A. Pollen (2006). Brain Stimulation and Conscious Experience: Electrical Stimulation of the Cortical Surface at a Threshold Current Evokes Sustained Neuronal Activity Only After a Prolonged Latency. Consciousness and Cognition 15 (3):560-565.score: 62.0
    Libet demonstrated that a substantial duration (>0.5-1.0 s) of direct electrical stimulation of the surface of a sensory cortex at a threshold or liminal current is required before a subject can experience a percept. Libet and his co-workers originally proposed that the result could be due either to spatial and temporal facilitation of the underlying neurons or additionally to a prolonged central processing time. However, over the next four decades, Libet chose to attribute the prolonged latency for evoking conscious experience (...)
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  41. Stephen Jackson (2000). Perception, Awareness and Action: Insights From Blindsight. In Yves Rossetti & Antti Revonsuo (eds.), Beyond Dissociation: Interaction Between Dissociated Implicit and Explicit Processing. John Benjamins.score: 62.0
  42. Patrick Haggard, P. Catledge, M. Dafydd & David A. Oakley (2004). Anomalous Control: When "Free Will" is Not Conscious. Consciousness and Cognition 13 (3):646-654.score: 60.0
  43. Sarah-Jayne Blakemore & Chris Frith (2003). Self-Awareness and Action. Current Opinion in Neurobiology. Special Issue 13 (2):219-224.score: 60.0
  44. Christopher D. Frith, S. J. Blakemore & D. Wolpert (2000). Explaining the Symptoms of Schizophrenia: Abnormalities in the Awareness of Action. Brain Research Reviews 31 (2):357-363.score: 60.0
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  45. Bjorn H. Merker (2005). The Liabilities of Mobility: A Selection Pressure for the Transition to Consciousness in Animal Evolution. Consciousness and Cognition 14 (1):89-114.score: 60.0
  46. Carrie Figdor (2003). Can Mental Representations Be Triggering Causes? Consciousness and Emotion 4 (1):43-61.score: 60.0
    Fred Dretske?s (1988) account of the causal role of intentional mental states was widely criticized for missing the target: he explained why a type of intentional state causes the type of bodily motion it does rather than some other type, when what we wanted was an account of how the intentional properties of these states play a causal role in each singular causal relation with a token bodily motion. I argue that the non-reductive metaphysics that Dretske defends for his account (...)
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  47. David A. Oakley & Patrick Haggard (2006). The Timing of Brain Events: Authors' Response to Libet's 'Reply'. Consciousness and Cognition 15 (3):548-550.score: 60.0
  48. Sarah-Jayne Blakemore, Daniel M. Wolpert & Christopher D. Frith (2002). Abnormalities in the Awareness of Action. Trends in Cognitive Sciences 6 (6):237-242.score: 60.0
  49. G. Knoblich & T. T. J. Kircher (2004). Deceiving Oneself About Being in Control: Conscious Detection of Changes in Visuomotor Coupling. Journal of Experimental Psychology - Human Perception and Performance 30 (4):657-66.score: 60.0
  50. Shaun Gallagher (2006). Where's the Action? Epiphenomenalism and the Problem of Free Will. In Susan Pockett, William P. Banks & Shaun Gallagher (eds.), Does Consciousness Cause Behavior? MIT Press. 109-124.score: 60.0
    Some philosophers argue that Descartes was wrong when he characterized animals as purely physical automata – robots devoid of consciousness. It seems to them obvious that animals (tigers, lions, and bears, as well as chimps, dogs, and dolphins, and so forth) are conscious. There are other philosophers who argue that it is not beyond the realm of possibilities that robots and other artificial agents may someday be conscious – and it is certainly practical to take the intentional stance toward them (...)
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