Search results for 'Motor control' (try it on Scholar)

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  1. Todd C. Handy Julia W. Y. Kam, Elizabeth Dao, Patricia Blinn, Olav E. Krigolson, Lara A. Boyd (2012). Mind Wandering and Motor Control: Off-Task Thinking Disrupts the Online Adjustment of Behavior. Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 6.score: 234.0
    Mind wandering episodes have been construed as periods of "stimulus-independent" thought, where our minds are decoupled from the external sensory environment. In two experiments, we used behavioral and event-related potential (ERP) measures to determine whether mind wandering episodes can also be considered as periods of "response-independent" thought, with our minds disengaged from adjusting our behavioral outputs. In the first experiment, participants performed a motor tracking task and were occasionally prompted to report whether their attention was "on-task" or "mind wandering." (...)
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  2. Julia W. Y. Kam, Elizabeth Dao, Patricia Blinn, Olav E. Krigolson, Lara A. Boyd & Todd C. Handy (2012). Mind Wandering and Motor Control: Off-Task Thinking Disrupts the Online Adjustment of Behavior. Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 6.score: 234.0
    Mind wandering episodes have been construed as periods of "stimulus-independent" thought, where our minds are decoupled from the external sensory environment. In two experiments, we used behavioral and event-related potential (ERP) measures to determine whether mind wandering episodes can also be considered as periods of "response-independent" thought, with our minds disengaged from adjusting our behavioral outputs. In the first experiment, participants performed a motor tracking task and were occasionally prompted to report whether their attention was "on-task" or "mind wandering." (...)
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  3. John F. Mathers & Madeleine A. Grealy (2014). Motor Control Strategies and the Effects of Fatigue on Golf Putting Performance. Frontiers in Psychology 4.score: 210.0
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  4. M. B. Berkinblit, A. G. Feldman & O. I. Fukson (1986). Adaptability of Innate Motor Patterns and Motor Control Mechanisms. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 9 (4):585.score: 210.0
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  5. Kevin D'ostilio & Gaëtan Garraux (2012). Brain Mechanisms Underlying Automatic and Unconscious Control of Motor Action. Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 6.score: 210.0
    Are we in command of our motor acts? The popular belief holds that our conscious decisions are the direct causes of our actions. However, overwhelming evidence from neurosciences demonstrates that our actions are instead largely driven by brain processes that unfold outside of our consciousness. To study these brain processes, scientists have used a range of different functional brain imaging techniques and experimental protocols, such as subliminal priming. Here, we review recent advances in the field and propose a theoretical (...)
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  6. Gaëtan Garraux Kevin D'Ostilio (2012). Brain Mechanisms Underlying Automatic and Unconscious Control of Motor Action. Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 6.score: 210.0
    Are we in command of our motor acts? The popular belief holds that our conscious decisions are the direct causes of our actions. However, overwhelming evidence from neurosciences demonstrates that our actions are instead largely driven by brain processes that unfold outside of our consciousness. To study these brain processes, scientists have used a range of different functional brain imaging techniques and experimental protocols, such as subliminal priming. Here, we review recent advances in the field and propose a theoretical (...)
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  7. Anatol G. Feldman & Mindy F. Levin (1995). The Origin and Use of Positional Frames of Reference in Motor Control. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 18 (4):723.score: 210.0
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  8. John D. Gould & Amy Schaffer (1965). Partial Visual Feedback of Component Motions as a Function of Difficulty of Motor Control. Journal of Experimental Psychology 70 (6):564.score: 210.0
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  9. D. A. Laird (1923). Changes in Motor Control and Individual Variations Under the Influence of 'Razzing.". Journal of Experimental Psychology 6 (3):236.score: 210.0
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  10. Paul E. Tibbetts (2004). The Concept of Voluntary Motor Control in the Recent Neuroscientific Literature. Synthese 141 (2):247-76.score: 198.0
  11. Rick Grush (2004). The Emulation Theory of Representation: Motor Control, Imagery, and Perception. Behavioral And Brain Sciences 27 (3):377-396.score: 180.0
    The emulation theory of representation is developed and explored as a framework that can revealingly synthesize a wide variety of representational functions of the brain. The framework is based on constructs from control theory (forward models) and signal processing (Kalman filters). The idea is that in addition to simply engaging with the body and environment, the brain constructs neural circuits that act as models of the body and environment. During overt sensorimotor engagement, these models are driven by efference copies (...)
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  12. L. Pisella, A. Kritikos & Y. Rossetti (2001). Perception, Action, and Motor Control: Interaction Does Not Necessarily Imply Common Structures. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 24 (5):898-899.score: 180.0
    The Theory of Event Coding (TEC) provides a preliminary account of the interaction between perception and action, which is consistent with several recent findings in the area of motor control. Significant issues require integration and elaboration, however; particularly, distractor interference, automatic motor corrections, internal models of action, and neuroanatomical bases for the link between perception and action.
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  13. Barbara Tomasino, Corrado Corradi-Dell'Acqua, Alessia Tessari, Caterina Spiezio & Raffaella Ida Rumiati (2004). A Neuropsychological Approach to Motor Control and Imagery. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 27 (3):419-419.score: 180.0
    In his article Grush proposes a potentially useful framework for explaining motor control, imagery, and perception. In our commentary we will address two issues that the model does not seem to deal with appropriately: one concerns motor control, and the other, the visual and motor imagery domains. We will consider these two aspects in turn.
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  14. Bruce MacLennan, Field Computation in Motor Control.score: 180.0
    (brain area) to small (dendritic) scales. Further, it is often useful to describe motor control and sensorimotor coordination in terms of external elds such as force elds and sensory images. We survey the basic concepts of eld computation, including both feed-forward eld operations and eld dynamics resulting from recurrent connections. Adaptive and learning mechanisms are discussed brie y. The application of eld computation to motor control is illustrated by several examples: external force elds associated (...)
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  15. Arnold B. Mitnitski (1997). Kinematic Models Cannot Provide Insight Into Motor Control. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 20 (2):318-319.score: 180.0
    In Plamondon & Alimi's target article, a bell-shaped velocity profile typically observed in fast movements is used as a basis for the of motor control. In our opinion, kinematics is a necessary but insufficient ground for a theory of motor control. Relationships between different kinematic characteristics are an emergent property of the system dynamics controlled by the brain in a specific way. In particular, bell-shaped velocity profiles with or without additional waves are a trivial consequence of (...)
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  16. Roger Newport, Sally Pears & Stephen R. Jackson (2004). Evidence From Optic Ataxia Does Not Support a Distinction Between Planning and Control Mechanisms in Human Motor Control. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 27 (1):45-46.score: 174.0
    Evidence from optic ataxic patients with bilateral lesions to the superior parietal lobes does not support the view that there are separate planning and control mechanisms located in the IPL and SPL respectively. The aberrant reaches of patients with bilateral SPL damage towards extrafoveal targets seem to suggest a deficit in the selection of appropriate motor programmes rather than a deficit restricted to on-line control.
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  17. Friederike Schlaghecken Elizabeth Ann Maylor, Kulbir Singh Birak (2011). Inhibitory Motor Control in Old Age: Evidence for De-Automatization? Frontiers in Psychology 2.score: 168.0
    To examine age-related effects on high-level consciously-controlled and low-level automatically-controlled inhibitory processes, the Simon task was combined with the masked prime task in a hybrid procedure. Young and older adults responded to the identity of targets (left/right key-press to left-/right-pointing arrows) that appeared on the left/right of the screen and were preceded by left-/right-pointing backward-masked arrow primes at fixation. Responses were faster and more accurate when the target was congruent with its location than incongruent (Simon effect), and when the target (...)
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  18. Eric A. Roy & Ronald G. Marteniuk (1974). Mechanisms of Control in Motor Performance: Closed-Loop Vs Motor Programming Control. Journal of Experimental Psychology 103 (5):985.score: 168.0
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  19. Bill Faw (2003). Pre-Frontal Executive Committee for Perception, Working Memory, Attention, Long-Term Memory, Motor Control, and Thinking: A Tutorial Review. Consciousness and Cognition 12 (1):83-139.score: 162.0
  20. Tjeerd W. Boonstra (2013). The Potential of Corticomuscular and Intermuscular Coherence for Research on Human Motor Control. Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 7.score: 162.0
  21. Lewis Wolpert (2003). Causal Beliefs Lead to Toolmaking, Which Require Handedness for Motor Control. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 26 (2):242-242.score: 156.0
    Toolmaking requires motor skills that in turn require handedness, so that there is no competition between the two sides of the brain. Thus, handedness is not necessarily linked to vocalization but to the origin of causal beliefs required for making complex tools. Language may have evolved from these processes.
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  22. Michael A. Arbib & Jacob Spoelstra (1997). Microcomplexes: The Basic Unit of the Cerebellar Role in Adaptive Motor Control. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 20 (2):245-246.score: 156.0
    We offer a critique of the role of the parallel fiber beam as the unit of cerebellar computation, with the as its mode of operation. Instead we see the microcomplex linking cerebellar cortex and nuclei as the unit, with parallel fibers providing the means to coordinate the effects of microcomplexes in modulating various motor pattern generators (MPGs).
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  23. Petroc Sumner Jennifer McBride, Frédéric Boy, Masud Husain (2012). Automatic Motor Activation in the Executive Control of Action. Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 6.score: 156.0
    Although executive control and automatic behaviour have been often been considered separate and distinct processes, there is strong emerging and convergent evidence that they may in fact be intricately interlinked. In this review, we draw together evidence showing that visual stimuli cause automatic and unconscious motor activation, and how this in turn has implications for executive control. We discuss object affordances, alien limb syndrome, the visual grasp reflex, subliminal priming, and subliminal triggering of attentional orienting. Consideration of (...)
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  24. Jennifer McBride, Frédéric Boy, Masud Husain & Petroc Sumner (2012). Automatic Motor Activation in the Executive Control of Action. Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 6.score: 156.0
    Although executive control and automatic behaviour have been often been considered separate and distinct processes, there is strong emerging and convergent evidence that they may in fact be intricately interlinked. In this review, we draw together evidence showing that visual stimuli cause automatic and unconscious motor activation, and how this in turn has implications for executive control. We discuss object affordances, alien limb syndrome, the visual grasp reflex, subliminal priming, and subliminal triggering of attentional orienting. Consideration of (...)
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  25. Craig Weiss & John F. Disterhoft (1996). Eyeblink Conditioning, Motor Control, and the Analysis of Limbic-Cerebellar Interactions. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 19 (3):479-481.score: 156.0
    Several target articles in this BBS special issue address the topic of cerebellar and olivary functions, especially as they pertain to motor earning. Another important topic is the neural interaction between the limbic system and the cerebellum during associative learning. In this commentary we present some of our data on olivo-cerebellar and limbic-cerebellar interactions during eyeblink conditioning. [HOUK et al.; SIMPSON et al.; THACH].
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  26. T. Asai, E. Sugimori & Y. Tanno (2008). Schizotypal Personality Traits and Prediction of One's Own Movements in Motor Control: What Causes an Abnormal Sense of Agency? Consciousness and Cognition 17 (4):1131-1142.score: 150.0
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  27. S. V. Adamovich & A. G. Feldman (1989). The Prerequisites for One-Jint Motor Control Theories. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 12 (2):210.score: 150.0
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  28. Jeffrey Dean (1995). The Lambda Model is Only One Piece in the Motor Control Puzzle. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 18 (4):749.score: 150.0
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  29. A. G. Feldman (1992). Fundamentals of Motor Control, Kinesthesia and Spinal Neurons: In Search of a Theory. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 15 (4):735-737.score: 150.0
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  30. Ferdinando A. Mussa-Ivaldi (1995). Geometrical Principles in Motor Control. In Michael A. Arbib (ed.), Handbook of Brain Theory and Neural Networks. Mit Press. 434--438.score: 150.0
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  31. Christopher C. Pagano & Geoffrey P. Bingham (1995). Spatial Frames for Motor Control Would Be Commensurate with Spatial Frames for Vision and Proprioception, but What About Control of Energy Flows? Behavioral and Brain Sciences 18 (4):773.score: 150.0
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  32. Garrett E. Alexander, Mahlon R. DeLong & Michael D. Crutcher (1992). Naturalizing Motor Control Theory: Isn't It Time for a New Paradigm? Behavioral and Brain Sciences 15 (4):828-833.score: 150.0
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  33. Lea Awai & Armin Curt (2014). Intralimb Coordination as a Sensitive Indicator of Motor-Control Impairment After Spinal Cord Injury. Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 8.score: 150.0
  34. A. M. Gordon & D. A. Rosenbaum (1984). Conscious and Subconscious Arm Movements: Application of Signal Detection Theory to Motor Control. Bulletin of the Psychonomic Society 22 (3):214-216.score: 150.0
  35. Stephen Grossberg (1985). The Role of Learning in Sensory-Motor Control. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 8 (1):155-157.score: 150.0
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  36. J. A. Hoffer (1982). Central Control and Reflex Regulation of Mechanical Impedance: The Basis for a Unified Motor-Control Scheme. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 5 (4):548.score: 150.0
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  37. Williams Jacqueline (2012). Does Motor Imagery Ability Predict Reaching Correction Efficiency? A Test of Recent Models of Human Motor Control. Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 6.score: 150.0
  38. F. Lestienne, M. Ghafouri & F. Thullier (1995). What Does Body Configuration in Microgravity Tell Us About the Contribution of Intra- and Extrapersonal Frames of Reference for Motor Control? Behavioral and Brain Sciences 18 (4):766.score: 150.0
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  39. Philip Lieberman (1995). Manual Versus Speech Motor Control and the Evolution of Language. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 18 (1):197.score: 150.0
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  40. Gerald E. Loeb (1995). What Can We Expect From Models of Motor Control? Behavioral and Brain Sciences 18 (4):767.score: 150.0
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  41. Knight Robert (2011). The Role of the Lateral PFC in Inhibitory Motor Control. Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 5.score: 150.0
  42. Cunnington Ross (2012). Disentangling Motor Control Processes in the Basal Ganglia Using High-Resolution fMRI in a 3T Scanner. Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 6.score: 150.0
  43. D. Adrian Wilkinson (1971). Visual-Motor Control Loop: A Linear System? Journal of Experimental Psychology 89 (2):250.score: 150.0
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  44. M. B. Berkinblit, A. G. Feldman & O. I. Fukson (1986). In Search of the Theoretical Basis of Motor Control. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 9 (4):626.score: 150.0
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  45. Emilio Bizzi & Ferdinando A. Mussa-Ivaldi (1998). Neural Basis of Motor Control and its Cognitive Implications. Trends in Cognitive Sciences 2 (3):97-102.score: 150.0
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  46. Donald S. Borrett, Tet H. Yeap & Hon C. Kwan (1992). The Nonlinear Dynamics of Connectionist Networks: The Basis of Motor Control. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 15 (4):712-714.score: 150.0
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  47. James M. Bower (1992). Is the Cerebellum a Motor Control Device? Behavioral and Brain Sciences 15 (4):714-715.score: 150.0
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  48. Konrad Bresin & Michael D. Robinson (2013). Losing Control, Literally: Relations Between Anger Control, Trait Anger, and Motor Control. Cognition and Emotion 27 (6):995-1012.score: 150.0
  49. Liana E. Brown & David A. Rosenbaum (2002). Motor Control: Models. In Lynn Nadel (ed.), The Encyclopedia of Cognitive Science. Macmillan.score: 150.0
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  50. Chambers Chris (2013). The Effect of Proactive Motor Control on Impulsive Gambling and Eating Behaviour. Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 7.score: 150.0
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