Search results for 'Motor control' (try it on Scholar)

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  1. Todd C. Handy Julia W. Y. Kam, Elizabeth Dao, Patricia Blinn, Olav E. Krigolson, Lara A. Boyd (2012). Mind Wandering and Motor Control: Off-Task Thinking Disrupts the Online Adjustment of Behavior. Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 6.score: 174.0
    Mind wandering episodes have been construed as periods of "stimulus-independent" thought, where our minds are decoupled from the external sensory environment. In two experiments, we used behavioral and event-related potential (ERP) measures to determine whether mind wandering episodes can also be considered as periods of "response-independent" thought, with our minds disengaged from adjusting our behavioral outputs. In the first experiment, participants performed a motor tracking task and were occasionally prompted to report whether their attention was "on-task" or "mind wandering." (...)
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  2. Julia W. Y. Kam, Elizabeth Dao, Patricia Blinn, Olav E. Krigolson, Lara A. Boyd & Todd C. Handy (2012). Mind Wandering and Motor Control: Off-Task Thinking Disrupts the Online Adjustment of Behavior. Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 6.score: 174.0
    Mind wandering episodes have been construed as periods of "stimulus-independent" thought, where our minds are decoupled from the external sensory environment. In two experiments, we used behavioral and event-related potential (ERP) measures to determine whether mind wandering episodes can also be considered as periods of "response-independent" thought, with our minds disengaged from adjusting our behavioral outputs. In the first experiment, participants performed a motor tracking task and were occasionally prompted to report whether their attention was "on-task" or "mind wandering." (...)
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  3. Kevin D'ostilio & Gaëtan Garraux (2012). Brain Mechanisms Underlying Automatic and Unconscious Control of Motor Action. Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 6.score: 162.0
    Are we in command of our motor acts? The popular belief holds that our conscious decisions are the direct causes of our actions. However, overwhelming evidence from neurosciences demonstrates that our actions are instead largely driven by brain processes that unfold outside of our consciousness. To study these brain processes, scientists have used a range of different functional brain imaging techniques and experimental protocols, such as subliminal priming. Here, we review recent advances in the field and propose a theoretical (...)
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  4. Gaëtan Garraux Kevin D'Ostilio (2012). Brain Mechanisms Underlying Automatic and Unconscious Control of Motor Action. Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 6.score: 162.0
    Are we in command of our motor acts? The popular belief holds that our conscious decisions are the direct causes of our actions. However, overwhelming evidence from neurosciences demonstrates that our actions are instead largely driven by brain processes that unfold outside of our consciousness. To study these brain processes, scientists have used a range of different functional brain imaging techniques and experimental protocols, such as subliminal priming. Here, we review recent advances in the field and propose a theoretical (...)
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  5. John F. Mathers & Madeleine A. Grealy (2014). Motor Control Strategies and the Effects of Fatigue on Golf Putting Performance. Frontiers in Psychology 4.score: 150.0
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  6. M. B. Berkinblit, A. G. Feldman & O. I. Fukson (1986). Adaptability of Innate Motor Patterns and Motor Control Mechanisms. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 9 (4):585.score: 150.0
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  7. Anatol G. Feldman & Mindy F. Levin (1995). The Origin and Use of Positional Frames of Reference in Motor Control. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 18 (4):723.score: 150.0
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  8. John D. Gould & Amy Schaffer (1965). Partial Visual Feedback of Component Motions as a Function of Difficulty of Motor Control. Journal of Experimental Psychology 70 (6):564.score: 150.0
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  9. D. A. Laird (1923). Changes in Motor Control and Individual Variations Under the Influence of 'Razzing.". Journal of Experimental Psychology 6 (3):236.score: 150.0
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  10. Paul E. Tibbetts (2004). The Concept of Voluntary Motor Control in the Recent Neuroscientific Literature. Synthese 141 (2):247-76.score: 138.0
  11. Rick Grush (2004). The Emulation Theory of Representation: Motor Control, Imagery, and Perception. Behavioral And Brain Sciences 27 (3):377-396.score: 120.0
    The emulation theory of representation is developed and explored as a framework that can revealingly synthesize a wide variety of representational functions of the brain. The framework is based on constructs from control theory (forward models) and signal processing (Kalman filters). The idea is that in addition to simply engaging with the body and environment, the brain constructs neural circuits that act as models of the body and environment. During overt sensorimotor engagement, these models are driven by efference copies (...)
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  12. L. Pisella, A. Kritikos & Y. Rossetti (2001). Perception, Action, and Motor Control: Interaction Does Not Necessarily Imply Common Structures. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 24 (5):898-899.score: 120.0
    The Theory of Event Coding (TEC) provides a preliminary account of the interaction between perception and action, which is consistent with several recent findings in the area of motor control. Significant issues require integration and elaboration, however; particularly, distractor interference, automatic motor corrections, internal models of action, and neuroanatomical bases for the link between perception and action.
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  13. Barbara Tomasino, Corrado Corradi-Dell'Acqua, Alessia Tessari, Caterina Spiezio & Raffaella Ida Rumiati (2004). A Neuropsychological Approach to Motor Control and Imagery. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 27 (3):419-419.score: 120.0
    In his article Grush proposes a potentially useful framework for explaining motor control, imagery, and perception. In our commentary we will address two issues that the model does not seem to deal with appropriately: one concerns motor control, and the other, the visual and motor imagery domains. We will consider these two aspects in turn.
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  14. Bruce MacLennan, Field Computation in Motor Control.score: 120.0
    (brain area) to small (dendritic) scales. Further, it is often useful to describe motor control and sensorimotor coordination in terms of external elds such as force elds and sensory images. We survey the basic concepts of eld computation, including both feed-forward eld operations and eld dynamics resulting from recurrent connections. Adaptive and learning mechanisms are discussed brie y. The application of eld computation to motor control is illustrated by several examples: external force elds associated (...)
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  15. Arnold B. Mitnitski (1997). Kinematic Models Cannot Provide Insight Into Motor Control. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 20 (2):318-319.score: 120.0
    In Plamondon & Alimi's target article, a bell-shaped velocity profile typically observed in fast movements is used as a basis for the of motor control. In our opinion, kinematics is a necessary but insufficient ground for a theory of motor control. Relationships between different kinematic characteristics are an emergent property of the system dynamics controlled by the brain in a specific way. In particular, bell-shaped velocity profiles with or without additional waves are a trivial consequence of (...)
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  16. Eric A. Roy & Ronald G. Marteniuk (1974). Mechanisms of Control in Motor Performance: Closed-Loop Vs Motor Programming Control. Journal of Experimental Psychology 103 (5):985.score: 120.0
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  17. Roger Newport, Sally Pears & Stephen R. Jackson (2004). Evidence From Optic Ataxia Does Not Support a Distinction Between Planning and Control Mechanisms in Human Motor Control. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 27 (1):45-46.score: 114.0
    Evidence from optic ataxic patients with bilateral lesions to the superior parietal lobes does not support the view that there are separate planning and control mechanisms located in the IPL and SPL respectively. The aberrant reaches of patients with bilateral SPL damage towards extrafoveal targets seem to suggest a deficit in the selection of appropriate motor programmes rather than a deficit restricted to on-line control.
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  18. Elisabeth Pacherie (2011). Nonconceptual Representations for Action and the Limits of Intentional Control. Social Psychology 42 (1):67-73.score: 108.0
    In this paper I argue that, to make intentional actions fully intelligible, we need to posit representations of action the content of which is nonconceptual. I further argue that an analysis of the properties of these nonconceptual representations, and of their relation- ships to action representations at higher levels, sheds light on the limits of intentional control. On the one hand, the capacity to form nonconceptual representations of goal-directed movements underscores the capacity to acquire executable concepts of these movements, (...)
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  19. Timothy D. Lee Elizabeth A. Sanli, Jae T. Patterson, Steven R. Bray (2012). Understanding Self-Controlled Motor Learning Protocols Through the Self-Determination Theory. Frontiers in Psychology 3.score: 108.0
    The purpose of the present review was to provide a theoretical understanding of the learning advantages underlying a self-controlled practice context through the tenets of the self-determination theory (SDT). Three micro theories within the macro theory of SDT (Basic psychological needs theory, Cognitive Evaluation Theory & Organismic Integration Theory) are used as a framework for examining the current self-controlled motor learning literature. A review of 26 peer-reviewed, empirical studies from the motor learning and medical training literature revealed an (...)
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  20. Timothy V. Nguyen Jeffrey T. Fairbrother, David D. Laughlin (2012). Self-Controlled Feedback Facilitates Motor Learning in Both High and Low Activity Individuals. Frontiers in Psychology 3.score: 108.0
    The purpose of this study was to determine if high and low activity individuals differed in terms of the effects of self-controlled feedback on the performance and learning of a movement skill. The task consisted of a blindfolded beanbag toss using the non-preferred arm. Participants were pre-screened according to their physical activity level using the International Physical Activity Questionnaire. An equal number of high activity (HA) and low activity (LA) participants were assigned to self-control (SC) and yoked (YK) feedback (...)
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  21. Friederike Schlaghecken Elizabeth Ann Maylor, Kulbir Singh Birak (2011). Inhibitory Motor Control in Old Age: Evidence for De-Automatization? Frontiers in Psychology 2.score: 108.0
    To examine age-related effects on high-level consciously-controlled and low-level automatically-controlled inhibitory processes, the Simon task was combined with the masked prime task in a hybrid procedure. Young and older adults responded to the identity of targets (left/right key-press to left-/right-pointing arrows) that appeared on the left/right of the screen and were preceded by left-/right-pointing backward-masked arrow primes at fixation. Responses were faster and more accurate when the target was congruent with its location than incongruent (Simon effect), and when the target (...)
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  22. Srikantan S. Nagarajan John F. Houde (2011). Speech Production as State Feedback Control. Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 5.score: 108.0
    Spoken language exists because of a remarkable neural process. Inside a speaker’s brain, an intended message gives rise to neural signals activating the muscles of the vocal tract. The process is remarkable because these muscles are activated in just the right way that the vocal tract produces sounds a listener understands as the intended message. What is the best approach to understanding the neural substrate of this crucial motor control process? One of the key recent modeling developments in (...)
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  23. Thierry Chaminade, Jennifer L. Marchant, James Kilner & Christopher D. Frith (2012). An fMRI Study of Joint Action–Varying Levels of Cooperation Correlates with Activity in Control Networks. Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 6.score: 108.0
    As social agents, humans continuously interact with with the people around them. Here, motor cooperation was investigated by designing a situation in which pairs of participants, one being scanned with fMRI, controlled jointly a visually presented object with joystick movements. The object oscillated dynamically along two dimensions, shades of pink and width of gratings, corresponding to the two cardinal directions of joystick movements. While the overall control of each participant on the object was kept constant, the amount of (...)
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  24. Petroc Sumner Jennifer McBride, Frédéric Boy, Masud Husain (2012). Automatic Motor Activation in the Executive Control of Action. Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 6.score: 108.0
    Although executive control and automatic behaviour have been often been considered separate and distinct processes, there is strong emerging and convergent evidence that they may in fact be intricately interlinked. In this review, we draw together evidence showing that visual stimuli cause automatic and unconscious motor activation, and how this in turn has implications for executive control. We discuss object affordances, alien limb syndrome, the visual grasp reflex, subliminal priming, and subliminal triggering of attentional orienting. Consideration of (...)
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  25. Jennifer McBride, Frédéric Boy, Masud Husain & Petroc Sumner (2012). Automatic Motor Activation in the Executive Control of Action. Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 6.score: 108.0
    Although executive control and automatic behaviour have been often been considered separate and distinct processes, there is strong emerging and convergent evidence that they may in fact be intricately interlinked. In this review, we draw together evidence showing that visual stimuli cause automatic and unconscious motor activation, and how this in turn has implications for executive control. We discuss object affordances, alien limb syndrome, the visual grasp reflex, subliminal priming, and subliminal triggering of attentional orienting. Consideration of (...)
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  26. Christopher D. Frith Thierry Chaminade, Jennifer L. Marchant, James Kilner (2012). An fMRI Study of Joint Action–Varying Levels of Cooperation Correlates with Activity in Control Networks. Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 6.score: 108.0
    As social agents, humans continuously interact with with the people around them. Here, motor cooperation was investigated by designing a situation in which pairs of participants, one being scanned with fMRI, controlled jointly a visually presented object with joystick movements. The object oscillated dynamically along two dimensions, shades of pink and width of gratings, corresponding to the two cardinal directions of joystick movements. While the overall control of each participant on the object was kept constant, the amount of (...)
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  27. B. C. Wijk, P. J. Beek & A. Daffertshofer (2011). Neural Synchrony Within the Motor System: What Have We Learned so Far? Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 6:252-252.score: 108.0
    Synchronization of neural activity is considered essential for information processing in the nervous system. Both local and inter-regional synchronization are omnipresent in different frequency regimes and relate to a variety of behavioral and cognitive functions. Over the years, many studies have sought to elucidate the question how alpha/mu, beta, and gamma synchronization contribute to motor control. Here, we review these studies with the purpose to delineate what they have added to our understanding of the neural control of (...)
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  28. Bill Faw (2003). Pre-Frontal Executive Committee for Perception, Working Memory, Attention, Long-Term Memory, Motor Control, and Thinking: A Tutorial Review. Consciousness and Cognition 12 (1):83-139.score: 102.0
  29. Pete Mandik (2010). Control Consciousness. Topics in Cognitive Science 2 (4):643-657.score: 102.0
    Control consciousness is the awareness or experience of seeming to be in control of one’s actions. One view, which I will be arguing against in the present paper, is that control consciousness is a form of sensory consciousness. In such a view, control consciousness is exhausted by sensory elements such as tactile and proprioceptive information. An opposing view, which I will be arguing for, is that sensory elements cannot be the whole story and must be supplemented (...)
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  30. Myrto I. Mylopoulos (2011). Why Reject a Sensory Imagery Theory of Control Consciousness? Topics in Cognitive Science 3 (2):268-272.score: 102.0
    Mandik (2010) defends a motor theory of control consciousness according to which nonsensory states, like motor commands, directly contribute to the awareness we have of ourselves as being in control of our actions. Along the way, he argues that his theory is to be preferred over Prinz’s (2007) sensory imagery theory, which denies that nonsensory states play any direct role in the generation of control consciousness. I argue that Mandik’s criticisms of Prinz’s theory fall short, (...)
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  31. Anne Giersch, Hélène Wilquin, Rémi L. Capa & Yvonne Nathalie Delevoye-Turrell (2013). Combined Visual and Motor Disorganization in Patients with Schizophrenia. Frontiers in Psychology 4.score: 102.0
    Cognitive impairments are difficult to relate to clinical symptoms in schizophrenia, partly due to insufficient knowledge on how cognitive impairments interact with one another. Here, we devised a new sequential pointing task requiring both visual organization and motor sequencing. Six circles were presented simultaneously on a touch screen around a fixation point. Participants pointed with the finger each circle one after the other, in synchrony with auditory tones. We used an alternating rhythmic 300/600 ms pattern so that participants performed (...)
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  32. Tjeerd W. Boonstra (2013). The Potential of Corticomuscular and Intermuscular Coherence for Research on Human Motor Control. Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 7.score: 102.0
  33. James H. Abbs & Roxanne DePaul (1998). Motor Cortex Fields and Speech Movements: Simple Dual Control is Implausible. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 21 (4):511-512.score: 96.0
    We applaud the spirit of MacNeilage's attempts to better explain the evolution and cortical control of speech by drawing on the vast literature in nonhuman primate neurobiology. However, he oversimplifies motor cortical fields and their known individual functions to such an extent that he undermines the value of his effort. In particular, MacNeilage has lumped together the functional characteristics across multiple mesial and lateral motor cortex fields, inadvertantly creating two hypothetical centers that simply may not exist.
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  34. Lewis Wolpert (2003). Causal Beliefs Lead to Toolmaking, Which Require Handedness for Motor Control. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 26 (2):242-242.score: 96.0
    Toolmaking requires motor skills that in turn require handedness, so that there is no competition between the two sides of the brain. Thus, handedness is not necessarily linked to vocalization but to the origin of causal beliefs required for making complex tools. Language may have evolved from these processes.
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  35. Michael A. Arbib & Jacob Spoelstra (1997). Microcomplexes: The Basic Unit of the Cerebellar Role in Adaptive Motor Control. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 20 (2):245-246.score: 96.0
    We offer a critique of the role of the parallel fiber beam as the unit of cerebellar computation, with the as its mode of operation. Instead we see the microcomplex linking cerebellar cortex and nuclei as the unit, with parallel fibers providing the means to coordinate the effects of microcomplexes in modulating various motor pattern generators (MPGs).
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  36. H. Branch Coslett & Laurel J. Buxbaum (2004). The Planning–Control Model and Spatio-Motor Deficits Following Brain Damage. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 27 (1):31-32.score: 96.0
    Glover's planning–control model accommodates a substantial number of findings from subjects who have motor deficits as a consequence of brain lesions. A number of consistently observed and robust findings are not, however, explained by Glover's theory; additionally, the claim that the IPL supports planning whereas the SPL supports control is not consistently supported in the literature.
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  37. Craig Weiss & John F. Disterhoft (1996). Eyeblink Conditioning, Motor Control, and the Analysis of Limbic-Cerebellar Interactions. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 19 (3):479-481.score: 96.0
    Several target articles in this BBS special issue address the topic of cerebellar and olivary functions, especially as they pertain to motor earning. Another important topic is the neural interaction between the limbic system and the cerebellum during associative learning. In this commentary we present some of our data on olivo-cerebellar and limbic-cerebellar interactions during eyeblink conditioning. [HOUK et al.; SIMPSON et al.; THACH].
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  38. Esther Thelen, Gregor Schöner, Christian Scheier & Linda B. Smith (2001). The Dynamics of Embodiment: A Field Theory of Infant Perseverative Reaching. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 24 (1):1-34.score: 90.0
    The overall goal of this target article is to demonstrate a mechanism for an embodied cognition. The particular vehicle is a much-studied, but still widely debated phenomenon seen in 7–12 month-old-infants. In Piaget's classic “A-not-B error,” infants who have successfully uncovered a toy at location “A” continue to reach to that location even after they watch the toy hidden in a nearby location “B.” Here, we question the traditional explanations of the error as an indicator of infants' concepts of objects (...)
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  39. T. Asai, E. Sugimori & Y. Tanno (2008). Schizotypal Personality Traits and Prediction of One's Own Movements in Motor Control: What Causes an Abnormal Sense of Agency? Consciousness and Cognition 17 (4):1131-1142.score: 90.0
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  40. Gregory B. Bonn (2013). Re-Conceptualizing Free Will for the 21st Century: Acting Independently with a Limited Role for Consciousness. Frontiers in Psychology 4:920.score: 90.0
    This paper examines the concept of free will, or independent action, in light of recent research in psychology and neuroscience. Reviewing findings in memory, prospection, and mental simulation, as well as the neurological mechanisms underlying behavioral control, planning, and integration, it is suggested in accord with previous arguments (e.g. Harris, 2012; Wegner, 2003) that a folk conception of free will as entirely conscious control over behavior should be rejected. However, it is argued that, when taken together, these findings (...)
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  41. David A. Havas & James Matheson (2013). The Functional Role of the Periphery in Emotional Language Comprehension. Frontiers in Psychology 4.score: 90.0
    Language can impact emotion, even when it makes no reference to emotion states. For example, reading sentences with positive meanings (“The water park is refreshing on the hot summer day”) induces patterns of facial feedback congruent with the sentence emotionality (smiling), whereas sentences with negative meanings induce a frown. Moreover, blocking facial afference with botox selectively slows comprehension of emotional sentences. Therefore, theories of cognition should account for emotion-language interactions above the level of explicit emotion words, and the role of (...)
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  42. S. V. Adamovich & A. G. Feldman (1989). The Prerequisites for One-Jint Motor Control Theories. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 12 (2):210.score: 90.0
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  43. A. G. Feldman (1992). Fundamentals of Motor Control, Kinesthesia and Spinal Neurons: In Search of a Theory. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 15 (4):735-737.score: 90.0
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  44. Ferdinando A. Mussa-Ivaldi (1995). Geometrical Principles in Motor Control. In Michael A. Arbib (ed.), Handbook of Brain Theory and Neural Networks. Mit Press. 434--438.score: 90.0
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  45. Lea Awai & Armin Curt (2014). Intralimb Coordination as a Sensitive Indicator of Motor-Control Impairment After Spinal Cord Injury. Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 8.score: 90.0
  46. Bettina Pollok Claudia Wach, Vanessa Krause, Vera Moliadze, Walter Paulus, Alfons Schnitzler (2013). The Effect of 10 Hz Transcranial Alternating Current Stimulation (tACS) on Corticomuscular Coherence. Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 7:511-511.score: 90.0
    Synchronous oscillatory activity at alpha (8-12 Hz), beta (13-30 Hz), and gamma (30-90 Hz) fre-quencies is assumed to play a key role for motor control. Corticomuscular coherence (CMC) represents an established measure of the pyramidal system’s integrity. Transcranial alternating current stimulation (tACS) offers the possibility to modulate ongoing oscillatory activity. Behaviourally, 20 Hz tACS in healthy subjects has been shown to result in movement slowing. However, the neurophysiological changes underlying these effects are not entirely understood yet. The present (...)
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  47. Jeffrey Dean (1995). The Lambda Model is Only One Piece in the Motor Control Puzzle. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 18 (4):749.score: 90.0
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  48. A. M. Gordon & D. A. Rosenbaum (1984). Conscious and Subconscious Arm Movements: Application of Signal Detection Theory to Motor Control. Bulletin of the Psychonomic Society 22 (3):214-216.score: 90.0
  49. Stephen Grossberg (1985). The Role of Learning in Sensory-Motor Control. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 8 (1):155-157.score: 90.0
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  50. Aymeric Guillot, Franck Di Rienzo, Tadhg MacIntyre, Aidan Moran & Christian Collet (2012). Imagining is Not Doing but Involves Specific Motor Commands: A Review of Experimental Data Related to Motor Inhibition. [REVIEW] Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 6.score: 90.0
    There is now compelling evidence that motor imagery (MI) and actual movement share common neural substrate. However, the question of how MI inhibits the transmission of motor commands into the efferent pathways in order to prevent any movement is largely unresolved. Similarly, little is known about the nature of the electromyographic activity that is apparent during MI. In addressing these gaps in the literature, the present paper argues that MI includes motor execution commands for muscle contractions which (...)
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