Search results for 'Movement' (try it on Scholar)

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  1.  52
    Laura B. DeLind (2011). Are Local Food and the Local Food Movement Taking Us Where We Want to Go? Or Are We Hitching Our Wagons to the Wrong Stars? Agriculture and Human Values 28 (2):273-283.
    Much is being made of local food. It is at once a social movement, a diet, and an economic strategy—a popular solution—to a global food system in great distress. Yet, despite its popularity or perhaps because of it, local food (especially in the US) is also something of a chimera if not a tool of the status quo. This paper reflects on and contrasts aspects of current local food rhetoric with Dalhberg’s notion of a regenerative food system. It identifies (...)
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  2.  43
    Erik D. Reichle, Keith Rayner & Alexander Pollatsek (2003). The E-Z Reader Model of Eye-Movement Control in Reading: Comparisons to Other Models. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 26 (4):445-476.
    The E-Z Reader model (Reichle et al. 1998; 1999) provides a theoretical framework for understanding how word identification, visual processing, attention, and oculomotor control jointly determine when and where the eyes move during reading. In this article, we first review what is known about eye movements during reading. Then we provide an updated version of the model (E-Z Reader 7) and describe how it accounts for basic findings about eye movement control in reading. We then review several alternative models (...)
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  3. Tom Burke (2010). Empiricism, Pragmatism, and the Settlement Movement. The Pluralist 5 (3):73-88.
    This paper examines the settlement movement (a social reform movement during the Progressive Era, roughly 1890–1920) in order to illustrate what pragmatism is and is not. In 1906, Mary Kingsbury Simkhovitch proposed an analysis of settlement house methods. Because of her emphasis on interpretation and action, and because of the nature of the settlement movement as a social reform effort with vitally important consequences for everyone involved, it might be thought that her analysis would be pragmatist in (...)
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  4. Maxine Sheets-Johnstone (2012). From Movement to Dance. Phenomenology and the Cognitive Sciences 11 (1):39-57.
    This article begins with a summary phenomenological analysis of movement in conjunction with the question of “quality” in movement. It then specifies the particular kind of memory involved in a dancer’s memorization of a dance. On the basis of the phenomenological analysis and specification of memory, it proceeds to a clarification of meaning in dance. Taking its clue from the preceding sections, the concluding section of the article sets forth reasons why present-day cognitive science is unable to provide (...)
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  5. Renaud Barbaras (2008). Life, Movement, and Desire. Research in Phenomenology 38 (1):3-17.
    In French, the verb "to live" designates both being alive and the experience of something. This ambiguity has a philosophical meaning. The task of a phenomenology of life is to describe an originary sense of living from which the very distinction between life in the intransitive sense and life in the transitive, or intentional, sense proceeds. Hans Jonas is one of those rare authors who has tried to give an account of the specificity of life instead of reducing life to (...)
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  6.  27
    Frédérique Déjean, Stéphanie Giamporcaro, Jean-Pascal Gond, Bernard Leca & Elise Penalva-Icher (2013). Mistaking an Emerging Market for a Social Movement? A Comment on Arjaliès' Social-Movement Perspective on Socially Responsible Investment in France. Journal of Business Ethics 112 (2):205-212.
    In a recent contribution to this journal, Arjaliès (J Bus Ethics 92:57—78, 2010) suggests that the emergence of socially responsible investment (SRI) in France can be best described as a social movement with a collective identity that aimed to challenge the dominant logic of the financial market. Such an account is at odds with a body of empirical studies that approaches SRI in the French context as a process of market creation led by loosely coordinated actors with contradictory and (...)
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  7.  83
    Pierre Pica (1981). Some Theoretical Implications of the Study of NP-Movement in Some Scandinavian Languages. In Thorstein Fretheim & Lars Hellan (eds.), Papers from the sixth Scandinavian Conference of Linguistics.
    We argue that there exist two kinds of passive structures, a) one generated in the base b) the other transformationally derived by the structure preserving-rule of move-NP. Assuming a Case theory along the lmines of Chomsky (1978), we want to argue a) that some oblique Cases are assigned in the base b) that NP movement can move an oblique Case assigned in the base c) that movement should not be defined in terms of Case but in terms of (...)
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  8.  50
    Rudolph Bauer (2011). Awareness and Movement in Dzogchen. Transmission 2.
    This paper focuses on awareness and movement in dzogchen.
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  9.  89
    Barbara Montero (2006). Proprioceiving Someone Else's Movement. Philosophical Explorations 9 (2):149 – 161.
    Proprioception - the sense by which we come to know the positions and movements of our bodies - is thought to be necessarily confined to the body of the perceiver. That is, it is thought that while proprioception can inform you as to whether your left knee is bent or straight, it cannot inform you as to whether someone else's knee is bent or straight. But while proprioception certainly provides us with information about the positions and movements of our own (...)
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  10.  3
    David J. Stevens, Joanne Arciuli & David I. Anderson (2015). Concurrent Movement Impairs Incidental But Not Intentional Statistical Learning. Cognitive Science 39 (5):1081-1098.
    The effect of concurrent movement on incidental versus intentional statistical learning was examined in two experiments. In Experiment 1, participants learned the statistical regularities embedded within familiarization stimuli implicitly, whereas in Experiment 2 they were made aware of the embedded regularities and were instructed explicitly to learn these regularities. Experiment 1 demonstrated that while the control group were able to learn the statistical regularities, the resistance-free cycling group and the exercise group did not demonstrate learning. This is in contrast (...)
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  11.  4
    Aya Hirata Kimura & Mima Nishiyama (2008). The Chisan-Chisho Movement: Japanese Local Food Movement and its Challenges. [REVIEW] Agriculture and Human Values 25 (1):49-64.
    This paper examines the increasingly popular chisan-chisho movement that has promoted the localization of food consumption in Japan since the late-1990s. Chisan-chisho emerged in the context of a perceived crisis in the Japanese food system, particularly the long-term decline of agriculture and rural community and more recent episodes of food scandals. Although initially started as a grassroots movement, many chisan-chisho initiatives are now organized by governments and farmers’ cooperatives. Acknowledging that the chisan-chisho movement has added some important (...)
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  12.  25
    Luc K. Audebrand & Thierry C. Pauchant (2009). Can the Fair Trade Movement Enrich Traditional Business Ethics? An Historical Study of its Founders in Mexico. Journal of Business Ethics 87 (3):343 - 353.
    As the need for more diversity in business ethics is becoming more pressing in our global world, we provide an historical study of a Fair Trade (FT) movement, born in rural Mexico. We first focus on the basic assumptions of its founders, which include a worker–priest, Frans van der Hoff, a group of native Indians and local farmers who formed a cooperative, and an NGO, Max Havelaar. We then review both the originalities and challenges of the FT movement (...)
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  13.  16
    Samantha Noll (2014). Liberalism and the Two Directions of the Local Food Movement. Journal of Agricultural and Environmental Ethics 27 (2):211-224.
    The local food movement is, increasingly, becoming a part of the modern American landscape. However, while it appears that the local food movement is gaining momentum, one could question whether or not this trend is, in fact, politically and socially sustainable. Is local food just another trend that will fade away or is it here to stay? One way to begin addressing this question is to ascertain whether or not it is compatible with liberalism, a set of influential (...)
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  14.  6
    Lucia Angelino (2015). Drawing From Merleau-Ponty’s Conception of Movement as Primordial Expression. Research in Phenomenology 45 (2):288-302.
    _ Source: _Volume 45, Issue 2, pp 288 - 302 In this paper I intend to show that Merleau-Ponty’s conception of movement as primordial expression, whereby movement is a shaping force that can be discerned in the forms it creates, allows us to go beyond the superficial definition of movement as “change of place” and discover its most essential characteristic: that is the expression of a motion—intrinsic to feeling—which can take on the form of either a generative (...)
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  15.  67
    Alba Papa-Grimaldi (2007). The Presumption of Movement. Axiomathes 17 (2):137-154.
    The conceptualisation of movement has always been problematical for Western thought, ever since Parmenides declared our incapacity to conceptualise the plurality of change because our self-identical thought can only know an identical being. Exploiting this peculiar feature and constraint on our thought, Zeno of Elea devised his famous paradoxes of movement in which he shows that the passage from a position to movement cannot be conceptualised. In this paper, I argue that this same constraint is at the (...)
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  16.  3
    Elena Guerzoni (2006). Intervention Effects on NPIs and Feature Movement: Towards a Unified Account of Intervention. [REVIEW] Natural Language Semantics 14 (4):359-398.
    In this paper, I explore the possibility of understanding locality restrictions on the distribution of Negative Polarity Items (NPIs) as a consequence of covert movement. The present proposal restates Linebarger’s Immediate Scope Constraint in terms of morphology-driven checking requirements. These requirements cannot be met if a blocking element intervenes between the NPI feature and its morphosemantic licenser at Logical Form (LF). The empirical generalization is that the class of NPI ‘blocking expressions’ (a.k.a. ‘interveners’) overlaps to a large extent with (...)
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  17.  12
    Philipp Altmann (2016). “The Right to Self-Determination”: Right and Laws Between Means of Oppression and Means of Liberation in the Discourse of the Indigenous Movement of Ecuador. International Journal for the Semiotics of Law - Revue Internationale de Sémiotique Juridique 29 (1):121-134.
    The 1970s and 1980s meant an ethnic politicization of the indigenous movement in Ecuador, until this moment defined largely as a class-based movement of indigenous peasants. The indigenous organizations started to conceptualize indigenous peoples as nationalities with their own economic, social, cultural and legal structures and therefore with the right to autonomy and self-determination. Based on this conceptualization, the movement developed demands for a pluralist reform of state and society in order to install a plurinational state with (...)
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  18.  61
    Jussi Backman (2005). Divine and Mortal Motivation: On the Movement of Life in Aristotle and Heidegger. Continental Philosophy Review 38 (3-4):241-261.
    The paper discusses Heidegger's early notion of the “movedness of life” (Lebensbewegtheit) and its intimate connection with Aristotle's concept of movement (kinēsis). Heidegger's aim in the period of Being and Time was to “overcome” the Greek ideal of being as ousia – constant and complete presence and availability – by showing that the background for all meaningful presence is Dasein, the ecstatically temporal context of human being. Life as the event of finitude is characterized by an essential lack and (...)
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  19.  48
    Timothy Mooney (2011). Plasticity, Motor Intentionality and Concrete Movement in Merleau-Ponty. Continental Philosophy Review 44 (4):359-381.
    Merleau-Ponty’s explication of concrete or practical movement by way of the Schneider case could be read as ending up close to automatism, neglecting its flexibility and plasticity in the face of obstacles. It can be contended that he already goes off course in his explication of Schneider’s condition. Rasmus Jensen has argued that he assimilates a normal person’s motor intentionality to the patient’s, thereby generating a vacuity problem. I argue that Schneider’s difficulties with certain movements point to a means (...)
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  20.  43
    David Morris (2005). What is Living and What is Non-Living in Merleau-Ponty's Philosophy of Movement and Expression. Chiasmi International 7:225-238.
    In ancient philosophy life has priority: non-living matter is made intelligible by living activity. The modern evolutionary synthesis reverses this priority: life is a passive result of blind, non-living material processes. But recent work in science and philosophy puts that reversal in question, by emphasizing how living beings are self-organizing and active. “Naturalizing” this new emphasis on living activity requires not simply a return to ancient philosophy but a new ontology, a new concept of nature. To explore that ontology, I (...)
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  21.  54
    Claire L. Pouncey & Jonathan M. Lukens (2010). Madness Versus Badness: The Ethical Tension Between the Recovery Movement and Forensic Psychiatry. [REVIEW] Theoretical Medicine and Bioethics 31 (1):93-105.
    The mental health recovery movement promotes patient self-determination and opposes coercive psychiatric treatment. While it has made great strides towards these ends, its rhetoric impairs its political efficacy. We illustrate how psychiatry can share recovery values and yet appear to violate them. In certain criminal proceedings, for example, forensic psychiatrists routinely argue that persons with mental illness who have committed crimes are not full moral agents. Such arguments align with the recovery movement’s aim of providing appropriate treatment and (...)
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  22.  19
    Alia Al-Saji (2012). Creating Possibility: The Time of the Quebec Student Movement. Theory and Event 15 (3).
    Introduction: -/- Walking, illegally, down main Montreal thoroughfares with students in nightly demonstrations, with neighbors whom I barely knew before, banging pots and pans, and with tens, if not hundreds, of thousands of people on every 22nd of the month since March—this was unimaginable a year ago.1 Unimaginable that the collective and heterogeneous body, which is the “manif [demonstration]”, could feel so much like home, despite its internal differences. Unimaginable that this mutual dependence on one another could enable not only (...)
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  23.  36
    Ana Delgado (2008). Opening Up for Participation in Agro-Biodiversity Conservation: The Expert-Lay Interplay in a Brazilian Social Movement. [REVIEW] Journal of Agricultural and Environmental Ethics 21 (6):559-577.
    In science and environmental studies, there is a general concern for the democratization of the expert-lay interplay. However, the democratization of expertise does not necessarily lead to more sustainable decisions. If citizens do not take the sustainable choice, what should experts and decision makers do? Should the expert-lay interplay be dissolved? In thinking about how to shape the expert-lay interplay in a better way in agro-biodiversity conservation, I take the case of the MST (Movimento Sem Terra/Landless People’s Movement), possibly (...)
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  24.  20
    Marc Lavine (2009). From Scholarly Dialogue to Social Movement: Considerations and Implications for Peace Through Commerce. [REVIEW] Journal of Business Ethics 89 (4):603 - 615.
    While Peace through Commerce (PTC) started as a conversation among a small group of scholars it has grown into an increasingly robust movement, giving rise to conferences, books, journal articles, and dialogue between scholars, managers, practitioners, government officials, and civil society actors, all of whom share an interest in the potential of commerce to foster greater peace. Because social movement scholarship explores the ability of collective interests to achieve social change it provides a useful lens through which to (...)
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  25.  27
    Alexander Klippel (2011). Movement Choremes: Bridging Cognitive Understanding and Formal Characterizations of Movement Patterns1. Topics in Cognitive Science 3 (4):722-740.
    This article discusses an approach to characterizing movement patterns (paths/trajectories) of individual agents that allows for relating aspects of cognitive conceptualization of movement patterns with formal spatial characterizations. To this end, we adopt a perspective of characterizing movement patterns on the basis of perceptual and conceptual invariants that we term movement choremes (MCs). MCs are formally grounded by behaviorally validating qualitative spatio-temporal calculi. Relating perceptual and cognitive aspects of space and formal theories of spatial information has (...)
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  26.  6
    Elizabeth de Freitas & Francesca Ferrara (2015). Movement, Memory and Mathematics: Henri Bergson and the Ontology of Learning. Studies in Philosophy and Education 34 (6):565-585.
    Using the work of philosopher Henri Bergson to examine the nature of movement and memory, this article contributes to recent research on the role of the body in learning mathematics. Our aim in this paper is to introduce the ideas of Bergson and to show how these ideas shed light on mathematics classroom activity. Bergson’s monist philosophy provides a framework for understanding the materiality of both bodies and mathematical concepts. We discuss two case studies of classrooms to show how (...)
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  27.  6
    David H. Fleming (2013). Charcoal Matter with Memory: Images of Movement, Time and Duration in the Animated Films of William Kentridge. Film-Philosophy 17 (1):402-423.
    In his temporal philosophy based on the writing of Henri Bergson, Gilles Deleuze describes duration ( durée ) as a becoming that endures in time. Reifications of this complex philosophical concept become artistically expressed, I argue, in the form and content of South African artist William Kentridge's series of 'charcoal drawings for projection.' These exhibited art works provide intriguing and illuminating 'philosophical' examples of animated audio-visual media, which expressively plicate distinct images of movement and time. The composition of Kentridge's (...)
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  28.  8
    Nate McCaughtry & Inez Rovegno (2001). Meaning and Movement: Exploring the Deep Connections to Education. Studies in Philosophy and Education 20 (6):489-505.
    Many in education suggest that to have studentsadopt healthy and active lifestyles, then theymust be offered meaning rich physical activityexperiences. This paper adds to thisconversation in two ways. First, this paperadds depth and richness to traditionalconceptualizations of the meaning in movement.In doing so, we interrogate the physical,cognitive and affective meaning that studentsmay derive from participation in movement.Second, this paper examines the role ofphysical activity in theme-based, integratedcurriculum. We highlight how physical activitycan be incorporated into theme-based units insubstantial and (...)
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  29.  21
    Paul Souriau (1983). The Aesthetics of Movement. University of Massachusetts Press.
    1 The Pleasure of Movement It is evident that the movements of an animal are determined above all by its organic structure. Each of its limbs, according to ...
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  30.  21
    Stephen M. Engel (2001). The Unfinished Revolution: Social Movement Theory and the Gay and Lesbian Movement. Cambridge University Press.
    The Unfinished Revolution compares the post-Second World War histories of the American and British gay and lesbian movements with an eye toward understanding how distinct political institutional environments affect the development, strategies, goals, and outcomes of a social movement. Stephen M. Engel utilizes an electic mix of source materials ranging from the theories of Mancur Olson and Michel Foucault to Supreme Court rulings and film and television dialogue. The two case study chapters function as brief historical sketches to elucidate (...)
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  31.  21
    Erin Manning (2009). Relationscapes: Movement, Art, Philosophy. MIT Press.
    Prelude -- What moves as a body returns as a movement of thought -- Introduction: Events of relation : concepts in the making -- Incipient action : the dance of the not-yet -- The elasticity of the almost -- A mover's guide to standing still -- Taking the next step -- Dancing the technogenetic body -- Perceptions in folding -- Grace taking form : Marey's movement machines -- Animation's dance -- From biopolitics to the biogram, or, how Leni (...)
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  32. Peggy J. Parks (2012). The Green Movement. Referencepoint Press.
    What is the green movement? -- How has the green movement influenced environmental policies? -- Do the benefits of going green outweigh the costs? -- What is the future of the green movement?
     
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  33. Jinting Wu & Mario Wenning (forthcoming). The Postsecular Turn in Education: Lessons From the Mindfulness Movement and the Revival of Confucian Academies. Studies in Philosophy and Education:1-21.
    It is part of a global trend today that new relationships are being forged between religion and society, between spirituality and materiality, giving rise to announcements that we live in a ‘postsecular’ or ‘desecularized’ world. Taking up two educational movements, the mindfulness movement in the West and the revival of Confucian education in China, this paper examines what and how postsecular orientations and sensibilities penetrate educational discourses and practices in different cultural contexts. We compare the two movements to reveal (...)
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  34. Maxine Sheets-Johnstone (2011). The Primacy of Movement. John Benjamins Pub..
    chapter 1 Neandertals Experience shows the problem of the mind cannot be solved by attacking the citadel itself. — the mind is function of body. ...
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  35.  16
    Paul M. Fitts (1954). The Information Capacity of the Human Motor System in Controlling the Amplitude of Movement. Journal of Experimental Psychology 47 (6):381.
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  36.  17
    Brian Massumi (2002). Parables for the Virtual: Movement, Affect, Sensation. Duke University Press.
    Replacing the traditional opposition of literal and figural with new distinctions between stasis and motion and between actual and virtual,Parables for the ...
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  37. Elizabeth B. Torres, Maria Brincker, Robert W. Isenhower, Polina Yanovich, Kimberly Stigler, John I. Nurnberger, Dimitri N. Metaxas & Jorge V. Jose (2013). Autism: The Micro-Movement Perspective. Frontiers Integrated Neuroscience 7 (32).
    The current assessment of behaviors in the inventories to diagnose autism spectrum disorders (ASD) focus on observation and discrete categorizations. Behaviors require movements, yet measurements of physical movements are seldom included. Their inclusion however, could provide an objective characterization of behavior to help unveil interactions between the peripheral and the central nervous systems. Such interactions are critical for the development and maintenance of spontaneous autonomy, self-regulation and voluntary control. At present, current approaches cannot deal with the heterogeneous, dynamic and stochastic (...)
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  38.  6
    P. E. Roland (1978). Sensory Feedback to the Cerebral Cortex During Voluntary Movement in Man. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 1 (1):129.
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  39. John Sutton (2012). Memory Before the Game: Switching Perspectives in Imagining and Remembering Sport and Movement. Journal of Mental Imagery 36 (1/2):85-95.
    This paper addresses relations between memory and imagery in expert sport in relation to visual or visuospatial perspective. Imagining, remembering, and moving potentially interact via related forms of episodic simulation, whether future- or past-directed. Sometimes I see myself engaged in action: many experts report switching between such external visual perspectives and an internal, 'own-eyes', or field perspective on their past or possible performance. Perspective in retrieval and in imagery may be flexible and multiple. I raise a range of topics for (...)
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  40.  9
    Nicole L. Wilson & Raymond W. Gibbs (2007). Real and Imagined Body Movement Primes Metaphor Comprehension. Cognitive Science 31 (4):721-731.
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  41.  11
    David Best (1978). Philosophy and Human Movement. Allen & Unwin.
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  42.  3
    Jeffrey M. Zacks (2004). Using Movement and Intentions to Understand Simple Events. Cognitive Science 28 (6):979-1008.
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  43.  4
    Lawrence E. Melamed, Michael Halay & Joseph W. Gildow (1973). Effect of External Target Presence on Visual Adaptation with Active and Passive Movement. Journal of Experimental Psychology 98 (1):125.
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  44.  2
    Alvin S. Bernstein, Kenneth Taylor, Buron G. Austen, Martin Nathanson & Anthony Scarpelli (1971). Orienting Response and Apparent Movement Toward or Away From the Observer. Journal of Experimental Psychology 87 (1):37.
  45.  11
    Ilan Golani (1992). A Mobility Gradient in the Organization of Vertebrate Movement: The Perception of Movement Through Symbolic Language. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 15 (2):249-266.
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  46. David Best (1974). Expression in Movement & the Arts: A Philosophical Enquiry. Lepus Books.
     
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  47.  16
    Katharine Schweitzer (2013). Making Feminist Sense of the Global Justice Movement. By Catherine Eschle and Bice Maiguashca Lanham., Md.: Rowman & Littlefield Publishers, Inc., 2010. [REVIEW] Hypatia 28 (2):388-390.
  48.  7
    F. P. Kilpatrick & W. H. Ittelson (1951). Three Demonstrations Involving the Visual Perception of Movement. Journal of Experimental Psychology 42 (6):394.
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  49.  6
    R. H. Day, T. S. Wong & Charles I. Brooks (1971). "Radial and Tangential Movement Directions as Determinants of the Haptic Illusion in an L Figure"/ "Frustration Considerations of the Small-Trials Partial Reinforcement Effect: Experience with Nonreward and Intertrial Reinforcement": Errata. Journal of Experimental Psychology 90 (2):344-344.
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  50.  3
    R. H. Day & T. S. Wong (1971). Radial and Tangential Movement Directions as Determinants of the Haptic Illusion in an L Figure. Journal of Experimental Psychology 87 (1):19.
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