Search results for 'Movement' (try it on Scholar)

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  1. Maxine Sheets-Johnstone (2012). From Movement to Dance. Phenomenology and the Cognitive Sciences 11 (1):39-57.score: 24.0
    This article begins with a summary phenomenological analysis of movement in conjunction with the question of “quality” in movement. It then specifies the particular kind of memory involved in a dancer’s memorization of a dance. On the basis of the phenomenological analysis and specification of memory, it proceeds to a clarification of meaning in dance. Taking its clue from the preceding sections, the concluding section of the article sets forth reasons why present-day cognitive science is unable to provide (...)
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  2. Renaud Barbaras (2008). Life, Movement, and Desire. Research in Phenomenology 38 (1):3-17.score: 24.0
    In French, the verb "to live" designates both being alive and the experience of something. This ambiguity has a philosophical meaning. The task of a phenomenology of life is to describe an originary sense of living from which the very distinction between life in the intransitive sense and life in the transitive, or intentional, sense proceeds. Hans Jonas is one of those rare authors who has tried to give an account of the specificity of life instead of reducing life to (...)
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  3. Tom Burke (2010). Empiricism, Pragmatism, and the Settlement Movement. The Pluralist 5 (3):73-88.score: 24.0
    This paper examines the settlement movement (a social reform movement during the Progressive Era, roughly 1890–1920) in order to illustrate what pragmatism is and is not. In 1906, Mary Kingsbury Simkhovitch proposed an analysis of settlement house methods. Because of her emphasis on interpretation and action, and because of the nature of the settlement movement as a social reform effort with vitally important consequences for everyone involved, it might be thought that her analysis would be pragmatist in (...)
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  4. Barbara Montero (2006). Proprioceiving Someone Else's Movement. Philosophical Explorations 9 (2):149 – 161.score: 24.0
    Proprioception - the sense by which we come to know the positions and movements of our bodies - is thought to be necessarily confined to the body of the perceiver. That is, it is thought that while proprioception can inform you as to whether your left knee is bent or straight, it cannot inform you as to whether someone else's knee is bent or straight. But while proprioception certainly provides us with information about the positions and movements of our own (...)
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  5. Pierre Pica (1981). Some Theoretical Implications of the Study of NP-Movement in Some Scandinavian Languages. In Thorstein Fretheim & Lars Hellan (eds.), Papers from the sixth Scandinavian Conference of Linguistics.score: 24.0
    We argue that there exist two kinds of passive structures, a) one generated in the base b) the other transformationally derived by the structure preserving-rule of move-NP. Assuming a Case theory along the lmines of Chomsky (1978), we want to argue a) that some oblique Cases are assigned in the base b) that NP movement can move an oblique Case assigned in the base c) that movement should not be defined in terms of Case but in terms of (...)
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  6. Claire L. Pouncey & Jonathan M. Lukens (2010). Madness Versus Badness: The Ethical Tension Between the Recovery Movement and Forensic Psychiatry. [REVIEW] Theoretical Medicine and Bioethics 31 (1):93-105.score: 24.0
    The mental health recovery movement promotes patient self-determination and opposes coercive psychiatric treatment. While it has made great strides towards these ends, its rhetoric impairs its political efficacy. We illustrate how psychiatry can share recovery values and yet appear to violate them. In certain criminal proceedings, for example, forensic psychiatrists routinely argue that persons with mental illness who have committed crimes are not full moral agents. Such arguments align with the recovery movement’s aim of providing appropriate treatment and (...)
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  7. Alba Papa-Grimaldi (2007). The Presumption of Movement. Axiomathes 17 (2):137-154.score: 24.0
    The conceptualisation of movement has always been problematical for Western thought, ever since Parmenides declared our incapacity to conceptualise the plurality of change because our self-identical thought can only know an identical being. Exploiting this peculiar feature and constraint on our thought, Zeno of Elea devised his famous paradoxes of movement in which he shows that the passage from a position to movement cannot be conceptualised. In this paper, I argue that this same constraint is at the (...)
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  8. Timothy Mooney (2011). Plasticity, Motor Intentionality and Concrete Movement in Merleau-Ponty. Continental Philosophy Review 44 (4):359-381.score: 24.0
    Merleau-Ponty’s explication of concrete or practical movement by way of the Schneider case could be read as ending up close to automatism, neglecting its flexibility and plasticity in the face of obstacles. It can be contended that he already goes off course in his explication of Schneider’s condition. Rasmus Jensen has argued that he assimilates a normal person’s motor intentionality to the patient’s, thereby generating a vacuity problem. I argue that Schneider’s difficulties with certain movements point to a means (...)
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  9. Frédérique Déjean, Stéphanie Giamporcaro, Jean-Pascal Gond, Bernard Leca & Elise Penalva-Icher (2013). Mistaking an Emerging Market for a Social Movement? A Comment on Arjaliès' Social-Movement Perspective on Socially Responsible Investment in France. Journal of Business Ethics 112 (2):205-212.score: 24.0
    In a recent contribution to this journal, Arjaliès (J Bus Ethics 92:57—78, 2010) suggests that the emergence of socially responsible investment (SRI) in France can be best described as a social movement with a collective identity that aimed to challenge the dominant logic of the financial market. Such an account is at odds with a body of empirical studies that approaches SRI in the French context as a process of market creation led by loosely coordinated actors with contradictory and (...)
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  10. Ana Delgado (2008). Opening Up for Participation in Agro-Biodiversity Conservation: The Expert-Lay Interplay in a Brazilian Social Movement. [REVIEW] Journal of Agricultural and Environmental Ethics 21 (6):559-577.score: 24.0
    In science and environmental studies, there is a general concern for the democratization of the expert-lay interplay. However, the democratization of expertise does not necessarily lead to more sustainable decisions. If citizens do not take the sustainable choice, what should experts and decision makers do? Should the expert-lay interplay be dissolved? In thinking about how to shape the expert-lay interplay in a better way in agro-biodiversity conservation, I take the case of the MST (Movimento Sem Terra/Landless People’s Movement), possibly (...)
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  11. Erik D. Reichle, Keith Rayner & Alexander Pollatsek (2003). The E-Z Reader Model of Eye-Movement Control in Reading: Comparisons to Other Models. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 26 (4):445-476.score: 24.0
    The E-Z Reader model (Reichle et al. 1998; 1999) provides a theoretical framework for understanding how word identification, visual processing, attention, and oculomotor control jointly determine when and where the eyes move during reading. In this article, we first review what is known about eye movements during reading. Then we provide an updated version of the model (E-Z Reader 7) and describe how it accounts for basic findings about eye movement control in reading. We then review several alternative models (...)
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  12. Luc K. Audebrand & Thierry C. Pauchant (2009). Can the Fair Trade Movement Enrich Traditional Business Ethics? An Historical Study of its Founders in Mexico. Journal of Business Ethics 87 (3):343 - 353.score: 24.0
    As the need for more diversity in business ethics is becoming more pressing in our global world, we provide an historical study of a Fair Trade (FT) movement, born in rural Mexico. We first focus on the basic assumptions of its founders, which include a worker–priest, Frans van der Hoff, a group of native Indians and local farmers who formed a cooperative, and an NGO, Max Havelaar. We then review both the originalities and challenges of the FT movement (...)
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  13. Stephen M. Engel (2001). The Unfinished Revolution: Social Movement Theory and the Gay and Lesbian Movement. Cambridge University Press.score: 24.0
    The Unfinished Revolution compares the post-Second World War histories of the American and British gay and lesbian movements with an eye toward understanding how distinct political institutional environments affect the development, strategies, goals, and outcomes of a social movement. Stephen M. Engel utilizes an electic mix of source materials ranging from the theories of Mancur Olson and Michel Foucault to Supreme Court rulings and film and television dialogue. The two case study chapters function as brief historical sketches to elucidate (...)
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  14. Paul Souriau (1983). The Aesthetics of Movement. University of Massachusetts Press.score: 24.0
    1 The Pleasure of Movement It is evident that the movements of an animal are determined above all by its organic structure. Each of its limbs, according to ...
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  15. Brenda L. Connors, Richard Rende & Timothy J. Colton (2013). Predicting Individual Differences in Decision-Making Process From Signature Movement Styles: An Illustrative Study of Leaders. Frontiers in Psychology 4.score: 24.0
    There has been a surge of interest in examining the utility of methods for capturing individual differences in decision-making style. We illustrate the potential offered by Movement Pattern Analysis (MPA), an observational methodology that has been used in business and by the U.S. Department of Defense to record body movements that provide predictive insight into individual differences in decision-making motivations and actions. Twelve military officers participated in an intensive two-hour interview that permitted detailed and fine-grained observation and coding of (...)
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  16. Erin Manning (2009). Relationscapes: Movement, Art, Philosophy. Mit Press.score: 24.0
    Prelude -- What moves as a body returns as a movement of thought -- Introduction: Events of relation : concepts in the making -- Incipient action : the dance of the not-yet -- The elasticity of the almost -- A mover's guide to standing still -- Taking the next step -- Dancing the technogenetic body -- Perceptions in folding -- Grace taking form : Marey's movement machines -- Animation's dance -- From biopolitics to the biogram, or, how Leni (...)
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  17. David Morris (2005). What is Living and What is Non-Living in Merleau-Ponty's Philosophy of Movement and Expression. Chiasmi International 7:225-238.score: 24.0
    In ancient philosophy life has priority: non-living matter is made intelligible by living activity. The modern evolutionary synthesis reverses this priority: life is a passive result of blind, non-living material processes. But recent work in science and philosophy puts that reversal in question, by emphasizing how living beings are self-organizing and active. “Naturalizing” this new emphasis on living activity requires not simply a return to ancient philosophy but a new ontology, a new concept of nature. To explore that ontology, I (...)
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  18. Rudolph Bauer (2011). Awareness and Movement in Dzogchen. Transmission 2.score: 24.0
    This paper focuses on awareness and movement in dzogchen.
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  19. Marc Lavine (2009). From Scholarly Dialogue to Social Movement: Considerations and Implications for Peace Through Commerce. [REVIEW] Journal of Business Ethics 89 (4):603 - 615.score: 24.0
    While Peace through Commerce (PTC) started as a conversation among a small group of scholars it has grown into an increasingly robust movement, giving rise to conferences, books, journal articles, and dialogue between scholars, managers, practitioners, government officials, and civil society actors, all of whom share an interest in the potential of commerce to foster greater peace. Because social movement scholarship explores the ability of collective interests to achieve social change it provides a useful lens through which to (...)
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  20. Samantha Noll (2014). Liberalism and the Two Directions of the Local Food Movement. Journal of Agricultural and Environmental Ethics 27 (2):211-224.score: 24.0
    The local food movement is, increasingly, becoming a part of the modern American landscape. However, while it appears that the local food movement is gaining momentum, one could question whether or not this trend is, in fact, politically and socially sustainable. Is local food just another trend that will fade away or is it here to stay? One way to begin addressing this question is to ascertain whether or not it is compatible with liberalism, a set of influential (...)
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  21. Alexander Klippel (2011). Movement Choremes: Bridging Cognitive Understanding and Formal Characterizations of Movement Patterns1. Topics in Cognitive Science 3 (4):722-740.score: 24.0
    This article discusses an approach to characterizing movement patterns (paths/trajectories) of individual agents that allows for relating aspects of cognitive conceptualization of movement patterns with formal spatial characterizations. To this end, we adopt a perspective of characterizing movement patterns on the basis of perceptual and conceptual invariants that we term movement choremes (MCs). MCs are formally grounded by behaviorally validating qualitative spatio-temporal calculi. Relating perceptual and cognitive aspects of space and formal theories of spatial information has (...)
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  22. Nate McCaughtry & Inez Rovegno (2001). Meaning and Movement: Exploring the Deep Connections to Education. Studies in Philosophy and Education 20 (6):489-505.score: 24.0
    Many in education suggest that to have studentsadopt healthy and active lifestyles, then theymust be offered meaning rich physical activityexperiences. This paper adds to thisconversation in two ways. First, this paperadds depth and richness to traditionalconceptualizations of the meaning in movement.In doing so, we interrogate the physical,cognitive and affective meaning that studentsmay derive from participation in movement.Second, this paper examines the role ofphysical activity in theme-based, integratedcurriculum. We highlight how physical activitycan be incorporated into theme-based units insubstantial and (...)
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  23. Sukhvinder S. Obhi (2012). The Amazing Capacity to Read Intentions From Movement Kinematics. Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 6.score: 24.0
    The Amazing Capacity to Read Intentions from Movement Kinematics.
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  24. Martina Rieger Andrea M. Walter (2012). Similar Mechanisms of Movement Control in Target- and Effect-Directed Actions Toward Spatial Goals? Frontiers in Psychology 3.score: 24.0
    Previous research has shown that actions conducted towards temporal targets and temporal effects are controlled in a similar way. To investigate whether these findings also apply to spatially restricted movements we analyzed movement kinematics of continuous-reversal movements towards given spatial targets and towards self-produced spatial effects in two experiments. In Experiment 1 target- and effect-directed movements were investigated in three different goal constellations. A spatial target/effect was always presented/produced on one movement side, on the other side either a) (...)
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  25. Tristan A. Bekinschtein, Facundo F. Manes, Mirta Villarreal, Adrian M. Owen & Valeria Della Maggiore (2011). Functional Imaging Reveals Movement Preparatory Activity in the Vegetative State. Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 5:5.score: 24.0
    The Vegetative State (VS) is characterized by the absence of awareness of self or the environment and preserved autonomic functions. The diagnosis relies critically on the lack of consistent signs of purposeful behavior in response to external stimulation. Yet, given that patients with disorders of consciousness often exhibit fragmented movement patterns, voluntary actions may go unnoticed. Here we designed a simple motor paradigm that could potentially detect residual conscious awareness in VS patients with mild to severe brain damage by (...)
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  26. Johannes B. J. Bussmann (2013). One Plus One Equals Three (or More …): Combining the Assessment of Movement Behavior and Subjective States in Everyday Life. Frontiers in Psychology 4.score: 24.0
    One plus one equals three (or more …): combining the assessment of movement behavior and subjective states in everyday life.
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  27. Peter Praamstra Christian J. Rawle, R. Chris Miall (2012). Frontoparietal Theta Activity Supports Behavioral Decisions in Movement-Target Selection. Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 6.score: 24.0
    There is recent EEG evidence describing task-related changes of theta power in spatial attention and reaching/pointing tasks. Here, we aim to better characterize this theta activity and determine whether it is associated with visuospatial memory or with visuospatial selection functions of the frontoparietal cortex. We recorded EEG from 20 participants during a movement precuing task with centre-out joystick movements. Precues displayed 1, 2, or 4 potential targets and were followed (SOA 1.2 s) by a central response cue indicating the (...)
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  28. David H. Fleming (2013). Charcoal Matter with Memory: Images of Movement, Time and Duration in the Animated Films of William Kentridge. Film-Philosophy 17 (1):402-423.score: 24.0
    In his temporal philosophy based on the writing of Henri Bergson, Gilles Deleuze describes duration ( durée ) as a becoming that endures in time. Reifications of this complex philosophical concept become artistically expressed, I argue, in the form and content of South African artist William Kentridge's series of 'charcoal drawings for projection.' These exhibited art works provide intriguing and illuminating 'philosophical' examples of animated audio-visual media, which expressively plicate distinct images of movement and time. The composition of Kentridge's (...)
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  29. Georgiana Juravle, Francis McGlone & Charles Spence (2013). Context-Dependent Changes in Tactile Perception During Movement Execution. Frontiers in Psychology 4:913.score: 24.0
    Tactile perception is inhibited during movement execution, a phenomenon known as tactile suppression. Here, we investigated whether the type of movement determines whether or not this form of sensory suppression occurs. Participants performed simple reaching or exploratory movements. Tactile discrimination thresholds were calculated for vibratory stimuli delivered to participants’ wrists while executing the movement, and while at rest (a tactile discrimination task, TD). We also measured discrimination performance in a same vs. different task for the explored materials (...)
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  30. L. Riggs, D. A. McQuiggan, A. K. Anderson & J. D. Ryan (2009). Eye Movement Monitoring Reveals Differential Influences of Emotion on Memory. Frontiers in Psychology 1:205-205.score: 24.0
    Research shows that memory for emotional aspects of an event may be enhanced at the cost of impaired memory for surrounding peripheral details. However, this has only been assessed directly via verbal reports which reveal the outcome of a long stream of processing but cannot shed light on how/when emotion may affect the retrieval process. In the present experiment, eye movement monitoring was used as an indirect measure of memory as it can reveal aspects of online memory processing. For (...)
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  31. Ricarda I. Schubotz Anne-Marike Schiffer (2011). Caudate Nucleus Signals for Breaches of Expectation in a Movement Observation Paradigm. Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 5.score: 24.0
    The striatum has been established as a carrier of reward related prediction errors. This prediction error signal concerns the difference between how much reward was predicted and how much reward is gained. However, it remains to be established whether general breaches of expectation, i.e. perceptual prediction errors, are also implemented in the striatum. The current study used functional Magnetic Resonance imaging (fMRI) to investigate the role of caudate nucleus in breaches of expectation. Importantly, breaches were not related to the occurrence (...)
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  32. Laura B. DeLind (2011). Are Local Food and the Local Food Movement Taking Us Where We Want to Go? Or Are We Hitching Our Wagons to the Wrong Stars? Agriculture and Human Values 28 (2):273-283.score: 24.0
    Much is being made of local food. It is at once a social movement, a diet, and an economic strategy—a popular solution—to a global food system in great distress. Yet, despite its popularity or perhaps because of it, local food (especially in the US) is also something of a chimera if not a tool of the status quo. This paper reflects on and contrasts aspects of current local food rhetoric with Dalhberg’s notion of a regenerative food system. It identifies (...)
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  33. Elena Guerzoni (2006). Intervention Effects on NPIs and Feature Movement: Towards a Unified Account of Intervention. [REVIEW] Natural Language Semantics 14 (4):359-398.score: 24.0
    In this paper, I explore the possibility of understanding locality restrictions on the distribution of Negative Polarity Items (NPIs) as a consequence of covert movement. The present proposal restates Linebarger’s Immediate Scope Constraint in terms of morphology-driven checking requirements. These requirements cannot be met if a blocking element intervenes between the NPI feature and its morphosemantic licenser at Logical Form (LF). The empirical generalization is that the class of NPI ‘blocking expressions’ (a.k.a. ‘interveners’) overlaps to a large extent with (...)
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  34. Aya Hirata Kimura & Mima Nishiyama (2008). The Chisan-Chisho Movement: Japanese Local Food Movement and its Challenges. [REVIEW] Agriculture and Human Values 25 (1):49-64.score: 24.0
    This paper examines the increasingly popular chisan-chisho movement that has promoted the localization of food consumption in Japan since the late-1990s. Chisan-chisho emerged in the context of a perceived crisis in the Japanese food system, particularly the long-term decline of agriculture and rural community and more recent episodes of food scandals. Although initially started as a grassroots movement, many chisan-chisho initiatives are now organized by governments and farmers’ cooperatives. Acknowledging that the chisan-chisho movement has added some important (...)
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  35. Harold Bekkering Sasha Ondobaka (2012). Hierarchy of Idea-Guided Action and Perception-Guided Movement. Frontiers in Psychology 3.score: 24.0
    The ideomotor theory of voluntary behavior assumes that the selection and control of a concrete goal-directed movement depends on imagining its direct perceptual consequences. However, this perception-guided assumption neglects the fact that behavioral control entails a hierarchical mechanism wherein conceptual expectations - action goals - can modulate lower level perceptuo-motor representations. In this paper, we focus on the hierarchical nature of voluntary behavior by distinguishing between perceptual representations of images that relate to attainment of concrete movement goals and (...)
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  36. Julius Verrel, Steven Pologe, Wayne Manselle, Ulman Lindenberger & Marjorie Woollacott (2013). Exploiting Biomechanical Degrees of Freedom for Fast and Accurate Changes in Movement Direction: Coordination Underlying Quick Bow Reversals During Continuous Cello Bowing. Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 7.score: 24.0
    Theoretical and empirical evidence suggests that accurate and efficient motor performance may be achieved by task-specific exploitation of biomechanical degrees of freedom. We investigate coordination of the right arm in a task requiring a sudden yet precisely controlled reversal of movement direction: bow reversals during continuous (“legato”) tone production on a stringed instrument. Ten advanced or professional cello players (at least ten years of practice) and ten age-matched novice players took part in the study. Kinematic data from the bow (...)
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  37. A. Guillot C. Collet, F. Di Rienzo, N. El Hoyek (2013). Autonomic Nervous System Correlates in Movement Observation and Motor Imagery. Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 7.score: 24.0
    The purpose of the current article is to provide a comprehensive overview of the literature offering a better understanding on the autonomic nervous system (ANS) correlates in motor imagery (MI) and movement observation. These are two high brain functions involving sensori-motor coupling, mediated by memory systems. How observing or mentally rehearsing a movement affect ANS activity has not been extensively investigated. The links between cognitive functions and ANS responses are not so obvious. We first describe the organization of (...)
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  38. Hermann Müller Lisa K. Pendt, Heiko Maurer (2012). The Influence of Movement Initiation Deficits on the Quantification of Retention in Parkinson's Disease. Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 6.score: 24.0
    In patients with an impaired motor system, like Parkinson’s disease (PD), deficits in motor learning are expected and results of various studies seem to confirm these expectations. However, most studies in this regard are behaviorally based and quantify learning by performance changes between at least two points in time, e.g. baseline and retention. But, performance in a retention test is also dependent on other factors than learning. Especially in patients, the functional capacity of the control system might be altered unspecific (...)
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  39. Peggy J. Parks (2012). The Green Movement. Referencepoint Press.score: 24.0
    What is the green movement? -- How has the green movement influenced environmental policies? -- Do the benefits of going green outweigh the costs? -- What is the future of the green movement?
     
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  40. Lei Wang, Christine Sutter, Ronald Josef Zvonimir Dangel, Jochen Musseler & Catherine Disselhorst-Klug (2012). Perceiving One's Own Limb Movements with Conflicting Sensory Feedback: The Role of Mode of Movement Control and Age. Frontiers in Psychology 3.score: 24.0
    Previous studies have demonstrated a great uncertainty in evaluating one's own voluntary actions when visual feedback is suspended. We now compare these limitations in younger and older adults during active or passive limb movements. Participants put their dominant hand on a robot arm and performed movements actively or the relaxed limb was moved passively. Either a distorted visual feedback or no visual feedback at all was provided during the movement. Perception of limb movements was attenuated through visual feedback. This (...)
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  41. Maxine Sheets-Johnstone (2011). The Primacy of Movement. John Benjamins Pub..score: 21.0
    chapter 1 Neandertals Experience shows the problem of the mind cannot be solved by attacking the citadel itself. — the mind is function of body. ...
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  42. John Sutton (2012). Memory Before the Game: Switching Perspectives in Imagining and Remembering Sport and Movement. Journal of Mental Imagery 36 (1/2):85-95.score: 21.0
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  43. Katharine Schweitzer (2013). Making Feminist Sense of the Global Justice Movement. By Catherine Eschle and Bice Maiguashca Lanham., Md.: Rowman & Littlefield Publishers, Inc., 2010. [REVIEW] Hypatia 28 (2):388-390.score: 21.0
  44. Paul M. Fitts (1954). The Information Capacity of the Human Motor System in Controlling the Amplitude of Movement. Journal of Experimental Psychology 47 (6):381.score: 21.0
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  45. Scot Danforth (2011). Romantic Agrarianism and Movement Education in the United States: Examining the Discursive Politics of Learning Disability Science. Educational Philosophy and Theory 43 (6):636-651.score: 21.0
    The learning disability construct gained scientific and political legitimacy in the United States in the 1960s as an explanation for some forms of childhood learning difficulties. In 1975, federal law incorporated learning disability into the categorical system of special education. The historical and scientific roots of the disorder involved a neuropsychological discourse that often conflated lower social class identity and learning disability. Lower class, often urban, families were viewed as providing insufficient intellectual stimulation for their young children, thereby causing learning (...)
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  46. Kenn Kassman (1997). Envisioning Ecotopia: The U.S. Green Movement and the Politics of Radical Social Change. Praeger.score: 21.0
    Drawing on his experience as an activist, Kenn Kassman explains the distinctions between the three elements, which he terms Neo-Primitivism, Mystical Deep ...
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  47. Brian Massumi (2002). Parables for the Virtual: Movement, Affect, Sensation. Duke University Press.score: 21.0
    Replacing the traditional opposition of literal and figural with new distinctions between stasis and motion and between actual and virtual,Parables for the ...
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  48. Harold E. Burtt (1917). Auditory Illusions of Movement - A Preliminary Study. Journal of Experimental Psychology 2 (1):63-75.score: 21.0
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  49. Marybeth Grant-Beuttler, Laura M. Glynn, Amy L. Salisbury, Elysia Poggi Davis, Carol Holliday & Curt A. Sandman (2011). Development of Fetal Movement Between 26 and 36-Weeks' Gestation in Response to Vibro-Acoustic Stimulation. Frontiers in Psychology 2:350-350.score: 21.0
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  50. R. F. McConnell (1927). Visual Movement Under Simultaneous Excitations with Initial and Terminal Overlap. Journal of Experimental Psychology 10 (3):227.score: 21.0
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