Search results for 'Mrinal Kanti Gangopadhyay' (try it on Scholar)

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  1. Mrinal Kanti Gangopadhyay (1971). The Concept of Upādhi in Nyāya Logic. Journal of Indian Philosophy 1 (2):146-166.score: 870.0
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  2. Mrinal Kanti Gangopadhyay (2006). Vyapti: Bauddha and Jaina Views. In Pranab Kumar Sen & Prabal Kumar Sen (eds.), Philosophical Concepts Relevant to Sciences in Indian Tradition. Distributed by Motilal Banarsidass. 309.score: 870.0
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  3. Riccardo Fusaroli, Nivedita Gangopadhyay & Kristian Tylén (2013). The Dialogically Extended Mind: Language as Skilful Intersubjective Engagement. Cognitive Systems Research.score: 30.0
    A growing conceptual and empirical literature is advancing the idea that language extends our cognitive skills. One of the most influential positions holds that language – qua material symbols – facilitates individual thought processes by virtue of its material properties (Clark, 2006a). Extending upon this model, we argue that language enhances our cognitive capabilities in a much more radical way: the skilful engagement of public material symbols facilitates evolutionarily unprecedented modes of collective perception, action and reasoning (interpersonal synergies) creating dialogically (...)
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  4. Nivedita Gangopadhyay (2011). The Extended Mind: Born to Be Wild? A Lesson From Action-Understanding. [REVIEW] Phenomenology and the Cognitive Sciences 10 (3):377-397.score: 30.0
    The extended mind hypothesis (Clark and Chalmers in Analysis 58(1):7–19, 1998; Clark 2008) is an influential hypothesis in philosophy of mind and cognitive science. I argue that the extended mind hypothesis is born to be wild. It has undeniable and irrepressible tendencies of flouting grounding assumptions of the traditional information-processing paradigm. I present case-studies from social cognition which not only support the extended mind proposal but also bring out its inherent wildness. In particular, I focus on cases of action-understanding and (...)
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  5. Nivedita Gangopadhyay & Julian Kiverstein (2009). Enactivism and the Unity of Perception and Action. Topoi 28 (1):63-73.score: 30.0
    This paper contrasts two enactive theories of visual experience: the sensorimotor theory (O’Regan and Noë, Behav Brain Sci 24(5):939–1031, 2001; Noë and O’Regan, Vision and mind, 2002; Noë, Action in perception, 2004) and Susan Hurley’s (Consciousness in action, 1998, Synthese 129:3–40, 2001) theory of active perception. We criticise the sensorimotor theory for its commitment to a distinction between mere sensorimotor behaviour and cognition. This is a distinction that is firmly rejected by Hurley. Hurley argues that personal level cognitive abilities emerge (...)
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  6. N. Gangopadhyay & L. Schilbach (2011). Seeing Minds: A Neurophilosophical Investigation of the Role of Perception-Action Coupling in Social Perception. Social Neuroscience.score: 30.0
    This paper proposes an empirical hypothesis that in some cases of social interaction we have an immediate perceptual access to others' minds in the perception of their embodied intentionality. Our point of departure is the phenomenological insight that there is an experiential difference in the perception of embodied intentionality and the perception of non-intentionality. The other's embodied intentionality is perceptually given in a way that is different from the givenness of non-intentionality. We claim that the phenomenological difference in the perception (...)
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  7. Nivedita Gangopadhyay, Michael Madary & Finn Spicer (eds.) (2010). Perception, Action, and Consciousness: Sensorimotor Dynamics and Two Visual Systems. Oxford University Press, Usa.score: 30.0
    Machine generated contents note: -- 1. Introduction -- Consciousness and Sensorimotor Dynamics: Methodological Issues -- 2. Computational consciousness, D. Ballard -- 3. Explaining what people say about sensory qualia, J. Kevin O'Regan -- 4. Perception, action, and experience: unraveling the golden braid, A. Clark -- The Two-Visual Systems Hypothesis -- 5. Cortical visual systems for perception and action, A.D. Milner and M.A. Goodale -- 6. Hermann Lotze's Theory of 'Local Sign': evidence from pointing responses in an illusory figure, (...)
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  8. N. Gangopadhyay (2011). Alvin I. Goldman * Simulating Minds: The Philosophy, Psychology and Neuroscience of Mindreading. British Journal for the Philosophy of Science 62 (2):437-441.score: 30.0
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  9. N. Gangopadhyay (2010). Experiential Blindness Revisited: In Defense of a Case of Embodied Cognition. Cognitive Systems Research 11:396-407.score: 30.0
    The sensorimotor theory (Noe¨, 2004, in press) discusses a special instance of lack of perceptual experience despite no sensory impairment. The phenomenon dubbed “experiential blindness” is cited as evidence for a constitutive relation between sensorimotor skills and perceptual experience. Recently it has been objected (Adams & Aizawa, 2008; Aizawa, 2007) that the cases described by Noe¨ as experiential blindness are cases of pure sensory deficit. This paper argues that while the objections bring out limitations of Noe¨’s sensorimotor theory they do (...)
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  10. Vivian Bohl & Nivedita Gangopadhyay (2013). Theory of Mind and the Unobservability of Other Minds. Philosophical Explorations (2):1-20.score: 30.0
    The theory of mind (ToM) framework has been criticised by emerging alternative accounts. Each alternative begins with the accusation that ToM's validity as a research paradigm rests on the assumption of the ‘unobservability’ of other minds. We argue that the critics' discussion of the unobservability assumption (UA) targets a straw man. We discuss metaphysical, phenomenological, epistemological, and psychological readings of UA and demonstrate that it is not the case that ToM assumes the metaphysical, phenomenological, or epistemological claims. However, ToM supports (...)
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  11. Nivedita Gangopadhyay (2014). Introduction: Embodiment and Empathy, Current Debates in Social Cognition. Topoi 33 (1):117-127.score: 30.0
    This special issue targets two topics in social cognition that appear to increasingly structure the nature of interdisciplinary discourse but are themselves not very well understood. These are the notions of empathy and embodiment. Both have a history rooted in phenomenological philosophy and both have found extensive application in contemporary interdisciplinary theories of social cognition, at times to establish claims that are arguably contrary to the ones made by the phenomenologists credited with giving us these notions. But this special issue (...)
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  12. Jonathan T. Delafield-Butt & Nivedita Gangopadhyay (2013). Sensorimotor Intentionality. Developmental Review 33 (4):399-425.score: 30.0
    Efficient prospective motor control, evident in human activity from birth, reveals an adaptive intentionality of a primary, pre-reflective, and pre-conceptual nature that we identify here as sensorimotor intentionality. We identify a structural continuity between the emergence of this earliest form of prospective movement and the structure of mental states as intentional or content-directed in more advanced forms. We base our proposal on motor control studies, from foetal observations through infancy. These studies reveal movements are guided by anticipations of future effects, (...)
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  13. Nivedita Gangopadhyay & Katsunori Miyahara (2014). Perception and the Problem of Access to Other Minds. Philosophical Psychology:1-20.score: 30.0
    In opposition to mainstream theory of mind approaches, some contemporary perceptual accounts of social cognition do not consider the central question of social cognition to be the problem of access to other minds. These perceptual accounts draw heavily on phenomenological philosophy and propose that others' mental states are “directly” given in the perception of the others' expressive behavior. Furthermore, these accounts contend that phenomenological insights into the nature of social perception lead to the dissolution of the access problem. We argue, (...)
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  14. Partha Gangopadhyay (2000). On the Coase Theorem and Coalitional Stability: The Principle of Equal Relative Concession. Theory and Decision 48 (2):179-191.score: 30.0
    The Coase theorem is argued to be incompatible with bargaining set stability due to a tension between the grand coalition and sub-coalitions. We provide a counter-intuitive argument to demonstrate that the Coase theorem may be in complete consonance with bargaining set stability. We establish that an uncertainty concerning the formation of sub-coalitions will explain such compatibility: each agent fears that others may `gang up' against him and this fear forces the agents to negotiate. The grand coalition emerges from the negotiations (...)
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  15. Mrinalkanti Gangopadhyay (1975). Gange?A on Vy?Ptigraha the Means for the Ascertainment of Invariable Concomitance. Journal of Indian Philosophy 3 (1-2):167-208.score: 30.0
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  16. Biswatosh Saha & Shubhashis Gangopadhyay (2007). Building a Pedagogy Around Action and Emotion: Experiences of Blind Opera of Kolkata. [REVIEW] AI and Society 21 (1-2):57-71.score: 30.0
    Contemporary knowledge systems have given too much importance to visual symbols, the written word for instance, as the repository of knowledge. The primacy of the written word and the representational world built around it is, however, under debate—especially from recent insights derived from cognitive science that seeks to bring back action, intent and emotion within the core of cognitive science (Freeman and Nunez in J Consciousness Stud 6(11/12), 1999). It is being argued that other sensory experiences, apart from the visual, (...)
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  17. M. K. Gangopadhyay (1992). Causality in Indian Philosophy: A Brief Survey. In V. N. Jha (ed.), Relations in Indian Philosophy. Sri Satguru Publications. 147--121.score: 30.0
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  18. N. Gangopadhyay, M. Madary & F. Spicer (2010). Perception, Action. In N. Gangopadhay, M. Madary & F. Spicer (eds.), Perception, Action, and Consciousness. Oxford University Press. 1.score: 30.0
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  19. Mrinal Kanti Bhadra (1978). A Critical Study of Sartre's Ontology of Consciousness. University of Burdwan.score: 28.0
     
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  20. Ellen Fridland (2013). Nivedita Gangopadhyay, Michael Madary, and Finn Spencer (Eds.), Perception, Action, and Consciousness: Sensorimotor Dynamics and the Two Visual Systems. Phenomenology and the Cognitive Sciences 12 (4):899-906.score: 15.0
  21. K. C. Pandey (forthcoming). Review of Dharma: The Categorial Imperative, Edited by Ashok Vohra, Arvind Sharma and Mrinal Miri. [REVIEW] Sophia:1-2.score: 15.0
    The anthology Dharma: The Categorial ImperativeThe choice of using ‘the categorial imperative’ over the standard ‘the categorical imperative’ has not been supported with reason in the anthology, notwithstanding its mentioning of Kant. consists of a brief introduction and 18 essays which were presented in an international conference of the same title in 1997, with the purpose to provide an alternative interpretation of the concept ‘dharma’ while taking into view the influence of Western notion of religion and treating it as an (...)
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  22. Nóra Szegedi (2007). A Magában Való Dolog Fenomenológiája: Egy Klasszikus Kanti Probléma Husserl Transzcendentális Fenomenológiájának Perspektívájából. L' Harmattan.score: 15.0
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  23. Mrinal Miri (1973). Memory and Personal Identity. Mind 82 (January):1-21.score: 3.0
  24. Kanti Lal Das & Anirban Mukherjee (eds.) (2008). Language and Ontology. Northern Book Centre.score: 3.0
    The book highlights the concept of ontology, relationship between language and ontology, the distinction between ontology and reality, the role of linguistic ...
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  25. Mrinal Miri (1984). On Knowing Another Person. Journal of Value Inquiry 18 (1):3-12.score: 3.0
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  26. Mrinal Miri (1974). Self-Deception. Philosophy and Phenomenological Research 34 (4):576-585.score: 3.0
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  27. Mrinal Miri (1973). Persons and Their Bodies. Philosophical Studies 24 (6):407 - 411.score: 3.0
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  28. Jānakīnātha Kaula, N. B. Patil & Mrinal Kaul (eds.) (2003). The Variegated Plumage: Encounters with Indian Philosophy: A Commemoration Volume in Honour of Pandit Jankinath Kaul "Kamal". Sant Samagam Research Institute and Motilal Banarsidass Publishers, Delhi.score: 3.0
    The present volume adequately covers different aspects of Indian Philosophy and culture. The extensive section will provide impetus to further research in the subject.
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  29. Mehmet Bac & Parimal Kanti Bag (2002). Committee Decisions with Partisans and Side-Transfers. Theory and Decision 52 (3):267-286.score: 3.0
    A dichotomous decision-making context in committees is considered where potential partisan members with predetermined votes can generate inefficient decisions and buy neutral votes. The optimal voting rule minimizing the expected costs of inefficient decisions for the case of a three-member committee is analyzed. It is shown that the optimal voting rule can be non-monotonic with respect to side-transfers: in the symmetric case, majority voting is optimal under either zero, mild or full side-transfer possibilities, whereas unanimity voting may be optimal under (...)
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  30. Kanti Lal Das & Jyotish Chandra Basak (eds.) (2006). Language and Reality. Northern Book Centre.score: 3.0
    All the contributors of this Volume have discussed at length the relation between Language and Reality from the Eastern as well as Western perspectives.
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  31. Nusha Yamina Choudhury, Alak Paul & Bimal Kanti Paul (2004). Impact of Costal Embankment on the Flash Flood in Bangladesh: A Case Study. In Antoine Bailly & Lay James Gibson (eds.), Applied Geography. Kluwer Academic Publishers. 241-258.score: 3.0
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  32. Kanti Chandra Pandey & Kingsley Widmer (1962). Letters Pro and Con. Journal of Aesthetics and Art Criticism 20 (3):321.score: 3.0
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  33. Mehmet Bac & Parimal Kanti Bag (2002). Committee Decisions with Partisans and Side-Transfers. Theory and Decision 52 (3):267-286.score: 3.0
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  34. Tushar Kanti Bhattacharya (1994). Samavāya and the Nyāya-Vaiśeṣika Realism. Sanskrit Pustak Bhandar.score: 3.0
     
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  35. Sisir Kanti Bhattacharjee (1965). The Lawgiver of Machiavelli. Calcutta, Bookland.score: 3.0
     
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  36. Kṣetreśacandra Caṭṭopādhyāya, Lakshmīnārāyaṇa Tivārī, Ramāsaṅkara Miśra & Aśoka Kānti Cakravartī (eds.) (2008). Paṇḍita Śrī Kṣetreśacandra Caṭṭopādhyāya Smr̥ti-Grantha. Sampūrṇānanda Saṃskr̥ta Viśvavidyālaya.score: 3.0
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  37. S. R. Saha J. N. Mohanty, Tushar Kanti Sarkar Amita Chatterjee & Sibajiban Bhattacharyya (2008). Indian Logic. In Leila Haaparanta (ed.), The Development of Modern Logic. Oxford University Press.score: 3.0
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  38. Mrinal Miri (2010). In Appreciation. In J. Sharma A. Raguramaraju (ed.), Grounding Morality. Routledge. 347.score: 3.0
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  39. Mrinal Miri (ed.) (2003). Identity and the Moral Life. Oxford University Press.score: 3.0
    In this collection of essays written over thirty years, Miri, drawing on both Western and Indian traditions, provides fresh insight into some fundamental philosophical concerns--morality, modernity, individual and group identity, rationality, and violence in politics.
     
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  40. Mrinal Miri (1990). Kant's'refutation of Idealism'. In Margaret Chatterjee (ed.), The Philosophy of Nikunja Vihari Banerjee. Indian Council of Philosophical Research in Association with Munshiram Manoharlal Publishers. 83.score: 3.0
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  41. Mrinal Miri (1982). Logic, Ontology and Action. Atlantic Highlands: Humanities Press.score: 3.0
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  42. Mrinal Miri (1982). Mental States. In Logic, Ontology and Action. Atlantic Highlands: Humanities Press.score: 3.0
     
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  43. Mrinal Miri (1980). What is a Person. Distributors, Jain Book Depot.score: 3.0
     
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  44. J. N. Mohanty, S. R. Saha, Amita Chatterjee, Tushar Kanti Sarkar & Sibajiban Bhattacharyya (2008). Indian Logic. In Leila Haaparanta (ed.), The Development of Modern Logic. Oxford University Press.score: 3.0
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  45. Kanti Pakrasi & Ajit Halder (1971). Sex Ratios and Sex Sequences of Births in India. Journal of Biosocial Science 3 (4):377-387.score: 3.0
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  46. Kanti Chandra Pandey (1963). Abhinavagupta. Varanasi, Chowkhamba Sanskrit Series Office.score: 3.0
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  47. Kanti Chandra Pandey (1954/1986). An Outline of History of Śaiva Philosophy. Motilal Banarsidass.score: 3.0
     
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  48. Kanti Chandra Pandey (1959). Comparative Aesthetics. Varanasi, Chowkhamba Sanskrit Series Office.score: 3.0
    v. 1. Indian aesthetics.--v. 2. Western aesthetics.
     
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  49. Pankoj Kanti Sarkar (2012). Environmental Ethics and Environmental Issues. Environmental Ethics 1 (2).score: 3.0
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  50. Ashok Vohra, Arvind Sharma & Mrinal Miri (eds.) (2005). Dharma, the Categorial Imperative. D.K. Printworld.score: 3.0
     
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