Search results for 'Muḥammad Ghazālī' (try it on Scholar)

584 found
Sort by:
  1. Muḥammad Ghazālī (2004). Muslim Character: An American-English Translation of Muhammad Al-Ghazali's Khuluq Al-Muslim. Library of Islam.score: 960.0
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  2. Sher Muhammad (2008). Speeches From the Annual Gathering of the Movement. Ahmadiyya Anjuman Ishāʻat-E-Islam.score: 60.0
    'O men, serve your Lord who created you and those before you, so that you may guard against evil. Deals with Allah, Prophet Muhammad PBUH, Hazrat Mirza Ghulam Ahmad Sahib -- What are the signs of the appearance of the promised messiah? and do these signs appear in the being of Hazrat Mirza Sahib?
    No categories
    Translate to English
    |
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  3. Bryan Kolb & Arif Muhammad (2013). Harnessing the Power of Neuroplasticity for Intervention. Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 7:797.score: 30.0
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  4. Ali Muhammad (2009). Does Sex of Children Matter? Implications for Fertility in Pakistan. Journal of Biosocial Science 41 (1):39.score: 30.0
    No categories
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  5. Nik Maheran Nik Muhammad & Filzah Md Isa (2009). Impact of Culture and Knowledge Acquisition to Organizational Success: Study on Chinese and Malay Small Firms. Asian Culture and History 1 (2):P63.score: 30.0
    Research generally concludes that small businesses contribute to economic development. In Malaysia, small firm’s particularly Chinese small firms have played a very important role for economic growth in this country. Chinese firms have managed to survive, grow and succeed either in Malaysia or anywhere else in the world. Most prior research found that the success factor was related to their socio-cultural context. However, previous studies have found the similarities on the cultural values of the Malays and Chinese which derived from (...)
    No categories
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  6. Ibn al-Ḥajjāj & Aḥmad ibn Muḥammad (2005). .score: 30.0
    Translate to English
    |
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  7. ʻAbd al-Muḥsin & ʻAbd al-Rāḍī Muḥammad (2006). .score: 30.0
    Translate to English
    |
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  8. Quṭb al-Taḥtānī & Muḥammad ibn Muḥammad (2003). .score: 30.0
    Translate to English
    |
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  9. Nazli Anum Mohd Ghazali (2010). Corporate Governance and Voluntary Disclosure in Malaysia. International Journal of Business Governance and Ethics 5 (4):261.score: 30.0
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  10. Mazalan Kamis & Mazanah Muhammad (2007). Islam's Lifelong Learning Mandate. In Sharan B. Merriam (ed.), Non-Western Perspectives on Learning and Knowing. Krieger Pub. Co..score: 30.0
    No categories
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  11. Ibn Miskawayh & Aḥmad ibn Muḥammad (1964). An Unpublished Treatise of Miskawaih on Justice. Leiden, E. J. Brill.score: 30.0
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  12. Ibn Miskawayh & Aḥmad ibn Muḥammad (1968). The Refinement of Character. Beirut[American University of Beirut].score: 30.0
  13. Yaḥyá Muḥammad (2005). .score: 30.0
    No categories
    Translate to English
    |
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  14. Khānaqāhī Abū Naṣr Ṭāhir ibn Muḥammad & Flfrom Old Catalog] (). Guzīdah Dar Akhlāq Va Taṣavvuf.score: 30.0
  15. Aḣmad Muḣammad (2004). Islom Ḣazorasi. Movarounnaḣr.score: 30.0
    No categories
    Translate to English
    |
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  16. A. R. Muhammad (2010). Akulturasi Nilai-Nilai Persaudaraan Islam Model Dayah Aceh. Kementerian Agama Ri, Badan Litbang Dan Diklat, Puslitbang Lektur Keagamaan.score: 30.0
    Translate to English
    |
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  17. Drut Muhammad (2001). Conflict Resolution in Tertiary Institutions: A Discussion of Principles. In Gbola Aderibigbe & Deji Ayegboyin (eds.), Religion and Social Ethics. National Association for the Study of Religions and Education (Nasred). 234.score: 30.0
    No categories
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  18. Faiza Muhammad (2008). The Chaotic Paradigm of Complexity. Proceedings of the Xxii World Congress of Philosophy 15:175-202.score: 30.0
    Contemporary research, across various disciplines, alludes to notion of complexity. Indeed, the phenomenon has even been accredited for comprising a new “world-view” that not only heralds theory construction but also instigates miscellaneous nifty yet practical avenues. On the other hand, however, the complexityparadigm has frequently been criticized of obscurity, contestation and scope imprecision. In addition, its various mutually incommensurable philosophical implications have lead to much heated debates regarding methodological pluralism and metaphorical applications, within literature. To elaborately discussand resolve these concerns, (...)
    No categories
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  19. Sher Muhammad (2008). The Touchstones of Prophet and Mujaddids. Ahmadiyya Anjuman Ishaʻat-E-Islam.score: 30.0
    No categories
    Translate to English
    |
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  20. Ibn Ṭumlūs & Yūsuf ibn Muḥammad (2006). .score: 30.0
    Translate to English
    |
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  21. Theresa Weynand Tobin (2010). Toward an Epistemology of Mysticism. International Philosophical Quarterly 50 (2):221-241.score: 24.0
    While some philosophers suggest that mystical experience may provide evidence for belief in God, skeptics doubt that there is adequate warrant for even accepting the claim of a mystical experience as evidence for anything, except perhaps for some kind of mental instability. Drawing from the work of Gabriel Marcel, I argue that the pervasive philosophical skepticism about the evidential status of mystical experiences is misguided because it rests on too narrow a view about ways of knowing and about what can (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  22. Muhammad Hozien (2006). Ghazali and the Poetics of Imagination. Journal of Islamic Philosophy 2 (1):201-202.score: 24.0
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  23. Muhammad Al-Ghazali (1997). The Problem of Evil: An Islamic Approach. In William Cenkner (ed.), Evil and the Response of World Religion. Paragon House. 70--79.score: 24.0
    No categories
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  24. Muhammad Abul Quasem (1975/1978). The Ethics of Al-Ghazali: A Composite Ethics in Islam. Caravan Books.score: 24.0
  25. Edward Omar Moad (2007). Al-Ghazali's Reflections on the Metaphysics of Metaphor in the Mishkāt Al- Anwar. Sophia 46 (2):163-175.score: 18.0
    Mythological language is sometimes understood as a way of representing, by concrete imagery, more abstract notions. In this paper, we will pose some metaphysical questions about the possibility of such a representation. These questions will serve to motivate a brief tour of Mishkāt al-Anwār (Niche of Lights)—Abu Hamid al-Ghazali’s commentary on the famous ayat al-nur (“verse of light”) of the Qur’an—wherein is discussed, among other things, how symbolic imagery is possible, and “the respect in which the spirits of the meanings (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  26. Ali Hasan (2013). Al-Ghazali and Ibn Rush (Averroes) on Creation and the Divine Attributes. In Jeanine Diller & Asa Kasher (eds.), Models of God and Alternative Ultimate Realities. Springer. 141-156.score: 18.0
    Al-Ghazali (1058-1111) was concerned that early Islamic philosophers were leaning too heavily and uncritically on Aristotelian and Neoplatonic ideas in developing their models of God and His relation to the world. He argued that their views were not only irreligious, but philosophically problematic, and he defended an alternative view aimed at staying closer to the Qur’an and the beliefs of the ordinary Muslim. Ibn Rushd (1126-1198) responded to al-Ghazali’s critique and developed a sophisticated Aristotelian view. The present chapter explores their (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  27. Henrik Lagerlund (2010). Al-Ghazali on the Form and Matter of the Syllogisms. Vivarium 48 (1-2):193-214.score: 18.0
    Al-Ghazālī's Maqāsid al-falāsifa is an intelligent reworking of Avicenna's Dānesh-name (Book of Science). It was assumed by Latin scholastics that the Maqāsid contained the views of Al-Ghazālī himself. Very well read in Latin translation, it was the basic text from which the Latin authors gained their knowledge of Arabic logic. This article examines the views on the form and matter of the syllogism given in the Maqāsid and considers how they would have been viewed by a Latin reader (...)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  28. Réjane Gay-Canton (2010). Lorsque Muḥammad orne les autels. Revue des Sciences Philosophiques Et Théologiques 2 (2):201-248.score: 15.0
    No categories
    Translate to English
    | Direct download (3 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  29. Omar Edward Moad (2009). Comparing Phases of Skepticism in Al-Ghazālī and Descartes: Some First Meditations on Deliverance From Error. Philosophy East and West 59 (1):pp. 88-101.score: 12.0
    Abū Hāmid al-Ghazālī (1058–1111 c.e .) is well known, among other things, for his account, in al-Munqidh min al-ḍalāl (Deliverance from error), of a struggle with philosophical skepticism that bears a striking resemblance to that described by Descartes in the Meditations . This essay aims to give a close comparative analysis of these respective accounts, and will concentrate solely on the processes of invoking or entertaining doubt that al-Ghazālī and Descartes describe, respectively. In the process some subtle differences (...)
    Direct download (8 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  30. Tamara Albertini (2005). Crisis and Certainty of Knowledge in Al-Ghazali (1058-1111) and Descartes (1596-1650). Philosophy East and West 55 (1):1-14.score: 12.0
    : In his autobiographical account, the Munqidh min al-Dalāl, al-Ghazālī reflects on his conversion from skepticism to faith. Previous scholarship has interpreted this text as an anticipation of Cartesian positions regarding epistemic certainty. Although the existing similarities between al-Ghazālī and Descartes are striking, the focus of the present essay lies on the different philosophical aims pursued by the two thinkers. It is thus argued that al-Ghazālī operates with a broader notion of the Self than Descartes, because it (...)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  31. Zain Imtiaz Ali (2007). Al-Ghazālī and Schopenhauer on Knowledge and Suffering. Philosophy East and West 57 (4):409-419.score: 12.0
    : The "major Islamic philosophers," writes Deborah Black, "produced no works dedicated to aesthetics, although their writings do address issues that contemporary philosophers might study under that heading." The emergent theme in this essay is that classical Islamic philosophy may be studied within a framework of aesthetics. To achieve this goal, the metaphysics of Abu Hamid al-Ghazālī (1058–1111) and the aesthetics of Arthur Schopenhauer (1788–1860) will be brought together.
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  32. Edward Omar Moad (2007). Al-Ghazali on Power, Causation, and 'Acquisition'. Philosophy East and West 57 (1):1-13.score: 12.0
    : Al-Ghazali on Power, Causation, and 'Acquisition' Edward Omar Moad In Al-Iqtişādfial-I'tiqād (Moderation in belief ), at the end of his chapter on divine power, Abu Hamid al-Ghazali writes, "No created thing comes about through another [created thing]. Rather, all come about through [divine] power." A precise understanding of what al-Ghazali means by this statement requires an understanding of his conception of power. Here, we will articulate this conception of power and show how it renders a distinctive occasionalist thesis that (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  33. George Giacaman & Raja Bahlul (2000). Ghazali on Miracles and Necessary Connection. Medieval Philosophy and Theology 9 (1):39-50.score: 12.0
    The paper offers a critical examination of Ghazali’s main arguments against the views of the philosophers on causation. The authors argue that Ghazali’s definition of miracles as "departure from the usual course of events" carries at least two meanings, only one of which is in conflict with necessary causal relations. The authors also argue that Ghazali’s desire to uphold the possibility of miracles need not constrain him to repudiate the idea of necessary connection, since he is able to explain miracles (...)
    Direct download (7 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  34. Scott Girdner (2010). Review of Avital Wohlman, Al-Ghazali, Averroës and the Interpretation of the Qur'an: Common Sense and Philosophy in Islam, Translated by David Burrell. [REVIEW] Sophia 49 (4):637-639.score: 12.0
    Review of Avital Wohlman, Al-Ghazali, Averroës and the Interpretation of the Qur'an: Common Sense and Philosophy in Islam, Translated by David Burrell Content Type Journal Article Pages 637-639 DOI 10.1007/s11841-010-0207-3 Authors Scott Girdner, Western Kentucky University, 1906 college Heights Blvd., Bowling Green, KY 42101, USA Journal Sophia Online ISSN 1873-930X Print ISSN 0038-1527 Journal Volume Volume 49 Journal Issue Volume 49, Number 4.
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  35. Craig Truglia (2010). Al-Ghazali and Giovanni Pico Della Mirandola on the Question of Human Freedom and the Chain of Being. Philosophy East and West 60 (2):pp. 143-166.score: 12.0
    The person most often credited as the first to free humanity from its bonds in the chain of being was the Renaissance humanist Giovanni Pico della Mirandola. Scholars have asserted that Pico's chain-of-being doctrine was either inspired or predated by earlier European thinkers, namely Marsilio Ficino, Nicholas of Cusa, Allan of Lille, and John Scotus Eriugena. By analyzing the works of the previously listed philosophers, this article argues that Pico's philosophical doctrine was in fact predated by no European writer. Instead, (...)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  36. Aytekin Özel (2008). Al-Ghazālī's Method of Doubt and its Epistemological and Logical Criticism. Journal of Islamic Philosophy 4:69-76.score: 12.0
    The method of doubt has been used in philosophy and theology by both philosophers and theologians, among them al-Ghazālī. Al-Ghazālī’s method conveys the process of how he was cured of his epistemological and existential crisis. This study analyzes each phase of the process in terms of epistemology and logic; it explains the problems and how they appeared to al-Ghazālī.
    No categories
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  37. Maha Elkaisy-Friemuth (2006). God and Humans in Islamic Thought: Abd Al-Jabbar, Ibn Sina and Al-Ghazali. Routledge.score: 12.0
    The explanation of the relationship between God and humans, as portrayed in Islam, is often influenced by the images of God and of human beings which theologians, philosophers and mystics have in mind. The early period of Islam disclose a diversity of interpretations of this relationship. Thinkers from the tenth and eleventh century had the privilege of disclosing different facets of the relationship between humans and the divine. God and Humans in Islamic Thought discusses the view of three different scholars (...)
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  38. Peter Singer, Free Speech, Muhammad, and the Holocaust.score: 12.0
    The timing of Austria’s conviction and imprisonment of David Irving for denying the Holocaust could not have been worse. Coming after the deaths of at least 30 people in Syria, Lebanon, Afghanistan, Libya, Nigeria, and other Islamic countries during protests against cartoons ridiculing Muhammad, the Irving verdict makes a mockery of the claim that in democratic countries, freedom of expression is a basic right.
    No categories
    Translate to English
    | Direct download (2 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  39. Muhammad Ali Khalidi (ed.) (2005). Medieval Islamic Philosophical Writings. Cambridge University Press.score: 12.0
    Philosophy in the Islamic world emerged in the ninth century and continued to flourish into the fourteenth century. It was strongly influenced by Greek thought, but Islamic philosophers also developed an original philosophical culture of their own, which had a considerable impact on the subsequent course of Western philosophy. This volume offers new translations of philosophical writings by Farabi, Ibn Sina (Avicenna), Ghazali, Ibn Tufayl, and Ibn Rushd (Averroes). All of the texts presented here were very influential and invite comparison (...)
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  40. Raja Bahlul (1990). Miracles and Ghazali's First Theory of Causation. Philosophy and Theology 5 (2):137-150.score: 12.0
    In the 17th Discussion of his Tahafut al-Falasifah (“Incoherence of the Philosophers”), Ghazali presents two theories of causation which, he claims, accommodate belief in the possibility of miracles. The first of these, which is usually taken to represent Ghazali’s own position, is a form of occasionalism. In this paper I argue that Ghazali fails to prove that this theory is compatible with belief in the possibility of miracles.
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  41. Michael E. Marmura (2002). Ghazali and Ash'arism Revisited. Arabic Sciences and Philosophy 12 (1):91-110.score: 12.0
    At the basis of Ghazali's criticisms of Ash'arite kalam is the thesis that its primary function is the defence of traditional Islamic belief, the 'aqida, against the distortions of heretical innovations (al-bida'). Kalam is not an end in itself and it is error to think that the mere engagement in it constitutes the experientially religious. In the I[hdotu]ya' he maintains in effect that when it is pursued as an end in itself, its dogmas can constitute a veil preventive of the (...)
    Direct download (8 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  42. Raja Bahlul (1992). Ghazali on the Creation Vs. Eternity of the World. Philosophy and Theology 6 (3):259-275.score: 12.0
    There are two ways in which Ghazali contributes to the discussion of whether God exists: by arguing for the existence of God, and by arguing against certain views which, in his opinion, stand in the way of truly believing that God exists. In this paper I examine Ghazali’s argument from creation and his refutation or the philosophers’ second proof for the eternity or the world. My purpose will be to argue that: firstly, Ghazali’s argument and his refutation are based on (...)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  43. Stephen Riker (1996). Al-Ghazali on Necessary Causality in The Incoherence of the Philosophers. The Monist 79 (3):315-324.score: 12.0
    Many scholars of modern philosophy link the discussion of the necessary nature of causality inexorably with the name of the David Hume. Yet, long before Hume, the issue of necessary causality had been taken up by the Medieval Islamic philosopher Al-Ghazali. The purpose of this paper will be to examine Al-Ghazali’s views concerning the necessary nature of causality in his work ’The Incoherence of the Philosophers’ with particular reference to the issue of whether there is a complete rejection of causality, (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  44. Farouk Mitha (2001). Al-Ghazālī and the Ismailis: A Debate on Reason and Authority in Medieval Islam. Distributed in the U.S. By St. Martin's Press.score: 12.0
    Al-Ghazali is arguably one of the most influential thinkers in the history of Islam, and his writings have received greater scholarly attention in the West than those of any other Muslim scholar. This study explores an important dimension of his thought that has not yet been fully examined, namely, his polemical engagement with the Ismailis of the Fatimid and early Alamut periods. Published in association with The Institute of Ismaili Studies.
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  45. Boris Hennig (2007). Ghazali on Immaterial Substances. In Christian Kanzian & Muhammad Legenhausen (eds.), Substance and Attribute in Islamic Philosophy. Western and Islamic Tradition in Dialogue. Ontos Verlag.score: 12.0
    I will in this paper attempt to extract a positive doctrine on the substantiality of the human soul from Ghazali"s critique of the Aristotelian philosophical tradition. Rather than reflecting on the possibilities and limitations of intercultural dialogue, my aim is to directly engage in such dialogue. Accordingly, I will not suppose that we need to develop and apply external standards according to which one of the two philosophical traditions addressed here, Western and Islamic, may turn out to be superior. Up (...)
    Translate to English
    | Direct download (2 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  46. M. V. Dougherty (2008). Ghazālī and Metaphorical Predication in the Third Discussion of the Tahāfut Al-Falāsifa. American Catholic Philosophical Quarterly 82 (3):391-409.score: 12.0
    Ghazālī’s The Incoherence of the Philosophers is an unusual philosophical work for a number of reasons, not the least of which is the author’s explicit disavowalof any of the conclusions contained within it. The present essay examines some of the hermeneutical challenges that face readers of the work and offers anexegetical account of the much-neglected Third Discussion, which examines a key point of Neoplatonic metaphysics. The paper argues that Ghazālī’s maintaining of the incompatibility of metaphysical creationism and Neoplatonic (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  47. Javed Majeed (2007). Geographies of Subjectivity, Pan-Islam and Muslim Separatism: Muhammad Iqbal and Selfhood. Modern Intellectual History 4 (1):145-161.score: 12.0
    This essay focuses on the oppositional politics expressed in the historical geography of the Persian and Urdu poetry of Muhammad Iqbal (1877–1938), showing how it emerges from, and breaks with, Urdu and Persian travelogues and poetry of the nineteenth century. It explores the complex relationships between the politics of Muslim separatism in South Asia and European imperialist discourses. There are two defining tensions within this politics. The first is between territorial nationalism and the global imaginings of religious identity, and the (...)
    No categories
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  48. Michael E. Marmura (1994). Ghazali's Chapter on Divine Power in the Iqti Ād. Arabic Sciences and Philosophy 4 (02):279-.score: 12.0
    The theological foundations of Ghazali's causal theory are fully expressed in the chapter on the attribute of divine power in his al-Iqtid (Moderation in Belief). The basic doctrine which he proclaims and argues for is that divine power, an attribute additional to the divine essence, is one and pervasive. It does not consist of a multiplicity of powers that produce a multiplicity of effects, but is a unitary direct cause of each and every created existent. In a defense of the (...)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  49. Ebrahim Moosa (2005). Ghazālī and the Poetics of Imagination. University of North Carolina Press.score: 12.0
    Abu Hamid al-Ghazali, a Muslim jurist-theologian and polymath who lived from the mid-eleventh to the early twelfth century in present-day Iran, is a figure equivalent in stature to Maimonides in Judaism and Thomas Aquinas in Christianity. He is best known for his work in philosophy, ethics, law, and mysticism. In an engaged re-reading of the ideas of this preeminent Muslim thinker, Ebrahim Moosa argues that Ghazali's work has lasting relevance today as a model for a critical encounter with the Muslim (...)
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  50. Avraham Hakim (2010). Al-Qadi al-Nu'man b. Muhammad al-Maghribi (m. 363/974). Risalat Dhat al-Bayan fi l-Radd'ala Ibn Qutayba ou L'épître de l'Éloquente clarification concernant la réfutation d'Ibn Qutayba (II). [REVIEW] Al-Qantara: Revista de Estudios Árabes 31 (2):351-369.score: 12.0
    Al-Qadi al-Nu´man b. Muhammad es el más destacado y prolífico de los estudiosos fatimíes y el fundador de la jurisprudencia isma´ilí. En su epístola " La clarificación elocuente para la refutación de Ibn Qutayba", todavía en manuscrito, al-Nu,man se lanza a una polémica en contra de Ibn Qutayba, que había vivido un siglo antes. Es probable que la epístola fuera escrita en la época de al- Mu´izz a petición de un tutor anónimo de los hijos del califa. En ella, al-Nu´man (...)
    No categories
    Translate to English
    | Direct download (2 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
1 — 50 / 584