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  1. Thérèse Murphy (ed.) (2009). New Technologies and Human Rights. Oxford University Press.
    The first IVF baby was born in the 1970s. Less than 20 years later, we had cloning and GM food, and information and communication technologies had transformed everyday life. In 2000, the human genome was sequenced. More recently, there has been much discussion of the economic and social benefits of nanotechnology, and synthetic biology has also been generating controversy. This important volume is a timely contribution to increasing calls for regulation - or better regulation - of these and other new (...)
     
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  2. Thérèse Murphy (2009). Repetition, Revolution, and Resonance : An Introduction to New Technologies and Human Rights. In , New Technologies and Human Rights. Oxford University Press.
  3. Thérèse Murphy (2009). The Texture of Reproductive Choice : Law, Ethnography, and Reproductive Technologies. In , New Technologies and Human Rights. Oxford University Press.
     
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  4. Thérèse Murphy & Noel Whitty (2006). The Question of Evil and Feminist Legal Scholarship. Feminist Legal Studies 14 (1):1-26.
    In this article, we argue that feminist legal scholars should engage directly and explicitly with the question of evil. Part I summarises key facts surrounding the prosecution and life-long imprisonment of Myra Hindley, one of a tiny number of women involved in multiple killings of children in recent British history. Part II reviews a range of commentaries on Hindley, noting in particular the repeated use of two narratives: the first of these insists that Hindley is an icon of female evil; (...)
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  5. Thérèse Murphy (2000). Gametes, Law and Modern Preoccupations. Health Care Analysis 8 (2):155-169.
    This article surveys a range of recent media storiesabout human gametes, pinning them to a series of widerpreoccupations within late modern life. Threepreoccupations are singled out: first, kinship andrelational identity; secondly, Nature andglobalisation; and finally, sexual difference andequality. Each one of these preoccupations has beencharacterised as iconic; debates about them are saidto crystallise who we are, especially ouruncertainties, and what we will be in the future. Byindexing these preoccupations to the stories abouthuman gametes, the article aims to upset both theincreasing (...)
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  6. Thérèse Murphy & Noel Whitty (2000). What is a Fair Trial? Rape Prosecutions, Disclosure and the Human Rights Act. Feminist Legal Studies 8 (2):143-167.
    This article engages with the vogue for predicting the effects of the Human Rights Act 1998 by focusing on the rape prosecution and trial. The specific interest is feminist scrutiny of the right to a fair trial, particularly the concept of ‘fairness’, in light of the increasing use of disclosure rules (in Canada and England) to gain access to medical and counseling records. Transcending the two contemporary narratives of ‘victims’/women’s rights and defendants’ rights in the criminal justice system, the authors (...)
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  7. Helen Reece, Divorcing Responsibly, Thérèse Murphy & Noel Whitty (2000). Volume8 No. 1 2000. Feminist Legal Studies 8:381-382.
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