Search results for 'Murray Newton Rothbard' (try it on Scholar)

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  1. Murray Newton Rothbard (1979). Individualism and the Philosophy of the Social Sciences. Cato Institute.score: 870.0
     
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  2. Murray Newton Rothbard (1982). The Ethics of Liberty. Humanities Press.score: 870.0
     
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  3. Warren Murray (1992). L'inertie Et l'Espace-Temps Absolu de Newton à Einstein. Review of Metaphysics 46 (1):154-156.score: 360.0
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  4. Murray N. Rothbard, Robert Nozick and the Immaculate Conception of the State.score: 240.0
    attempt to justify the State, or at least a minimal State confined to the functions of protection. Beginning with a free-market anarchist state of nature, Nozick portrays the State as emerging, by an invisible hand process that violates no one’s rights, first as a dominant protective agency, then to an "ultra-minimal state," and then finally to a minimal state. Before embarking on a detailed critique of the various Nozickian stages, let us consider several grave fallacies in Nozick’s conception itself, each (...)
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  5. Murray Rothbard (1963). The Logic and Semantics of Government. World Futures 2 (2):95-100.score: 240.0
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  6. Murray Rothbard (1987). Review of Grassl and Smith, Austrian Economics. Historical and Philosophical Background. Journal of Applied Philosophy 4:248�250.score: 240.0
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  7. Murray N. Rothbard (1988). Christians for Freedom. International Philosophical Quarterly 28 (1):112-114.score: 240.0
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  8. Murray N. Rothbard (1980). Ludwig von Mises and Natural Law: A Comment on Professor Gonce. Journal of Libertarian Studies 4 (3):289-97.score: 240.0
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  9. Murray N. Rothbard (1978). The Foreign Policy of the Old Right.”. Journal of Libertarian Studies 2 (1):85-96.score: 240.0
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  10. Murray N. Rothbard (1981). The Laissez-Faire Radical: A Quest for the Historical Mises. Journal of Libertarian Studies 5 (3):237-253.score: 240.0
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  11. Murray N. Rothbard (1989). World War I as Fulfillment: Power and the Intellectuals. Journal of Libertarian Studies 9:81-125.score: 240.0
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  12. Walter Block, Samuel Bostaph, Ricardo F. Crespo, Jeffrey M. Herbener, Richard C. B. Johnsson, Tibor R. Machan, Douglas B. Rasmussen, Murray N. Rothbard, Chris Matthew Sciabarra, Larry J. Sechrest, Barry Smith & Gloria Zúñiga (2005). Philosophers of Capitalism: Menger, Mises, Rand, and Beyond. Lexington Books.score: 240.0
     
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  13. Murray Rothbard (1997). Adam Smith, Justice, and the System of Natural Liberty. Journal of Libertarian Studies 13 (1):01-20.score: 240.0
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  14. Murray N. Rothbard (1995). Bureaucracy and the Civil Service in The United States. Journal of Libertarian Studies 11 (2):3-75.score: 240.0
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  15. Murray N. Rothbard (1990). Concepts of the Role of Intellectuals in Social Change Toward Laissez Faire. Journal of Libertarian Studies 9 (2):44-67.score: 240.0
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  16. Murray N. Rothbard (2002). Milton Friedman Unraveled. Journal of Libertarian Studies 16 (4; SEAS AUT):37-54.score: 240.0
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  17. Murray N. Rothbard (1994). Nations by Consent: Decomposing the Nation-State. Journal of Libertarian Studies 11 (1):1-10.score: 240.0
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  18. Murray N. Rothbard (1996). Origins of the Welfare State in America. Journal of Libertarian Studies 12 (2):193-232.score: 240.0
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  19. Murray Rothbard (2000). Property and Exchange. In Peter Vallentyne & Hillel Steiner (eds.), Left Libertarianism and its Critics: The Contemporary Debate. Palgrave Publishers Ltd..score: 240.0
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  20. Murray N. Rothbard (1985). Professor Hébert on Entrepreneurship. Journal of Libertarian Studies 7 (2):281-286.score: 240.0
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  21. Murray N. Rothbard (2006). The Spooner-Tucker Doctrine: An Economist's View. Journal of Libertarian Studies 20 (1):5-15.score: 240.0
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  22. Isaac Newton (1953/2005). Newton's Philosophy of Nature: Selections From His Writings. Dover Publications.score: 210.0
    Aside from the Principia and occasional appearances of the Opticks , Newton' writings have remained largely inaccessible to students of philosophy, science, and literature as well as to other readers. This book provides a remedy with wide representation of the interests, problems, and diverse philosophic issues that preoccupied the greatest scientific mind of the seventeenth century. Grouped in sections corresponding to methods, principles, and theological considerations, these selections feature explanatory notes and cross-references to related essays.
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  23. Mary Ann Baily & Thomas H. Murray (2009). Mary Ann Baily and Thomas H. Murray Reply. Hastings Center Report 39 (1):7-7.score: 180.0
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  24. Lindley Murray (1996). Lindley Murray: The Educational Works. Routledge.score: 180.0
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  25. Einstein Y. La Noción De Newton (2001). I NTRODUCCIÓN M ucha gente tiende a pensar que con la teoría de la relatividad de Einstein, el concepto de tiempo absoluto de Isaac Newton quedó totalmente refutado. 1 En este trabajo nos proponemos explorar la idea de que, al. Signos Filosóficos 5:65-81.score: 180.0
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  26. Leonidas Zelmanovitz, “Money and War in Murray Rothbard's A History of Money and Banking in the United States”.score: 144.0
    This paper is a presentation and an interpretation of Murray Rothbard’s views on the relation between the fiscal necessities brought by war and interventionism in Money and Banking as read from his book A History of Money and Banking in the United States.
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  27. Brian Ó Caithnia (2012). Murray Rothbard: Major Conservative and Libertarian Thinkers Series, Volume 15. International Journal of Philosophical Studies 20 (4):584-589.score: 144.0
    (2012). Murray Rothbard: Major Conservative and Libertarian Thinkers series, Volume 15. International Journal of Philosophical Studies: Vol. 20, No. 4, pp. 584-589.
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  28. Warren J. Samuels (1998). Murray Rothbard's Austrian Perspective on the History of Economic Thought. Critical Review 12 (1-2):71-76.score: 144.0
    Abstract Murray Rothbard's Austrian Perspective on the History of Economic Thought demonstrates his mastery of the literature. But his interpretation of the development of economics reflects, and is therefore severely limited by, his Austrian?libertarian perspective. Indeed, Rothbard appropriates the history of economic thought principally to advance his perspective, as seen in his neglect of social control, his identification of his desired economic system with the natural order of things, and especially in his denigratory treatment of Adam (...)
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  29. Yuri Maltsev (forthcoming). Murray N. Rothbard as a Critic of Socialism. Journal of Libertarian Studies.score: 140.0
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  30. M. Eabrasu (2013). Rothbard's and Hoppe's Justifications of Libertarianism: A Critique. Politics, Philosophy and Economics 12 (3):288-307.score: 58.0
    Murray N. Rothbard and Hans-Hermann Hoppe build their libertarian theory of justice on two axioms concerning self-ownership and homesteading, which are bolstered by two key arguments: reductio ad absurdum and performative contradiction. Each of these arguments is designed to demonstrate that libertarianism is the only theory of justice that can be justified. If either of these arguments were valid, it would prove the libertarian claim that the state is an unjust political arrangement. Giving due weight to the importance (...)
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  31. Kathleen Touchstone, “Rand, Rothbard, and Rights Reconsidered”.score: 54.0
    This paper examines rights and the protection of rights from both the minarchist and the anarchist perspectives. The former relies on Objectivist (and Neo-Objectivist) perspectives and the latter relies primarily on Murray Rothbard’s views. My view is that government protection as put forth by Objectivists is coercive, as are all methods [...].
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  32. Walter Horn (1984). Libertarianism and Private Property in Land I. American Journal of Economics and Sociology 43 (3):341-356.score: 36.0
    The positions on private landownership of two libertarian scholars thought to have a wide following in that movement are examined The libertarians —Murray Rothbard and Robert Nozick—hold positions which are untenable. Rothbard's theory is almost indistinguishable from John Locke's and rests on the labor theory of ownership and the admixture theory of labor; standards which are too vague. Nozick believes that making something valuable gives a right of ownership, but again the standard is too ambiguous. And it (...)
     
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  33. Walter Block (1980). On Robert Nozick's 'on Austrian Methodology'. Inquiry 23 (4):397 – 444.score: 28.0
    Austrian economics - the school of thought associated with Carl Menger, Frederick von Weiser, Eugen von Bohm-Bawerk, and in this century, Ludwig von Mises, Friedrich Hayek, Murray N. Rothbard, and Israel Kirzner - is based on a framework of methodological principles and assumptions much at variance with those of traditional or 'orthodox' economists. Robert Nozick, in his 'On Austrian Methodology', focuses attention on the most fundamental features of this framework, and subjects them to a thoroughgoing and scathing analysis. (...)
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  34. Lee Haddigan, “The Importance of Christian Thought for the American Libertarian Movement: Christian Libertarianism, 1950–71″.score: 28.0
    Murray N. Rothbard argued that there are many philosophic and non-philosophic arguments that provide a satisfactory basis for individual liberty. Rarely, however, did he discuss the claims of Christianity to be a suitable foundation for individual freedom. By looking at the Christian libertarians of the Old Right, between 1950 and 1971, [...].
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  35. Roderick Long, The Molinari Society is a Professional Society Affiliated with the Eastern Division of the American Philosophical Association.score: 28.0
    Working in the tradition of Gustave de Molinari (1819-1912), Benjamin Tucker (1854-1939), and Murray N. Rothbard (1926-1995), the Molinari Society is a philosophical society dedicated to promoting critical discussion and innovative research in radical libertarian theory.
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  36. Chris Matthew Sciabarra & Larry J. Sechrest (2005). Ayn Rand Among the Austrians: Introduction. Journal of Ayn Rand Studies 6 (2):241 - 250.score: 28.0
    This article surveys Rand's relationship to key thinkers in the Austrian school of economics, including Ludwig von Mises, Murray N. Rothbard, and F. A. Hayek. Austrian theory informs the writings of Rand and her early associates (e.g., Nathaniel Branden, Alan Greenspan, and George Reisman) on topics ranging from monopoly to business cycles. Some post-Randian thinkers (e.g., Richard Salsman), however, have repudiated many of these insights, thus constituting a movement away from the historically close relationship between Objectivism and Austrianism. (...)
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  37. Marius Stan (forthcoming). Euler, Newton, and Foundations for Mechanics. In Chris Smeenk & Eric Schliesser (eds.), The Oxford Handbook of Newton. Oxford University Press.score: 27.0
    This chapter looks at Euler’s relation to Newton, and at his role in the rise of ‘Newtonian’ mechanics. It aims to give a sense of Newton’s complicated legacy for Enlightenment science, and to raise awareness that some key ‘Newtonian’ results are really due to Euler.
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  38. Robert S. Taylor (2005). Self-Ownership and the Limits of Libertarianism. Social Theory and Practice 31 (4):465-482.score: 24.0
    In the longstanding debate between liberals and libertarians over the morality of redistributive labor taxation, liberals such as John Rawls and Ronald Dworkin have consistently taken the position that such taxation is perfectly compatible with individual liberty, whereas libertarians such as Robert Nozick and Murray Rothbard have adopted the (very) contrary position that such taxation is tantamount to slavery. In this paper, I argue that the debate over redistributive labor taxation can be usefully reconstituted as a debate over (...)
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  39. Quayshawn Spencer (2004). Do Newton's Rules of Reasoning Guarantee Truth ... Must They? Studies in History and Philosophy of Science 35 (4):759-782.score: 24.0
    Newton’s Principia introduces four rules of reasoning for natural philosophy. Although useful, there is a concern about whether Newton’s rules guarantee truth. After redirecting the discussion from truth to validity, I show that these rules are valid insofar as they fulfill Goodman’s criteria for inductive rules and Newton’s own methodological program of experimental philosophy; provided that cross-checks are used prior to applications of rule 4 and immediately after applications of rule 2 the following activities are pursued: (1) (...)
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  40. B. Smith (1996). In Defense of Extreme (Fallibilistic) Apriorism. Journal of Libertarian Studies 12:179–192.score: 24.0
    We presuppose a position of scientific realism to the effect (i) that the world exists and (ii) that through the working out of ever more sophisticated theories our scientific picture of reality will approximate ever more closely to the world as it really is. Against this background consider, now, the following question: 1. Do the empirical theories with the help of which we seek to approximate a good or true picture of reality rest on any non-empirical presuppositions? One can answer (...)
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  41. Hylarie Kochiras (2009). Gravity and Newton's Substance Counting Problem. Studies in History and Philosophy of Science 40 (3):267-280.score: 24.0
    A striking feature of Newton’s thought is the very broad reach of his empiricism, potentially extending even to immaterial substances, including God, minds, and should one exist, a non-perceiving immaterial medium. Yet Newton is also drawn to certain metaphysical principles—most notably the principle that matter cannot act where it is not—and this second, rationalist feature of his thought is most pronounced in his struggle to discover ‘gravity’s cause’. The causal problem remains vexing, for he neither invokes primary causation, (...)
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  42. Edward Slowik (2013). Newton's Neo-Platonic Ontology of Space. Foundations of Science 18 (3):419-448.score: 24.0
    This paper investigates Newton’s ontology of space in order to determine its commitment, if any, to both Cambridge neo-Platonism, which posits an incorporeal basis for space, and substantivalism, which regards space as a form of substance or entity. A non-substantivalist interpretation of Newton’s theory has been famously championed by Howard Stein and Robert DiSalle, among others, while both Stein and the early work of J. E. McGuire have downplayed the influence of Cambridge neo-Platonism on various aspects of (...)’s own spatial hypotheses. Both of these assertions will be shown to be problematic on various grounds, with special emphasis placed on Stein’s influential case for a non-substantivalist reading. Our analysis will strive, nonetheless, to reveal the unique or forward-looking aspects of Newton’s approach, most notably, his critical assessment of substance ontologies, that help to distinguish his theory of space from his neo-Platonic contemporaries and predecessors. (shrink)
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  43. Nicholas Maxwell (2014). Three Criticisms of Newton’s Inductive Argument in the Principia. Advances in Historical Studies 3 (1):2-11.score: 24.0
    In this paper, I discuss how Newton’s inductive argument of the Principia can be defended against criticisms levelled against it by Duhem, Popper and myself. I argue that Duhem’s and Popper’s criticisms can be countered, but mine cannot. It requires that we reconsider, not just Newton’s inductive argument in the Principia, but also the nature of science more generally. The methods of science, whether conceived along inductivist or hypothetico-deductivist lines, make implicit metaphysical presuppositions which rigour requires we make (...)
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  44. Ori Belkind (2013). Leibniz and Newton on Space. Foundations of Science 18 (3):467-497.score: 24.0
    This paper reexamines the historical debate between Leibniz and Newton on the nature of space. According to the traditional reading, Leibniz (in his correspondence with Clarke) produced metaphysical arguments (relying on the Principle of Sufficient Reason and the Principle of Identity of Indiscernibles) in favor of a relational account of space. Newton, according to the traditional account, refuted the metaphysical arguments with the help of an empirical argument based on the bucket experiment. The paper claims that Leibniz’s and (...)
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  45. Marius Stan (forthcoming). Absolute Space and the Riddle of Rotation: Kant’s Response to Newton. Oxford Studies in Early Modern Philosophy 7.score: 24.0
    Next to theological grounds, Newton also has a fivefold kinematico-dynamical argument for absolute space, from “the properties, causes, and effects” of true motion. Like Newton, Kant holds that bodies have true motions. Unlike him, though, Kant takes all motion to be relative to matter, not absolute space. In consequence, he must respond to Newton’s argument above. I reconstruct here Kant’s answer, from his “Metaphysical Foundations of Phenomenology.” It turns out that Kant addresses just one part of (...)’s case, namely, his “argument from the effects” of rotation. Moreover, to meet his perceived Newton challenge—viz., to show that rotation is relative motion—Kant changes the meaning of ‘relative motion,’ and resorts to centrifugal, non-Newtonian forces. Thereby, he alters the very core of his doctrine, which requires us to reassess Kant’s Newtonianism. Based on my construal, I correct earlier readings of Kant by John Earman and Martin Carrier. And, I defend the need to revise an influential view of Kant’s Phenomenology, due to Michael Friedman. Kant’s struggle, I conclude, illustrate the difficulties that early modern relationists faced as they turned down Newtonian absolute space; and it typifies their selective engagement with Newton’s case for it. (shrink)
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  46. Steffen Ducheyne (2009). Understanding (in) Newton's Argument for Universal Gravitation. Journal for General Philosophy of Science 40 (2):227 - 258.score: 24.0
    In this essay, I attempt to assess Henk de Regt and Dennis Dieks recent pragmatic and contextual account of scientific understanding on the basis of an important historical case-study: understanding in Newton’s theory of universal gravitation and Huygens’ reception of universal gravitation. It will be shown that de Regt and Dieks’ Criterion for the Intelligibility of a Theory (CIT), which stipulates that the appropriate combination of scientists’ skills and intelligibility-enhancing theoretical virtues is a condition for scientific understanding, is too (...)
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  47. Thomas K. Duncan, 22. “Labor Theory of Property: Homesteading and the Loss of Subjective Value”.score: 24.0
    Murray Rothbard, in his The Ethics of Liberty, attempts to derive property ownership from the act of homesteading. Under this system, property is claimed through the act of mixing one’s labor with it. However, the theory of homesteading as a means for property rights formation is one that favors production [...].
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  48. Andrew Janiak (2013). Metaphysics and Natural Philosophy in Descartes and Newton. Foundations of Science 18 (3):403-417.score: 24.0
    This paper compares Newton’s and Descartes’s conceptions of the complex relationship between physics and metaphysics.
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  49. Roderick T. Long, Wittgenstein, Austrian Economics, and the Logic of Action.score: 24.0
    Ludwig von Mises,2 who originated the view, and his students Friedrich Hayek and Murray Rothbard, who developed and extended it. On their view, the laws of economics are conceptual truths, and economic truth is grounded in an a priori science they call praxeology,3 or the “logic of action.”4 Essentially, praxeology is the study of those propositions concerning human action that can be grasped and recognized as true simply in virtue of an inspection of their constituent concepts.
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  50. Liam P. Dempsey (2011). 'A Compound Wholly Mortal' : Locke and Newton on the Metaphysics of (Personal) Immortality. British Journal for the History of Philosophy 19 (2):241-264.score: 24.0
    In this paper I consider a cluster of positions which depart from the immortalist and dualist anthropologies of Rene Descartes and Henry More. In particular, I argue that John Locke and Isaac Newton are attracted to a monistic mind-body metaphysics, which while resisting neat characterization, occupies a conceptual space distinct from the dualism of the immortalists, on the one hand, and thoroughgoing materialism of Thomas Hobbes, on the other. They propound a sort of property monism: mind and body are (...)
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