Search results for 'Murray Newton Rothbard' (try it on Scholar)

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  1. Murray Newton Rothbard (1979). Individualism and the Philosophy of the Social Sciences. Cato Institute.score: 290.0
     
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  2. Murray Newton Rothbard (1982). The Ethics of Liberty. Humanities Press.score: 290.0
     
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  3. Isaac Newton (1953/2005). Newton's Philosophy of Nature: Selections From His Writings. Dover Publications.score: 150.0
    Aside from the Principia and occasional appearances of the Opticks , Newton' writings have remained largely inaccessible to students of philosophy, science, and literature as well as to other readers. This book provides a remedy with wide representation of the interests, problems, and diverse philosophic issues that preoccupied the greatest scientific mind of the seventeenth century. Grouped in sections corresponding to methods, principles, and theological considerations, these selections feature explanatory notes and cross-references to related essays.
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  4. Murray N. Rothbard, Robert Nozick and the Immaculate Conception of the State.score: 120.0
    attempt to justify the State, or at least a minimal State confined to the functions of protection. Beginning with a free-market anarchist state of nature, Nozick portrays the State as emerging, by an invisible hand process that violates no one’s rights, first as a dominant protective agency, then to an "ultra-minimal state," and then finally to a minimal state. Before embarking on a detailed critique of the various Nozickian stages, let us consider several grave fallacies in Nozick’s conception itself, each (...)
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  5. Mary Ann Baily & Thomas H. Murray (2009). Mary Ann Baily and Thomas H. Murray Reply. Hastings Center Report 39 (1):7-7.score: 120.0
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  6. Murray Rothbard (1963). The Logic and Semantics of Government. World Futures 2 (2):95-100.score: 120.0
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  7. Murray N. Rothbard (1988). Christians for Freedom. International Philosophical Quarterly 28 (1):112-114.score: 120.0
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  8. Walter Block, Samuel Bostaph, Ricardo F. Crespo, Jeffrey M. Herbener, Richard C. B. Johnsson, Tibor R. Machan, Douglas B. Rasmussen, Murray N. Rothbard, Chris Matthew Sciabarra, Larry J. Sechrest, Barry Smith & Gloria Zúñiga (2005). Philosophers of Capitalism: Menger, Mises, Rand, and Beyond. Lexington Books.score: 120.0
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  9. Warren Murray (1992). L'inertie Et l'Espace-Temps Absolu de Newton à Einstein. Review of Metaphysics 46 (1):154-156.score: 120.0
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  10. Lindley Murray (1996). Lindley Murray: The Educational Works. Routledge.score: 120.0
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  11. Einstein Y. La Noción De Newton (2001). I NTRODUCCIÓN M ucha gente tiende a pensar que con la teoría de la relatividad de Einstein, el concepto de tiempo absoluto de Isaac Newton quedó totalmente refutado. 1 En este trabajo nos proponemos explorar la idea de que, al. Signos Filosóficos 5:65-81.score: 120.0
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  12. Murray Rothbard (1997). Adam Smith, Justice, and the System of Natural Liberty. Journal of Libertarian Studies 13 (1):01-20.score: 120.0
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  13. Murray N. Rothbard (1995). Bureaucracy and the Civil Service in The United States. Journal of Libertarian Studies 11 (2):3-75.score: 120.0
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  14. Murray N. Rothbard (1990). Concepts of the Role of Intellectuals in Social Change Toward Laissez Faire. Journal of Libertarian Studies 9 (2):44-67.score: 120.0
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  15. Murray N. Rothbard (1980). Ludwig von Mises and Natural Law: A Comment on Professor Gonce. Journal of Libertarian Studies 4 (3):289-97.score: 120.0
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  16. Murray N. Rothbard (2002). Milton Friedman Unraveled. Journal of Libertarian Studies 16 (4; SEAS AUT):37-54.score: 120.0
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  17. Murray N. Rothbard (1994). Nations by Consent: Decomposing the Nation-State. Journal of Libertarian Studies 11 (1):1-10.score: 120.0
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  18. Murray N. Rothbard (1996). Origins of the Welfare State in America. Journal of Libertarian Studies 12 (2):193-232.score: 120.0
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  19. Murray Rothbard (2000). Property and Exchange. In Peter Vallentyne & Hillel Steiner (eds.), Left Libertarianism and its Critics: The Contemporary Debate. Palgrave Publishers Ltd..score: 120.0
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  20. Murray N. Rothbard (1985). Professor Hébert on Entrepreneurship. Journal of Libertarian Studies 7 (2):281-286.score: 120.0
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  21. Murray Rothbard (1987). Review of Grassl and Smith, Austrian Economics. Historical and Philosophical Background. Journal of Applied Philosophy 4:248–250.score: 120.0
  22. Murray N. Rothbard (1978). The Foreign Policy of the Old Right.”. Journal of Libertarian Studies 2 (1):85-96.score: 120.0
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  23. Murray N. Rothbard (1981). The Laissez-Faire Radical: A Quest for the Historical Mises. Journal of Libertarian Studies 5 (3):237-253.score: 120.0
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  24. Murray N. Rothbard (2006). The Spooner-Tucker Doctrine: An Economist's View. Journal of Libertarian Studies 20 (1):5-15.score: 120.0
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  25. Murray N. Rothbard (1989). World War I as Fulfillment: Power and the Intellectuals. Journal of Libertarian Studies 9:81-125.score: 120.0
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  26. Leonidas Zelmanovitz, “Money and War in Murray Rothbard's A History of Money and Banking in the United States”.score: 48.0
    This paper is a presentation and an interpretation of Murray Rothbard’s views on the relation between the fiscal necessities brought by war and interventionism in Money and Banking as read from his book A History of Money and Banking in the United States.
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  27. Brian Ó Caithnia (2012). Murray Rothbard: Major Conservative and Libertarian Thinkers Series, Volume 15. International Journal of Philosophical Studies 20 (4):584-589.score: 48.0
    (2012). Murray Rothbard: Major Conservative and Libertarian Thinkers series, Volume 15. International Journal of Philosophical Studies: Vol. 20, No. 4, pp. 584-589.
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  28. Warren J. Samuels (1998). Murray Rothbard's Austrian Perspective on the History of Economic Thought. Critical Review 12 (1-2):71-76.score: 48.0
    Abstract Murray Rothbard's Austrian Perspective on the History of Economic Thought demonstrates his mastery of the literature. But his interpretation of the development of economics reflects, and is therefore severely limited by, his Austrian?libertarian perspective. Indeed, Rothbard appropriates the history of economic thought principally to advance his perspective, as seen in his neglect of social control, his identification of his desired economic system with the natural order of things, and especially in his denigratory treatment of Adam (...)
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  29. Yuri Maltsev (forthcoming). Murray N. Rothbard as a Critic of Socialism. Journal of Libertarian Studies.score: 42.0
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  30. M. Eabrasu (2013). Rothbard's and Hoppe's Justifications of Libertarianism: A Critique. Politics, Philosophy and Economics 12 (3):288-307.score: 23.0
    Murray N. Rothbard and Hans-Hermann Hoppe build their libertarian theory of justice on two axioms concerning self-ownership and homesteading, which are bolstered by two key arguments: reductio ad absurdum and performative contradiction. Each of these arguments is designed to demonstrate that libertarianism is the only theory of justice that can be justified. If either of these arguments were valid, it would prove the libertarian claim that the state is an unjust political arrangement. Giving due weight to the importance (...)
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  31. Kathleen Touchstone, “Rand, Rothbard, and Rights Reconsidered”.score: 21.0
    This paper examines rights and the protection of rights from both the minarchist and the anarchist perspectives. The former relies on Objectivist (and Neo-Objectivist) perspectives and the latter relies primarily on Murray Rothbard’s views. My view is that government protection as put forth by Objectivists is coercive, as are all methods [...].
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  32. Quayshawn Spencer (2004). Do Newton's Rules of Reasoning Guarantee Truth ... Must They? Studies in History and Philosophy of Science 35 (4):759-782.score: 18.0
    Newton’s Principia introduces four rules of reasoning for natural philosophy. Although useful, there is a concern about whether Newton’s rules guarantee truth. After redirecting the discussion from truth to validity, I show that these rules are valid insofar as they fulfill Goodman’s criteria for inductive rules and Newton’s own methodological program of experimental philosophy; provided that cross-checks are used prior to applications of rule 4 and immediately after applications of rule 2 the following activities are pursued: (1) (...)
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  33. Hylarie Kochiras (2009). Gravity and Newton's Substance Counting Problem. Studies in History and Philosophy of Science 40 (3):267-280.score: 18.0
    A striking feature of Newton’s thought is the very broad reach of his empiricism, potentially extending even to immaterial substances, including God, minds, and should one exist, a non-perceiving immaterial medium. Yet Newton is also drawn to certain metaphysical principles—most notably the principle that matter cannot act where it is not—and this second, rationalist feature of his thought is most pronounced in his struggle to discover ‘gravity’s cause’. The causal problem remains vexing, for he neither invokes primary causation, (...)
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  34. Edward Slowik (2013). Newton's Neo-Platonic Ontology of Space. Foundations of Science 18 (3):419-448.score: 18.0
    This paper investigates Newton’s ontology of space in order to determine its commitment, if any, to both Cambridge neo-Platonism, which posits an incorporeal basis for space, and substantivalism, which regards space as a form of substance or entity. A non-substantivalist interpretation of Newton’s theory has been famously championed by Howard Stein and Robert DiSalle, among others, while both Stein and the early work of J. E. McGuire have downplayed the influence of Cambridge neo-Platonism on various aspects of (...)’s own spatial hypotheses. Both of these assertions will be shown to be problematic on various grounds, with special emphasis placed on Stein’s influential case for a non-substantivalist reading. Our analysis will strive, nonetheless, to reveal the unique or forward-looking aspects of Newton’s approach, most notably, his critical assessment of substance ontologies, that help to distinguish his theory of space from his neo-Platonic contemporaries and predecessors. (shrink)
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  35. Ori Belkind (2013). Leibniz and Newton on Space. Foundations of Science 18 (3):467-497.score: 18.0
    This paper reexamines the historical debate between Leibniz and Newton on the nature of space. According to the traditional reading, Leibniz (in his correspondence with Clarke) produced metaphysical arguments (relying on the Principle of Sufficient Reason and the Principle of Identity of Indiscernibles) in favor of a relational account of space. Newton, according to the traditional account, refuted the metaphysical arguments with the help of an empirical argument based on the bucket experiment. The paper claims that Leibniz’s and (...)
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  36. Steffen Ducheyne (2009). Understanding (in) Newton's Argument for Universal Gravitation. Journal for General Philosophy of Science 40 (2):227 - 258.score: 18.0
    In this essay, I attempt to assess Henk de Regt and Dennis Dieks recent pragmatic and contextual account of scientific understanding on the basis of an important historical case-study: understanding in Newton’s theory of universal gravitation and Huygens’ reception of universal gravitation. It will be shown that de Regt and Dieks’ Criterion for the Intelligibility of a Theory (CIT), which stipulates that the appropriate combination of scientists’ skills and intelligibility-enhancing theoretical virtues is a condition for scientific understanding, is too (...)
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  37. Nicholas Maxwell (2014). Three Criticisms of Newton’s Inductive Argument in the Principia. Advances in Historical Studies 3 (1):2-11.score: 18.0
    In this paper, I discuss how Newton’s inductive argument of the Principia can be defended against criticisms levelled against it by Duhem, Popper and myself. I argue that Duhem’s and Popper’s criticisms can be countered, but mine cannot. It requires that we reconsider, not just Newton’s inductive argument in the Principia, but also the nature of science more generally. The methods of science, whether conceived along inductivist or hypothetico-deductivist lines, make implicit metaphysical presuppositions which rigour requires we make (...)
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  38. Chunghyoung Lee (2011). Infinity and Newton's Three Laws of Motion. Foundations of Physics 41 (12):1810-1828.score: 18.0
    It is shown that the following three common understandings of Newton’s laws of motion do not hold for systems of infinitely many components. First, Newton’s third law, or the law of action and reaction, is universally believed to imply that the total sum of internal forces in a system is always zero. Several examples are presented to show that this belief fails to hold for infinite systems. Second, two of these examples are of an infinitely divisible continuous body (...)
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  39. Andrew Janiak (2013). Metaphysics and Natural Philosophy in Descartes and Newton. Foundations of Science 18 (3):403-417.score: 18.0
    This paper compares Newton’s and Descartes’s conceptions of the complex relationship between physics and metaphysics.
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  40. Gustavo Caponi (2012). ¿Fue Darwin el Newton de la brizna de hierba? Principia 16 (1):53-79.score: 18.0
    http://dx.doi.org/10.5007/1808-1711.2012v16n1p53 Ratifying Haeckel and contradicting Kant’s negative prophesy, in this paper I try to show that Darwin was, really, the Newton of the blade of grass . Darwin showed how the configurations according to goals of the living beings, could be explained from a naturalistic point of view, without having to postulate the existence of an intentional agent that had arranged or prearranged then. This achievement, nevertheless, was obtained by a way that Kant could not foresee and that Haeckel (...)
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  41. Décio Krause (2009). Newton da Costa e a Filosofia de Quase-verdade. Principia 13 (2):105-128.score: 18.0
    Este artigo pretende introduzir os três volumes de Principia que aparecerão em sequência homenageando os 80 anos do professor Newton da Costa. Ao invés de apresentar os artigos um a um, como se faz usualmente em uma introdução como esta, preferimos deixar os artigos falarem por si, e oforoecer aos leitores brasileiros, especialmente nossos estudantes, alguns aspectos da concepção de ciência e da atividade científica de Newton da Costa, fundamentadas no conceito de quase-verdade, que ele contribuiu para desenvolver (...)
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  42. Verônica Calazans (2013). A negação do vazio por parte de Descartes: as críticas de Newton e Voltaire. Doispontos 9 (3).score: 18.0
    As críticas de Newton e Voltaire endereçadas à negação do vazio por parte de Descartes compartilham uma estrutura básica: ambos parecem concordar que tal tese cartesiana conduz a implicações indesejáveis tanto no campo da mecânica, quanto no que diz respeito à teologia. Entretanto, embora Newton admita as implicações teológicas da negação do vazio, elas não constituem o fim último de sua crítica, o que parece ocorrer na crítica de Voltaire. Ao contrário, os argumentos newtonianos para assumir o vazioencontram (...)
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  43. Steffen Ducheyne & Erik Weber (2007). The Concept of Causation in Newton's Mechanical and Optical Work. Logic and Logical Philosophy 16 (4):265-288.score: 18.0
    In this essay the authors explore the nature of efficient causal explanation in Newton’s "Principia and The Opticks". It is argued that: (1) In the dynamical explanations of the Principia, Newton treats the phenomena under study as cases of Hall’s second kind of atypical causation. The underlying concept of causation is therefore a purely interventionist one. (2) In the descriptions of his optical experiments, Newton treats the phenomena under study as cases of Hall’s typical causation. The underlying (...)
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  44. Kenneth R. Westphal (2014). ‘Hegel’s Semantics of Singular Cognitive Reference, Newton’s Methodological Rule 4 and Scientific Realism Today’. Philosophical Inquiries 2 (1):9-67.score: 18.0
    Empirical investigations use empirical methods, data and evidence. This banal observation appears to favour empiricism, especially in philosophy of science, though no rationalist ever denied their importance. Natural sciences often provide what appear to be, and are taken by scientists as, realist, causal explanations of natural phenomena. Empiricism has never been congenial to scientific realism. Bas van Fraassen’s ‘Constructive Empiricism’ purports that realist interpretations of any scientific theory in principle always transcend whatever can be justified by that theory’s empirical adequacy, (...)
     
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  45. Kenneth R. Westphal (2011). ‘Kant’s Cognitive Semantics, Newton’s Rule Four of Philosophy and Scientific Realism’. Bulletin of the Hegel Society of Great Britain 63:27-49.score: 18.0
    Kant’s Critique of Pure Reason contains an original and powerful semantics of singular cognitive reference which has important implications for epistemology and for philosophy of science. Here I argue that Kant’s semantics directly and strongly supports Newton’s Rule 4 of Philosophy in ways which support Newton’s realism about gravitational force. I begin with Newton’s Rule 4 of Philosophy and its role in Newton’s justification of realism about gravitational force (§2). Next I briefly summarize Kant’s semantics of (...)
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  46. Graham Nerlich (2005). Can Parts of Space Move? On Paragraph Six of Newton's Scholium. Erkenntnis 62 (1):119--135.score: 16.0
    Paragraph 6 of Newtons Scholium argues that the parts of space cannot move. A premise of the argument – that parts have individuality only through an order of position – has drawn distinguished modern support yet little agreement among interpretations of the paragraph. I argue that the paragraph offers an a priori, metaphysical argument for absolute motion, an argument which is invalid. That order of position is powerless to distinguish one part of Euclidean space from any other has gone virtually (...)
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  47. Eric Schliesser (2013). On Reading Newton as an Epicurean: Kant, Spinozism and the Changes to the Principia. Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part A 44 (3):416-428.score: 15.0
  48. Katherine Dunlop (2012). The Mathematical Form of Measurement and the Argument for Proposition I in Newton's Principia. Synthese 186 (1):191-229.score: 15.0
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  49. Maurizio Mamiani (2000). The Structure of a Scientific Controversy: Hooke Versus Newton About Colors. In Peter K. Machamer, Marcello Pera & Aristeidēs Baltas (eds.), Scientific Controversies: Philosophical and Historical Perspectives. Oxford University Press. 143.score: 15.0
  50. Eric Schliesser (2011). Newton's Substance Monism, Distant Action, and the Nature of Newton's Empiricism: Discussion of H. Kochiras “Gravity and Newton's Substance Counting Problem”. Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part A 42 (1):160-166.score: 15.0
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